New: Fuji X Weekly Community Recipes!

Can’t get enough film simulation recipes? Have one you want to share? Want to see what others are doing with their Fujifilm cameras? The new Fuji X Weekly Community Recipes page is for you!

I’ve noticed that a lot of people are creating film simulation recipes and sharing them on their social media accounts, but they’re easily lost and forgotten. I wanted to create a place where you can share your recipes, and where you can find recipes created by others. That’s the idea behind the Fuji X Weekly Community Page—this is a library of film simulation recipes created by you and for you!

This project has been in the works for many months. It’s been a labor of love. Web developer and Fujifilm photographer Daniele Petrarolo (website, Instagram) partnered with me to make this a reality. He really put a lot of time and skill into this. Definitely, if you need a website built, visit his page and send him an email! He’s also talented with a camera, so be sure to check out his pictures! Without him, the community recipes page would still be a long ways off and not nearly as good. Marcel Fraij, Thomas Schwab, Julien Sorosac, and others (including my kids!) also had a hand in making this project come to fruition. I want to give a big “thank you” to everyone who participated in this.

If you want even more film simulation recipes for your Fujifilm camera, or if you’ve created a recipe that you want to share, or if you just want to check out some pictures captured by others, be sure to visit the Fuji X Weekly Community Recipes Page! My hope is that this will become a great resource for the Fujifilm community. Be sure to bookmark it and check it often!

Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Scanned Superia

Brownie on a Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Scanned Superia”

After Anders Lindborg shared with me his interesting discovery that D-Range Priority (DR-P) is essentially the same thing as Hypertone on Fujifilm Frontier scanners, I immediately went to work creating a couple film simulation recipes that use D-Range Priority, since I didn’t have any. Like many of you, I thought that DR-P was a feature reserved only for extreme situations, and not for everyday use, but (as it turns out) it doesn’t have to be—DR-P can be utilized all of the time if you want.

What is DR-P? It’s basically a tone curve intended to maximize dynamic range. There are four options: Off, Auto, Weak, and Strong. When DR-P is Off, the camera uses DR (DR100, DR200, DR400) instead, and when DR-P is On (Auto, Weak, or Strong), DR is disabled. When DR-P is On, Highlight and Shadow are “greyed out” so those can’t be adjusted—the curve is built into DR-P. You get what you get. DR-P Weak is similar to using DR400 with both Highlight and Shadow -2, but with a very subtle mid-tone boost. This recipe calls for DR-P Auto, and the camera will usually select DR-P Weak unless there is a bright light source (such as the sun) in the frame, such as the picture below.

Big Grass Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Scanned Superia”

This recipe was inspired by pictures I found that were captured with Fujicolor Superia 100 film scanned with a Frontier SP-3000. Of course, how the film was shot, or even the scanner settings selected, can effect the exact aesthetic of an image. Even the same emulsion captured the same way and scanned on the same scanner can look a little different if the settings on the scanner are different (more on this in an upcoming article). I didn’t spend a lot of time trying to precisely match this recipe to those scans—it was more of a quick attempt, but I liked the results so I didn’t fine-tune it any further. It has a pretty good feel, I think, that produces pleasing results in many circumstances, although it isn’t the best for artificial light, and you might consider using Auto White Balance when not in natural light situations. This recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: D-Range Priority Auto
Color: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -3
Clarity: +3
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Daylight, -2 Red & +3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Scanned Superia” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

RADAR Peak – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Colorful Blooms of Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Last Red Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
White Rose of Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Yellow Country Flowers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Little Yellow Flowers in the Wetlands – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Suburban Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
No Parking Any Time – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Morning Flag – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Succulent Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipe and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-Pro1 (X-Trans I) Film Simulation Recipe: Kodachrome I

Not Filed – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Kodachrome I”

This Kodachrome I film simulation recipe is an adaption of my Vintage Kodachrome recipe for the Fujifilm X-Pro1 and X-E1 cameras. Of course, those two cameras don’t have Classic Chrome, which makes recreating a Kodachrome look nearly impossible; however, Thomas Schwab figured it out! Thank you, Thomas! You might remember, he also figured out how to recreate Kodachrome II using the PRO Neg. Std film simulation. While this recipe isn’t quite as close of a match to the original recipe as Kodachrome II, it does manage to capture the feel of Vintage Kodachrome, and is as close as you’ll get to that aesthetic on X-Trans I. Because it doesn’t have PRO Neg. Std, this is not compatible with the X-M1.

You might recall that the Vintage Kodachrome recipe is mimicked after the first era of Kodachrome, which was from 1935 to 1960. This Kodachrome was the first film that produced reasonably accurate colors, and, because of that, was the first commercially successful color film. It became the standard film for color photography for a couple decades, and was even Ansel Adams’ preferred choice for color work. The December 1946 issue of Arizona Highways, which was the first all-color magazine in the world, featured Barry Goldwater’s Kodachrome images. While the most popular Kodachrome during this time was ISO 10, Kodak also produced an ISO 8 version, as well as a Tungsten option in the 1940s.

Green Oak Leaves – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Kodachrome 1”

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2 (Hard)
Shadow: -2 (Soft)
Color: +2 (High)
Sharpness: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Auto, 0 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to -1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Kodachrome I” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-Pro1:

Green Lake – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Backlit Forest Leaves – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Joshua – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Chicken Soup for the Soul – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Books in a Pew – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Church Pew Near a Window – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Red Carpet Stairs – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Window Light on Floor – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Old Window – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Arched Window – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Steeple View – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Brick Chimney – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X100V (X-Trans III + X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Monochrome Negative

Windows Within Windows – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Monochrome Negative”

It’s been awhile since I created a black-and-white film simulation recipe. Part of it is that my favorite recipe is Kodak Tri-X 400, and I often choose to shoot with that. Another factor is that the differences between monochrome recipes are often much more subtle than color. For this, I didn’t start out with the intention of making a black-and-white recipe—in fact, it began with Classic Negative—and I wasn’t satisfied with the look, so I switched to Acros, and immediately liked what I saw. A few small changes later, and this recipe was born. It’s not modeled after any specific film, so I named it Monochrome Negative, as it does have a nice film-like quality to it.

The trick to this film simulation recipe is underexposure. I found myself most often lowering the exposure by 1/3 or 2/3 stops (many of my recipes often call for the opposite). Highlight set to +3 will keep the image bright, while the underexposure will deepen the shadows and provide good contrast. Obviously each exposure should be judged individually, so don’t be afraid to deviate from this advice.

Happy Birthday Glasses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Monochrome Negative”

This recipe was designed on and intended for the Fujifilm X100V, which has a newer X-Trans IV sensor, but because I didn’t use any of the new tools, such as Clarity and the Color Chrome Effects, this recipe is compatible with all X-Trans III & IV cameras. On X-Pro3 and newer, choose Grain size Small; on all other cameras, which don’t have Grain size as an option, simply select Grain Strong. If your camera has the Acros film simulation, you can use this recipe!

Acros (+Y, +R, +G)
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +3
Shadow: 0
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: 0
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
(Strong for those cameras without Grain Size)
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 12800
Exposure Compensation: 0 to -2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Monochrome Negative” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

1104B – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Withering Flowers Along a Wall – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
City Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Backlit Turning Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Pikachu is a Little Hungry – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Space Fish – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Release – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Geese by a Tackle Box – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Do or Don’t Follow the Crowd – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Approaching Storm – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-Trans III + X-T3 & X-T30 Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Kodacolor VR

Inside City Creek – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

This film simulation recipe was an experiment. I started out with my Fujicolor 100 Industrial recipe, but instead of using a cool White Balance with a warm White Balance Shift, I did the opposite: I used a warm White Balance with a cool shift. After many adjustments to various settings, this ended up not resembling the Fujicolor 100 Industrial recipe much at all, but it does have a great vintage print-film aesthetic that I really like.

I wasn’t sure at first which film this recipe most closely resembled (since it wasn’t intended to mimic any specific film), although it seemed to have some similarities to Kodacolor VR. I already have a Kodacolor recipe, which does a great job at mimicking Kodacolor VR; this recipe and that one look somewhat similar, but definitely different. Then I ran across some pictures that looked very similar to the ones you see in this article, and it turned out that they were shot on Kodacolor VR film that had expired. So I think this recipe, while it does resemble Kodacolor VR, as well as ColorPlus 200 (which is a direct descendant of that film), it most closely looks like Kodacolor VR that’s been stored a little past its expiration date. Of course, one film can have many different looks, depending on how it was shot, developed, scanned and/or printed, and (in this case) stored, so this recipe serves as a nice alternative to my original Kodacolor recipe.

Leaning Tower – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

The Fuji X Weekly app is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best app experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new film simulation recipes. These early-access recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many early-access recipes have already been publicly published on this blog and the app, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no app. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new Patron early-access recipe is compatible with Fujifilm X-Trans III and X-Trans IV cameras. For those with newer cameras, set Color Chrome FX Blue to Off, Clarity to 0 (or perhaps -2), and I’d suggest Grain size Large, but use Small if you prefer.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the app!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Kodacolor VR” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

Summer Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Corner Through Leaves – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Stones & Glass Ceiling – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Glass – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Building a Building – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Small Spaces Between – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Twilight Telephone Poles – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Stoneground – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Goes for Gold – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Night Parking – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Doki Doki – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Escalators – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Downtown Buildings – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Coming Train – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Trax – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Waiting on the Platform – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Glass & Sky – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Tall Downtown Buildings – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-T3 & X-T30 Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Portra 400 v2

Walking on a Bridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Kodak Portra 400 v2”

This film simulation recipe is a slight variation of my Kodak Portra 400 recipe. It came about after I made a Portra 400 v2 recipe for the newer X-Trans IV cameras, which was created after studying actual examples of the film provided to me by a reader. I wanted to create a similar modification for the X-T3 and X-T30, which became this recipe. One film can have many different looks, depending on how it’s shot, developed, and scanned and/or printed, so this isn’t necessarily a “better” recipe, just a slightly different take on recreating the film’s aesthetic. I really like this one, and I think you will, too!

Portra 400, which is a color negative film, was introduced by Kodak in 1998. It was redesign in 2006 and again in 2010. As the name implies, it’s intended for portrait photography, but can be used for many other types of photography. It’s similar to Portra 160, but with more contrast, saturation and grain. Believe it or not, ISO 400 was considered “high ISO” by many photographers back in the film days, and Portra 400 was one of the absolute best “high ISO” color films ever made. Interestingly, Kodak briefly made a black-and-white version of Portra 400!

Downtownscape – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Kodak Portra 400 v2”

This isn’t exactly a brand-new recipe. It was published as a Patron early-access recipe on the Fuji X Weekly App back on December 1st, so Patrons have had access to it for quite some time. Now another early-access recipe has replaced it, so this one is available to everyone! If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, be sure to check out the new early-access recipe in the app.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR-Auto
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -1
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Grain Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
White Balance: Daylight, +2 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Kodak Portra 400 v2” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

Blackberry Forest Evening – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Three Backlit Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Tiny Red Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Broken and Boarded – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Window to the City – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Lululemon – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Two Tall Buildings – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Hotel – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Two Cranes – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
A Downtown Cityscape – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Moffatt Ct. – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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SOOC Episode 02 (and Episode 03!)

Despite a little technical trouble, Episode 02 of SOOC was a great success! I appreciate everyone who tuned in, and for everyone who participated. You guys are great! And it was wonderful to see your Kodachrome II pictures! Here’s the link to submit your Fujicolor C200 photographs: click here. I hope there was something in the broadcast that you found helpful or interesting, and that it was worth your time. It was supposed to be 45 minutes, but it ended up doubling that! If you missed it, you can watch it above.

The technical difficulty that I had on my end is this: my Fujifilm X-E4 that I was using for this broadcast kept overheating. In my review of the camera, I stated that I thought a similar overheating issue to the X100V was possible. Up until this video, which was being recorded live, I had not experienced it. Well, now you and I know: the X-E4 is prone to overheating if left on too long. I’ll use a different camera for future episodes.

I don’t believe the Fuji X Weekly App 12-month Patron giveaway winner has stepped forward yet. Adnan Omanovic was randomly selected from those who submitted pictures. Adnan, if you read this, leave a comment or send me a message so that I can get you your prize.

Episode 03 is already scheduled! If you click on the video where it says “Watch on YouTube” you can then “set a reminder” so you don’t miss it. Otherwise, mark your calendar for September 9th. I hope to see you then!

Reminder: SOOC Episode 02 This Thursday!

As a reminder, Episode 02 of the live interactive video series SOOC will be this Thursday, August 12, at 11 AM MST (10 AM Pacific, 1 PM Eastern)!

SOOC is a collaboration between Tame Your Fujifilm (Fujifilm X Photographer Nathalie Boucry) and Fuji X Weekly (Ritchie Roesch). It is a monthly live video series, and each episode focuses on a different film simulation recipe. It’s a fun and educational experience where we will not only talk about Fujifilm camera settings, but also answer your questions. This is an interactive program, which means that we need your participation! Mark your calendar and be sure to tune in!

I’m really looking forward to Episode 02. Among other things, we’ll take a look at your pictures captured with the Kodachrome II film simulation recipe, and discuss the Fujicolor C200 recipe! I really hope you’ll tune in!

If you missed Episode 01, you’ll find it below:

Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: AgfaChrome RS 100

H&M – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “AgfaChrome RS 100”

I was asked to create a film simulation recipe for AgfaChrome RS 100 color transparency film. Agfa made this slide film from 1984 through 1995, with an “improved emulsion” released in 1992. I never used AgfaChrome RS 100, so I have zero experience with the film. It was difficult to find examples of, and old issues of Popular Photography and Photographic magazines were my best resource. Despite the challenges, I was able to create a film simulation recipe that I’m very happy with.

This AgfaChrome RS 100 recipe renders pictures beautifully! It has a great vintage analog feel to it. People might think that the images are old film pictures that you scanned, and they certainly won’t suspect that they’re straight-out-of-camera JPEGs! I’m confident that this recipe will be an instant favorite for many of you.

Flower Garden – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “AgfaChrome RS 100”

Because this X-Trans IV recipe requires Classic Negative, Clarity, and Color Chrome FX Blue, it’s only compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 cameras—unfortunately it’s not compatible with the X-T3 and X-T30. I believe that it is compatible with the GFX100S, although results will likely be slightly different. If you have a compatible camera, be sure to give this AgfaChrome RS 100 recipe a try!

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: -1
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Daylight, -3 Red & +5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “AgfaChrome RS 100” film simulation recipe on my X100V and X-E4:

Bowl on a Shelf – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Parking Garage – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Below Deck Parking – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Smile – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Little Dragon – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Free People – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Towering Cloud – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Drive Slow, But Don’t Park – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Checkerboard – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Patagonia – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Green Grapes – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Blackberries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Pink Among Green – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Little Cherries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Permission to Park – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
One Way – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Honey Bucket & Trailer – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
We Are Open – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Park City Downtown – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Buildings in Downtown Park City – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Church Cans – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Gas Sign – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-Trans I (X-E1 + X-Pro1) Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Ektachrome

Diesel – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Ektachrome”

The Fuji X Weekly app is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best app experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new film simulation recipes. These early-access recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many early-access recipes have already been publicly published on this blog and the app, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no app. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new Patron early-access recipe is called “Ektachrome” and is compatible with the Fujifilm X-E1 and X-Pro1 cameras. Unfortunately, even though the X-M1 is X-Trans I, this recipe is not compatible with that camera. I really like how this one looks, and I think some of you will really appreciate it, too!

Ektachrome is a line of color transparency film introduced by Kodak in the 1940’s. I did some research, and counted 40 different emulsions over the years that carried the Ektachrome name! Generally speaking, Ektachrome was less warm than Kodachrome (although it depends on which Ektachrome you’re referring to), and also less archival. While Kodachrome was discontinued in 2009, Ektachrome can still be purchased today.

Two Cans – Weber Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1

I’m not certain which (of the 40) Ektachrome films this recipe most closely resembles. It has more of a general Ektachrome feel rather than being an exact copy of a specific emulsion. If you like the Kodachrome II recipe that I just published, you’ll like this one, too!

If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the app!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Ektachrome” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-Pro1:

House Flag – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Dead Wood – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Cattails – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Succulent Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Ektachrome”
Boy On Couch Watching TV – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Drinking Fountain – Weber Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Two Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Berries in a Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Blackberry Bush – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Francis Peak Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-Trans I Film Simulation Recipe: Color Negative Film

Pink Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Color Negative Film”

This Fujifilm X-Trans I film simulation recipe was the first that I created after getting my nine-year-old X-Pro1 camera in the mail. It wasn’t intended to mimic the look of any particular film. I was trying to create a good-looking recipe with a white balance shift inspired by my Fujicolor 100 Industrial recipe. It has a wonderful print film aesthetic, perhaps Kodak-like, that looks especially nice in sunny conditions. I call this recipe “Color Negative Film” because of that generic color negative film quality.

If you are a Patron on the Fuji X Weekly App, you’ve had early access to this recipe since May. A different recipe has replaced it, so if you are a Patron, look for that new early-access recipe in the app! For those who are not Patrons, this recipe is now available to you. If you have a Fujifilm X-Pro1, X-E1, or X-M1, this recipe is compatible with your camera.

Diesel Cash Price – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Color Negative Film”

If you have a Fujifilm Bayer camera, I invite you to try this recipe on your camera, although results will be a little different. Technically, X-Trans II cameras can use it, too, although it definitely won’t look the same—maybe you’ll like it, maybe you won’t. If you have an X-Trans I camera, this is a must-try recipe that many of you are sure to love!

Provia
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2 (High)
Shadow: +2 (High)
Color: -2 (Low)
Sharpness: -1 (Medium-Low)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: 3000K, +8 Red & -9 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Color Negative Film” recipe:

Rising Up – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Red Leaves of Summer – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Backlit White Blossom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Yellow Bench – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Tiny Fruit – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Blackberry Forest – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Building Mountain Storm – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Dead Stump – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Log Bridge – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Cone Closed – Weber Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-Trans I (X-Pro1 + X-E1) Film Simulation Recipe: Kodachrome II

Storm Building Over Mountain Ridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Kodachrome II”

Kodachrome is probably the most iconic photographic film ever made. It was legendary, and many people saw the world through its colors. Kodak produced Kodachrome film from 1935 through 2009, when it was suddenly discontinued.

The Kodachrome name has been used for many different films over the years. The first Kodachrome product was a two-glass-plate color negative that was introduced in 1915. Like all other color photography methods of its time, the results weren’t particularly good and the product not especially successful.

In 1935 Kodak released its next Kodachrome, which was a color transparency film with an ISO of 10. This Kodachrome was the first color film that produced reasonably accurate colors and was the first commercially successful color film. It became the standard film for color photography for a couple decades, and was even Ansel Adams’ preferred choice for color work. The December 1946 issue of Arizona Highways, which was the first all-color magazine in the world, featured Barry Goldwater’s Kodachrome images.

Kodak made significant improvements to Kodachrome, and in 1961 released Kodachrome II. This film boasted more accurate colors, sharper images, finer grain, and a faster ISO of 25. While it was still similar to the previous Kodachrome, it was better in pretty much every way. A year later Kodachrome-X was introduced, which had an ISO of 64.

Neighborhood Flag – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Kodachrome II”

Another generation of Kodachrome, which came out in 1974, saw Kodachrome II replaced by Kodachrome 25 and Kodachrome-X replaced by Kodachrome 64. The differences between this version and the previous weren’t huge and image quality was very similar. The biggest change was going from the K-12 to the K-14 development process (which was a little less toxic and complex, but still toxic and complex). This generation of Kodachrome is what most people think of when they picture (pun intended) the film, gracing the pages of magazines like National Geographic.

While I’ve published a number of recipes with the Kodachrome name, I’ve never made one for X-Trans I because Classic Chrome is necessary to replicate the look, and X-Trans I doesn’t have Classic Chrome. Well, Thomas Schwab got himself a Fujifilm X-E1, and he figured out a pretty phenomenal Kodachrome facsimile using PRO Neg. Std! Unbelievable! It’s amazing how good this recipe looks considering that it doesn’t use Classic Chrome. The X-M1 doesn’t have PRO Neg. Std, so this recipe isn’t compatible with that camera, but if you have an X-E1 or X-Pro1, this one is sure to become an instant favorite! Thank you, Thomas, for creating and sharing this recipe!

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1 (Medium-High)
Shadow: +2 (High)
Color: -2 (Low)
Sharpness: +2 (Hard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Auto, +1 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Kodachrome II” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-Pro1:

Cloud Building Behind Mountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Grass & Flowers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Berry Bush – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Reddish Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Sons for Mayor – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Top Stop – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Restroom Closed – Weber Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Interstate 84 West – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Power Stop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Five Buckets – Weber Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Super HG Astia (Part 3 of 3)

Cacti Wall – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Super HG Astia”

When Thomas Schwab shared with me his Fujicolor Super HG film simulation recipe, he also sent me an alternative recipe that uses Astia instead of Classic Negative. I gave it a try and thought that it worked quite well for landscape photography, particularly in sunny conditions. It can produce interesting results indoors or on cloudy days, but I think it really shines in sunshine. It’s called “Super HG Astia” because it is a modification of the Super HG recipe, but with Astia.

This “Super HG Astia” recipe wasn’t intended to mimic any particular film; however, it does have some resemblance to Fujichrome Provia 100F. For whatever reason, Fujifilm programmed the Provia film simulation to look more like Astia film, and the Astia film simulation to look more like Provia film, although neither are an exact match. This recipe brings the Astia film simulation closer to resembling Provia film (albeit unintentionally). It’s definitely not a perfect facsimile, but it does nonetheless produce a very nice Fuji color-reversal film aesthetic.

Green Pines – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Super HG Astia”

This recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, and X-E4 cameras. I accidentally used Large grain for some of my pictures, and the results were fine, but Small grain is better in my opinion—feel free to use whichever Grain size you’d prefer. For the X-T3 and X-T30, you can use this recipe by ignoring Grain size, Clarity and Color Chrome FX Blue—the results will be slightly different, but pretty close. For X-Trans III cameras, you’ll have to additionally ignore Color Chrome Effect; again, the results will be a little different but still very similar. If you’ve got an X-Trans III or newer camera, I invite you to try this recipe. I want to give a special “Thank you!” to Thomas for creating and sharing this recipe!

Astia
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +1
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -1
Clarity: +2
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Fluorescent 2, -3 Red & -1 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Super HG Astia film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Blue Dumpsters – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
This Sucker’s Electrical – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Gas Pipe – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Ms Pac-Man – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Pen – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Missing Boxer – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Watching A Two-Screen Movie – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Lake Harbor – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Lake Payette – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Lake Log – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4

Part 1 – Fujicolor Super HG Film Simulation Recipe
Part 2 -Fujicolor Super HG v2 Film Simulation Recipe

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Super HG v2 (Part 2 of 3)

Lilac Sun – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Super HG v2”

When Thomas Schwab sent me his settings that would later be called Fujicolor Super HG, he asked me if there were any changes that I would make. I tried his recipe, and then created a couple of alternate versions. I concluded that I liked his recipe as-is with no changes; however, I thought that one variation I created was interesting, so I shot with it, too, and turned it into its own recipe. I call it Fujicolor Super HG v2. While it’s a collaboration between Thomas and I, he contributed the most to it.

Fujifilm introduced the Super HG line in 1986, with versions in ISOs between 100 and 1600. It saw several iterations and improvements before being replaced by the Superia line is 1998. Thomas Schwab’s Fujicolor Super HG recipe and this Fujicolor Super HG v2 recipe are more similar to Super HG 100 or Super HG 200 film. One film can have many different looks depending on how it was shot, developed, printed or scanned. The differences between the Fujicolor Super HG and Fujicolor Super HG v2 recipes might be like the differences produced by using different film scanners.

Joshua Wall – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Super HG v2”

While both Super HG recipes look great, I prefer the Fujicolor Super HG recipe for natural light photography, and I prefer the Fujicolor Super HG v2 recipe for artificial light photography. I invite you to try both, and see which version you like better. You might find that you prefer one in a certain situation and the other in a different situation. Because this recipe uses the new Auto White Priority white balance, it’s only compatible (as of this writing) with the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 cameras (and maybe the GFX100S?). If you have the X-Pro3 or X100V, you can use Auto white balance instead, and in natural light you’ll get identical results, although in artificial light it won’t look quite the same.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +1
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: 0
Clarity: +2
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Auto White Priority, -3 Red & -1 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor Super HG v2 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Crocodile – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Library Lamp – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Books on a Table – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Wood Workshop – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
33 RPM – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Tired Lake Water – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Children Playing With Sand – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Pink Blooms – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
American Renovation – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Sisters – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4

Part 1 – Fujicolor Super HG Film Simulation Recipe
Part 3 – Super HG Astia Film Simulation Recipe

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Super HG (Part 1 of 3)

Suburban Home – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Super HG”

This Fujicolor Super HG recipe was created by Thomas Schwab, who has made several film simulation recipes published on this website, including Fujicolor NPS 160 PulledSuperia Xtra 400Urban Vintage ChromeKodachrome IIKodak Portra 800 v2Classic MonochromeB&W Superia, and Monochrome Kodachrome. Thomas has also collaborated on other recipes, playing an important role in getting them right, including Kodak Portra 800Kodak Ektar 100Kodachrome 1Kodak Portra 400, and Kodak T-Max 400. Whenever Thomas sends me a new recipe idea, I’m always eager to try it out!

Thomas was photographing using the Provia 400 film simulation recipe, which requires a Fluorescent 2 (also called “Warm White Fluorescent” or “Neon 2”) White Balance. He wanted to see how that not-often-used White Balance would look with some other film simulations, and, after several adjustments, came up with this recipe. He shared it with me, and I shot with it and really liked the results! We wondered if it closely resembled any particular film—it seemed to be in the general ballpark of several Fujifilm emulsions without matching any. After digging a little deeper, and after a chance encounter with a box of prints from 1992, it was determined that Fujicolor Super HG, which is a predecessor to the Superia line, was a surprisingly close match. This recipe wasn’t intended to resemble Fujicolor Super HG film, but fortunately it does!

Smokey Sunrise – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Super HG”

I thoroughly enjoyed shooting with this recipe, as it produces some great analogue-like results! Because it requires Classic Negative, Color Chrome FX Blue, and Clarity, it is only compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 cameras. I want to give a big “Thank you!” to Thomas Schwab for creating this great recipe and allowing me to share it with you—thanks, Thomas!

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +1
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: 0
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Fluorescent 2, -3 Red & -1 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor Super HG film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Hole in the Wall – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Locked Bike – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Free College – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
College Hunks – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Arizona Neighborhood – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Hidden Home – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Window Desk – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Suburban Patriotism – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Ceiling Lights – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Carousel Top – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Super Shock Control – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Giant Metal Gorilla – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4

Part 2 – Fujicolor Super HG v2
Part 3 – Super HG Astia

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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New Fujifilm X-Trans IV Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Silver Summer

Wrong Way Shadow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Silver Summer”

The Fuji X Weekly app is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best app experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new film simulation recipes. These early-access recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many early-access recipes have already been publicly published on this blog and the app, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no app. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new Patron early-access recipe is called “Silver Summer” and is compatible with the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10, and X-E4 X-Trans IV cameras. It’s not modeled after any specific film, but it definitely has an analog aesthetic. It does have some unintentional similarities to Lomography Cine 200, but it’s definitely not an exact match. I really like how this one looks, and I think some of you will really appreciate it, too!

If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the app!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Silver Summer” film simulation recipe:

Bee on a Thistle – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Lily – Sundance, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Tree Branch and Creek – Sundance, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Mountain Sky – Sundance, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Zigzag Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Concessions – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Summer Slide – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Wood Coaster – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Don’t Stand – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Summer Swing – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Chains – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Portra 400 Warm

Old Trolley Building – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Portra 400 Warm”

This Kodak Portra 400 Warm recipe came about after the Kyle McDougall Portra-Style comparison article. These settings are an attempt to get closer to Kyle’s preset aesthetic. Some film simulation recipes are good for everyday use, while some are good only in the right situations. This is one falls into the latter category, I think. This recipe isn’t for everyone or every situation, but for some people in the right situations, this recipe will be greatly loved! I think it looks best in sunny daylight, but can produce interesting results occasionally in other lighting situations, too. Thank you to Ryan for helping out with this!

One film can have many different looks depending on how it’s shot, developed, and scanned or printed. This Kodak Portra 400 Warm film simulation recipe is an alternative aesthetic. Portra 400 was introduced by Kodak in 1998, and was redesigned in 2006 and again in 2010. As the name implies, it’s intended for portrait photography, but can be used for many other types of photography. It’s similar to Portra 160, but with more contrast, saturation and grain. Believe it or not, ISO 400 was considered “high ISO” by many photographers back in the film days, and Portra 400 was one of the absolute best “high ISO” color films ever made.

Evening Chair – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Portra 400 Warm”

If you like my other Portra recipes, you might like this one, too. It uses Clarity, which slows down the camera considerably—I hope that Fujifilm speeds this up with a firmware update at some point. This recipe is only compatible with the latest Fujifilm X-Trans IV cameras: the X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, and X-E4. This was a Patron early-access recipe on the Fuji X Weekly App, so if you are a Patron you’ve had access to this Kodak Portra 400 Warm recipe for awhile—there’s now a new early-access recipe in its place, so be sure to check that out!

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -2
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: 5500K, 0 Red & -7 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Kodak Portra 400 Warm” film simulation recipe:

Dumpster, Truck – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Beer & Wings – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Bright Yellow House – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Western Structure – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Turn of the Century – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Train Bridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
New Holland – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Food Field – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Sunlight in the Forest – Sundance, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Leaves Below Tree – Sundance, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Wispy Grass – Sundance, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Pond Creek – Sundance, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Live From South Africa: SOOC – A Fuji X Weekly Collaboration with Tame Your Fujifilm

Join Ritchie Roesch (Fuji X Weekly) and Nathalie Boucry (Tame Your Fujifilm) this Thursday (7/8/21) at 11:00 am Mountain Standard Time for a live interactive broadcast called SOOC where we’ll talk about Fujifilm camera settings and film simulation recipes! In Season 01 Episode 01 we’ll discuss the Kodachrome II film simulation recipe.

Nathalie Boucry is an official Fujifilm-X Photographer from Johannesburg, South Africa, who specializes in corporate event, portraiture, and lifestyle photography. She’s also an official Instax Ambassador. Nathalie is the creator and host of the Tame Your Fujifilm educational series.

SOOC is a collaboration between Tame Your Fujifilm and Fuji X Weekly. It will be a monthly live video series, with each episode focused on a different film simulation recipe. It will be a fun and educational experience where we will not only talk about Fujifilm camera settings, but also answer your questions. This is an interactive program, which means that we need your participation! Mark your calendar and be sure to tune in!

You can find Episode 01 below, but in order to interact, you’ll want to jump onto YouTube or Facebook, where you can leave comments, some of which will be incorporated into the show. The broadcast will begin at 10 am Pacific Time, 11 am Mountain Time, 12 pm Central Time, and 1 pm Eastern Time. Wherever you are in the world, I hope that you can join us. See you this Thursday!

Help us get the word out, and share this post or the video above on your social media channels! I appreciate your support, and I look forward to hearing from you on Thursday!

Two Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipes: Expired Slide + Expired Slide v2

United Carrier – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Expired Slide”
United Carrier – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Expired Slide v2”

I set out to recreate the look of expired slide film. Perhaps expired is the wrong term, because the aesthetic that I was after is more like mishandled slide film—not stored correctly or developed promptly. Maybe it passed its expiration date because it sat in a drawer for so long, or maybe it was in a hot car for a couple of hours, but, whatever the reason, it definitely doesn’t look right.

Why would I want to create this look? Because it’s an interesting vintage aesthetic that was somewhat common in the film era. While most people would not want this outcome, interestingly enough, there are some film photographers (a.k.a. Lomographers) who do this kind of thing on purpose specifically because they want this look. The two film simulation recipes below are for those people seeking something different. Neither of these will likely be anyone’s “go-to” recipe, but if you want something that’s a bit unusual, these are ones to try.

The film simulation recipe called Expired Slide was actually the second one, as I created (what I now call) Expired Slide v2 first. I liked the original settings, but thought that it might be a bit too much, so I toned it back slightly. I posted examples of both recipes to Instagram and let you guys decide which one was best. The Expired Slide recipe won hands-down, but there were some who passionately preferred Expired Slide v2, so I’m posting both. The only difference is the white balance (and shift), otherwise they’re identical. Expired Slide has more of a red-orange cast while Expired Slide v2 has more of a red-purple cast. Both recipes (as of this writing) are only compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 cameras.

Expired Slide:

Forest Flowers – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X-E4

Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: -1
Color: -4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -2
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: 5500K, +7 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Limited 4404 – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Free – Boise, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Free Signs – Boise, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Construction Crane – Boise, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
10:45 – Boise, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Red Fence – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Tulip Blooms – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Dark Payette Lake – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Mossy Trunk – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X-E4

Expired Slide v2:

Caterpillar – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: -1
Color: -4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -2
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: 5000K, +8 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Red Barn – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Jump Pad – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Stack of Buckets – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
The Oaks – Ogden Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Lake Marina – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Two Dogs Swimming – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Jon Fishin’ – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Log in the Water – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Payette Lakeshore – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X-E4

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-Trans II Film Simulation Recipe: Yosemite Velvia

Photo by Joy Roesch – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X-T1 -“Yosemite Velvia”

On a recent trip to Yosemite National Park, my daughter, Joy, created a new film simulation recipe for X-Trans II cameras, which I’m calling Yosemite Velvia. Joy has made two X-Trans I recipes, Superia Xtra 400 and Winter Blue, but this is her first for X-Trans II. On this trip I let her use my Fujifilm X-T1 camera, and I told her that she could use whichever settings she wanted—this recipe is what she came up with.

I asked her why she chose these settings. She told me that she wanted the pictures to be colorful but without too much contrast. She decided on the Shade white balance because the forecast was for overcast sky, although it ended up being mostly sunny; however, she liked how it looked, so she stuck with it. Besides photographing in Yosemite, she also used these settings in Reno, Nevada.

Photo by Joy Roesch – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X-T1 -“Yosemite Velvia”

This film simulation recipe is compatible with all Fujifilm X-Trans II cameras. You can use it on X-Trans I and Bayer sensor cameras, too, but the results will be a little different (feel free to try, though).

Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -2
Color: +2
Sharpness: -1
Noise Reduction: -2
White Balance: Shade, -2 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 3200

Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured by Joy on my Fujifilm X-T1 using this “Yosemite Velvia” film simulation recipe:

Photo by Joy Roesch – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X-T1
Photo by Joy Roesch – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X-T1
Photo by Joy Roesch – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X-T1
Photo by Joy Roesch – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X-T1
Photo by Joy Roesch – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X-T1
Photo by Joy Roesch – Reno, NV – Fujifilm X-T1
Photo by Joy Roesch – Reno, NV – Fujifilm X-T1
Photo by Joy Roesch – Reno, NV – Fujifilm X-T1

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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