Fujifilm X-T1 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: CineStill 800T

Night Synergy – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “CineStill 800T”

This is my favorite CineStill 800T film simulation recipe. I created my first CineStill 800T recipe, which is intended for X-Trans III cameras, over three years ago. My next version, which is intended for newer X-Trans IV cameras, was published nearly a year ago. This X-Trans II recipe was one of the original Patron “Early-Access” recipes on the Fuji X Weekly App. In other words, those who are Patrons on the App have already had access to this recipe, and now that another recipe has replaced it, this CineStill 800T recipe is available to everyone! Early-Access to some new recipes is one of the benefits of being a Fuji X Weekly Patron, and a great way to support this website.

CineStill 800T is Kodak Vision3 500T motion picture film that’s been modified for use in 35mm film cameras and development using the C-41 process. Because it has the RemJet layer removed, it is more prone to halation. The “T” in the name means tungsten-balanced, which is a fancy way of saying that it is white-balanced for artificial light and not daylight. CineStill 800T has become a popular film for after-dark photography.

Pair – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “CineStill 800T”

Even though the film that this recipe is intended to mimic is Tungsten-balanced, it can still produce interesting pictures in daylight. It’s a versatile recipe, but it definitely delivers the best results in artificial light. When I photograph with my Fujifilm X-T1 after sunset, this is the recipe that I use.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +2 (Hard)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Color: -1 (Medium-Low)
Sharpness: 0 (Standard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: 4300K, -3 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 3200

Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured on my Fujifilm X-T1 using this CineStill 800T film simulation recipe:

Red Hatchback – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
We Care About Asada Nachos – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Shoe Repair in Disrepair – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Vending Machines – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Narrow Drive – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
2nd & Main – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
The Kaysville Theatre – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Park Gazebo – Clinton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Fall Branch – Clinton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Cut Off – Clinton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Find this film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-Trans II Patron Early-Access Recipe: Color Negative Film

Yellow – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Color Negative Film”

One of my favorite X-Trans I film simulation recipes is Color Negative Film, which has a white balance shift inspired by my Fujicolor 100 Industrial recipe. This new recipe, available as a Patron Early-Access Recipe on the Fuji X Weekly App, is an adaptation of the X-Trans I recipe for X-Trans II. It doesn’t mimic any specific film, but just has a more generic film aesthetic. It’s not an exact match to the X-Trans I recipe, but it’s pretty close.

The Fuji X Weekly app is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best app experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new film simulation recipes. These early-access recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many early-access recipes have already been publicly published on this blog and the app, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no app. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

No Swimming – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Color Negative Film”

If you have an X-Trans II camera and are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the app!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Color Negative Film” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T1:

Sunlit Leaves – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Green Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – Photo by Jon Roesch
Early Autumn – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Forest Trail – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
One Dead Leaf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Backlit Autumn Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Autumn Flare – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Changing Leaves in the Woods – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Yellow Shrub – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Trail to the Trees – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Water Logged – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – Photo by Jon Roesch
Little Purple Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Reeds of Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

SOOC Episode 03

I want to give a big “Thank You” to everyone who tuned in to Episode 03 of SOOC, a collaboration between myself and Fuji X-Photographer Nathalie BoucryThis video series is live and interactive, so I’m especially grateful to all who participated! You are the ones who make these episodes great! This really is the best community in photography.

SOOC is a monthly live video series, with each episode focused on a different film simulation recipe. It is a collaboration between Tame Your Fujifilm (Fujifilm X-Photographer Nathalie Boucry) and Fuji X Weekly (Ritchie Roesch). SOOC is a fun and educational experience where we will not only talk about Fujifilm camera settings, but also answer your questions.

Episode 03 of this live interactive video series was on September 9th. We discussed the Fujicolor C200 film simulation recipe, and took a look at the photographs that you’ve submitted. The SOOC Episode 04 “recipe of the month” is Kodacolor, which is compatible with X-Trans III & IV cameras. Upload your pictures here to be featured in the next video! Episode 04 will be on October 14, so mark your calendars, and I look forward to seeing you then!

In the video below are the viewer’s photographs, captured using the Fujicolor C200 film simulation recipe, that were shown during the show. It’s a short clip, so be sure to watch! I love seeing your pictures, and I’m honored that you submitted them for us to view in the show.

Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Portra-Style

Peach Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Portra-Style”

After Anders Lindborg shared with me his interesting discovery that D-Range Priority (DR-P) is essentially the same thing as Hypertone on Fujifilm Frontier scanners, I immediately went to work creating a couple film simulation recipes that use D-Range Priority, since I didn’t have any. Like many of you, I thought that DR-P was a feature reserved only for extreme situations, and not for everyday use, but (as it turns out) it doesn’t have to be—DR-P can be utilized all of the time if you want.

What is DR-P? It’s basically a tone curve intended to maximize dynamic range. There are four options: Off, Auto, Weak, and Strong. When DR-P is Off, the camera uses DR (DR100, DR200, DR400) instead, and when DR-P is On (Auto, Weak, or Strong), DR is disabled. When DR-P is On, Highlight and Shadow are “greyed out” so those can’t be adjusted—the curve is built into DR-P. You get what you get. DR-P Weak is similar to using DR400 with both Highlight and Shadow -2, but with a very subtle mid-tone boost. This recipe calls for DR-P Auto, and the camera will usually select DR-P Weak unless there is a bright light source (such as the sun) in the frame, such as the picture Sunlight Through a Tree further down below.

Tall Grass – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Portra-Style”

This “Portra-Style” recipe isn’t intended to faithfully mimic Portra film, but was inspired more by Kyle McDougall’s “Portra-Style” presets, which are, of course, modeled after Kodak Portra film. The Kodak Portra 400 Warm recipe was also inspired by these presets, and there are some similarities between this recipe and that one. I don’t know which is better, as they’re both good options for achieving a warm Portra-like aesthetic. For a more-accurate recipe, try Kodak Portra 400 v2. This recipe, which is closer to Portra 400 than 160, works best in natural light, especially daylight, although you can still get interesting results sometimes in other lighting situations. My “Portra-Style” recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: D-Range Priority Auto
Color: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: +3
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: 5000K, +2 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Portra-Style” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Jonathan – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Arrow & Cones – Sandy, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Northstar – Orem, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Summer Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Sunlight Through a Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Fence & Tree – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Cautious Nature – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Bridge in the Forest – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Yellow Leaves in Green Forest – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Log in the Forest – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Last Light on Dead Tree – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipe and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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New: Fuji X Weekly Community Recipes!

Can’t get enough film simulation recipes? Have one you want to share? Want to see what others are doing with their Fujifilm cameras? The new Fuji X Weekly Community Recipes page is for you!

I’ve noticed that a lot of people are creating film simulation recipes and sharing them on their social media accounts, but they’re easily lost and forgotten. I wanted to create a place where you can share your recipes, and where you can find recipes created by others. That’s the idea behind the Fuji X Weekly Community Page—this is a library of film simulation recipes created by you and for you!

This project has been in the works for many months. It’s been a labor of love. Web developer and Fujifilm photographer Daniele Petrarolo (website, Instagram) partnered with me to make this a reality. He really put a lot of time and skill into this. Definitely, if you need a website built, visit his page and send him an email! He’s also talented with a camera, so be sure to check out his pictures! Without him, the community recipes page would still be a long ways off and not nearly as good. Marcel Fraij, Thomas Schwab, Julien Sorosac, and others (including my kids!) also had a hand in making this project come to fruition. I want to give a big “thank you” to everyone who participated in this.

If you want even more film simulation recipes for your Fujifilm camera, or if you’ve created a recipe that you want to share, or if you just want to check out some pictures captured by others, be sure to visit the Fuji X Weekly Community Recipes Page! My hope is that this will become a great resource for the Fujifilm community. Be sure to bookmark it and check it often!

Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Scanned Superia

Brownie on a Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Scanned Superia”

After Anders Lindborg shared with me his interesting discovery that D-Range Priority (DR-P) is essentially the same thing as Hypertone on Fujifilm Frontier scanners, I immediately went to work creating a couple film simulation recipes that use D-Range Priority, since I didn’t have any. Like many of you, I thought that DR-P was a feature reserved only for extreme situations, and not for everyday use, but (as it turns out) it doesn’t have to be—DR-P can be utilized all of the time if you want.

What is DR-P? It’s basically a tone curve intended to maximize dynamic range. There are four options: Off, Auto, Weak, and Strong. When DR-P is Off, the camera uses DR (DR100, DR200, DR400) instead, and when DR-P is On (Auto, Weak, or Strong), DR is disabled. When DR-P is On, Highlight and Shadow are “greyed out” so those can’t be adjusted—the curve is built into DR-P. You get what you get. DR-P Weak is similar to using DR400 with both Highlight and Shadow -2, but with a very subtle mid-tone boost. This recipe calls for DR-P Auto, and the camera will usually select DR-P Weak unless there is a bright light source (such as the sun) in the frame, such as the picture below.

Big Grass Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Scanned Superia”

This recipe was inspired by pictures I found that were captured with Fujicolor Superia 100 film scanned with a Frontier SP-3000. Of course, how the film was shot, or even the scanner settings selected, can effect the exact aesthetic of an image. Even the same emulsion captured the same way and scanned on the same scanner can look a little different if the settings on the scanner are different (more on this in an upcoming article). I didn’t spend a lot of time trying to precisely match this recipe to those scans—it was more of a quick attempt, but I liked the results so I didn’t fine-tune it any further. It has a pretty good feel, I think, that produces pleasing results in many circumstances, although it isn’t the best for artificial light, and you might consider using Auto White Balance when not in natural light situations. This recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: D-Range Priority Auto
Color: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -3
Clarity: +3
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Daylight, -2 Red & +3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Scanned Superia” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

RADAR Peak – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Colorful Blooms of Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Last Red Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
White Rose of Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Yellow Country Flowers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Little Yellow Flowers in the Wetlands – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Suburban Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
No Parking Any Time – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Morning Flag – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Succulent Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipe and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

SOOC Episode 03 – Viewer Images!

I want to give a big “Thank You” to everyone who tuned in to Episode 03 of SOOC, a collaboration between myself and Fuji X-Photographer Nathalie Boucry. This video series is live and interactive, so I’m especially grateful to all who participated! You are the ones who make these episodes great! In the video above are the viewer’s photographs, captured using the Fujicolor C200 film simulation recipe, that were shown during the show. It’s a short clip, so be sure to watch! I love seeing your pictures, and I’m honored that you submitted them for us to view.

The SOOC Episode 04 “recipe of the month” is Kodacolor. Start shooting with that recipe, and upload your pictures here to be featured in the next video! Episode 04 will be on October 14, so mark your calendars, and I look forward to seeing you then!

If you missed Episode 03, you can find it below. There were 7 minutes of sound issues in the original airing, which have been removed from the video, so if you didn’t catch the show for that reason, don’t worry, it’s no longer there. I appreciate those who have watched already (and who stuck through the tech problems!), and I appreciate all those who are watching now. Thank you!

Find the Fujicolor C200 and Kodacolor film simulation recipes on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

SOOC – Season 01 Episode 03 – Fujicolor C200

I want to thank everyone who tuned into and participated in SOOC Episode 03! You are amazing! This really is the best community in photography. If you missed it, you can still watch it—I’ve included the video above. There were some technical difficulties, so I recommend skipping ahead to about the 7-minute mark.

SOOC is a monthly live video series, with each episode focused on a different film simulation recipe. It is a collaboration between Tame Your Fujifilm (Fujifilm X-Photographer Nathalie Boucry) and Fuji X Weekly (Ritchie Roesch). SOOC is a fun and educational experience where we will not only talk about Fujifilm camera settings, but also answer your questions. This is an interactive program, which means that we need your participation!

Episode 03 of this live interactive video series was today. We discussed the Fujicolor C200 film simulation recipe, and took a look at the photographs that you’ve submitted. The next episode, which will be October 14, will be all about my Kodacolor recipe, which is compatible with X-Trans III & IV cameras. I hope to see you then!

The Kodachrome 64 Moment!

Moment published an article, Why I Never Shoot RAW—Fujifilm Simulations, Recipes, and More!, that includes many of my photographs and even some of my words! I encourage you to check it out! Moment, you might remember, had partnered with me to give away CineBloom filters. I’m extraordinarily honored for the opportunity to collaborate with them on these projects, and I hope that we can work together even more in the future!

There is a mistake in the article that I’d like to point out. Check out the image below:

Caption reads: “Using Kodachrome 64 Recipe.”
This picture was captured using real Kodachrome 64 film.

The picture above was supposed to be an example photograph of the actual film, which I captured over 20 years ago using real Kodachrome 64 film shot on a Canon AE-1 camera. So it is film, and not a film simulation. A couple other mistakes are found in the recipe itself: Dynamic Range should be DR200, and Noise Reduction should be -4. But, you know, it’s always alright to “season to taste” a recipe, so maybe that is how they prefer those settings.

I’m super happy to have been included in this writeup! I’m stoked that Moment found this recipe to be a valuable resource to the photography community—so valuable, in fact, that they were eager to share it with their customers on their website. Honestly, I’m flattered. Thank you, Moment!

Why I Never Shoot RAW—Fujifilm Simulations, Recipes, and More!

Tip: How to Remember Which Film Simulation Recipe You Used

I get asked sometimes how I know which film simulation recipes I used for certain pictures. Especially when I take a road trip where I might use a number of different recipes, it can be difficult to remember which ones I used when. Honestly, I didn’t have a good method for this. I would limit myself to only a few recipes, and tried to avoid using similar-looking recipes on the same day. If I still didn’t remember, I would go back into the camera and display the picture information to give myself a clue. However, I recently became aware of a much better method.

In Episode 02 of SOOC, X-Photographer Nathalie Boucry shared her smart solution for this common problem. Whenever Nathalie is out shooting, when she switches to a new recipe, the very first exposure that she makes is a snap of her phone with the Fuji X Weekly App open and the recipe she’s using displayed. Then she knows that every picture after that (until she reaches the next image of her phone) was captured with that recipe. I began doing this myself, and it works very well. Yes, it takes an extra moment “in the field” to snap an image of your phone, and it does take a little extra space on the memory card, but it can definitely save you time (and sanity) later as you try to figure out what recipe you used for that picture.

First image captured after switching recipes is an image of the Fuji X Weekly App with the recipe displayed.
Now I know that I used the Positive Film recipe for this picture.

This is a tip that I know will be helpful to some of you, because it was helpful to me. These kinds of tips and tricks are what you’ll find in the SOOC live video series. Episode 03 is this Thursday, September 9. It’s an interactive program, and your participation makes the show even better, so I hope to see you then!

If you haven’t downloaded the Fuji X Weekly App, be sure to do so. It’s free, and available for both Android and Apple. If you are looking for a way to support Fuji X Weekly and all that I’m doing for the community plus unlock the best app experience, consider becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron (available in the app)!

SOOC Episode 03 Is This Thursday!

SOOC is a monthly live video series, with each episode focused on a different film simulation recipe. It is a collaboration between Tame Your Fujifilm (Fujifilm X-Photographer Nathalie Boucry) and Fuji X Weekly (Ritchie Roesch). SOOC is a fun and educational experience where we will not only talk about Fujifilm camera settings, but also answer your questions. This is an interactive program, which means that we need your participation!

Episode 03 of this live interactive video series will be this Thursday, September 9, at 11 AM MST (10 AM Pacific, 1 PM Eastern)! We’ll discuss the Fujicolor C200 film simulation recipe, and take a look at the photographs that you’ve submitted. Click here to submit your photographs! We really would love to see your pictures captured with the Fujicolor C200 recipe, and when you submit a picture you are entered into a drawing to win a one-year Patron subscription to the Fuji X Weekly App. We’ll also be introducing the next recipe, among other things. I truly hope you’ll join us!

While you are waiting for Thursday to come around, let me share with you a wonderful article by Nathalie Boucry (click here) entitle Not Lost, Verloren, which includes many wonderful pictures captured with the Fujicolor C200 recipe on a Fujifilm X-S10. If you have a few moments today, go read the article, it’s well worth your time!

See you Thursday!

SOOC Season 01 Episode 01
SOOC Season 01 Episode 02

Photoessay: Fujifilm X-Pro3 + 18mm f/1.4 + AgfaChrome RS 100 Recipe = A Photowalk To Remember

Rental boats at Lake Schluchsee. Photo by Thomas Schwab.

Thomas Schwab, who has helped create (and downright created) a number of film simulation recipes on this website, recently went on a 12-mile photowalk through the Black Forest in the beautiful German mountainside between Hinterzarten and Lake Schluchsee. The weather was “Octobering” (as Thomas put it), which means that it was overcast and rainy. Thomas carried his Fujifilm X-Pro3 camera with the new Fujinon 18mm f/1.4 lens attached—both are weather-sealed, so a great combination for the conditions. He used the AgfaChrome RS 100 film simulation recipe, which Thomas said is “the best for color photography on rainy days.” He “seasoned to taste” the recipe with Sharpening set to 0 (instead of -2) and Grain Weak (instead of Strong). He used ISO 640 for all of the images.

The adventure began with a train ride to Hinterzarten, then a hike down the Emil-Thoma-Weg trail. After visiting Lake Mathisleweiher, Thomas trekked through Bärental (Bear Valley)—thankfully he didn’t encounter any bears—all the way to Lake Schluchsee, passing Lake Windgfällweiher and a small unnamed lake on the way. The adventure ended with a train ride back home. This really was a photowalk to remember, through some incredible rural scenery!

The pictures in this article were captured by Thomas Schwab while on his mountainside adventure. They aren’t in chronological order, but they do tell a story. Thank you, Thomas, for allowing me to share your wonderful photographs on Fuji X Weekly! Please follow Thomas on Instagram if you don’t already, and leave a kind note to him in the comments to let him know you appreciate his pictures!

Through Bärental. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Houses in Hinterzarten. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Traces of forest work. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Forest work. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Lonely Path. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Stone steps in Bear Valley. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Big equipment in Bear Valley. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Between Bärental and Lake Schluchsee. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Small nameless lake. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Grass meadow. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Little leaves. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Raindrops on leaves. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Bee on thistle flower. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Leaf captured with large aperture. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Water droplets, at Lake Mathisleweiher. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Small blossoms at Lake Mathisleweiher. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Pine branch at Lake Mathisleweiher. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Umbrella at Lake Mathisleweiher. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
At Lake Mathisleweiher. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Boat at Schluchsee village. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Lake Schluchsee beach. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Lake Schluchsee from the village. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Blue boats on Lake Schluchsee. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Boat dock at Lake Schluchsee. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Dock on Lake Schluchsee. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Lake Schluchsee. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Glass bottle at Lake Schluchsee. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Old hotel in Hinterzarten. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Passing train. Photo by Thomas Schwab.
Train stop at Himmelreich Station. Photo by Thomas Schwab.

Fujifilm X-Pro1 (X-Trans I) Film Simulation Recipe: Kodachrome I

Not Filed – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Kodachrome I”

This Kodachrome I film simulation recipe is an adaption of my Vintage Kodachrome recipe for the Fujifilm X-Pro1 and X-E1 cameras. Of course, those two cameras don’t have Classic Chrome, which makes recreating a Kodachrome look nearly impossible; however, Thomas Schwab figured it out! Thank you, Thomas! You might remember, he also figured out how to recreate Kodachrome II using the PRO Neg. Std film simulation. While this recipe isn’t quite as close of a match to the original recipe as Kodachrome II, it does manage to capture the feel of Vintage Kodachrome, and is as close as you’ll get to that aesthetic on X-Trans I. Because it doesn’t have PRO Neg. Std, this is not compatible with the X-M1.

You might recall that the Vintage Kodachrome recipe is mimicked after the first era of Kodachrome, which was from 1935 to 1960. This Kodachrome was the first film that produced reasonably accurate colors, and, because of that, was the first commercially successful color film. It became the standard film for color photography for a couple decades, and was even Ansel Adams’ preferred choice for color work. The December 1946 issue of Arizona Highways, which was the first all-color magazine in the world, featured Barry Goldwater’s Kodachrome images. While the most popular Kodachrome during this time was ISO 10, Kodak also produced an ISO 8 version, as well as a Tungsten option in the 1940s.

Green Oak Leaves – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Kodachrome 1”

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2 (Hard)
Shadow: -2 (Soft)
Color: +2 (High)
Sharpness: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Auto, 0 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to -1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Kodachrome I” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-Pro1:

Green Lake – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Backlit Forest Leaves – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Joshua – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Chicken Soup for the Soul – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Books in a Pew – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Church Pew Near a Window – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Red Carpet Stairs – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Window Light on Floor – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Old Window – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Arched Window – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Steeple View – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Brick Chimney – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X100V (X-Trans III + X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Monochrome Negative

Windows Within Windows – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Monochrome Negative”

It’s been awhile since I created a black-and-white film simulation recipe. Part of it is that my favorite recipe is Kodak Tri-X 400, and I often choose to shoot with that. Another factor is that the differences between monochrome recipes are often much more subtle than color. For this, I didn’t start out with the intention of making a black-and-white recipe—in fact, it began with Classic Negative—and I wasn’t satisfied with the look, so I switched to Acros, and immediately liked what I saw. A few small changes later, and this recipe was born. It’s not modeled after any specific film, so I named it Monochrome Negative, as it does have a nice film-like quality to it.

The trick to this film simulation recipe is underexposure. I found myself most often lowering the exposure by 1/3 or 2/3 stops (many of my recipes often call for the opposite). Highlight set to +3 will keep the image bright, while the underexposure will deepen the shadows and provide good contrast. Obviously each exposure should be judged individually, so don’t be afraid to deviate from this advice.

Happy Birthday Glasses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Monochrome Negative”

This recipe was designed on and intended for the Fujifilm X100V, which has a newer X-Trans IV sensor, but because I didn’t use any of the new tools, such as Clarity and the Color Chrome Effects, this recipe is compatible with all X-Trans III & IV cameras. On X-Pro3 and newer, choose Grain size Small; on all other cameras, which don’t have Grain size as an option, simply select Grain Strong. If your camera has the Acros film simulation, you can use this recipe!

Acros (+Y, +R, +G)
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +3
Shadow: 0
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: 0
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
(Strong for those cameras without Grain Size)
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 12800
Exposure Compensation: 0 to -2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Monochrome Negative” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

1104B – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Withering Flowers Along a Wall – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
City Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Backlit Turning Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Pikachu is a Little Hungry – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Space Fish – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Release – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Geese by a Tackle Box – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Do or Don’t Follow the Crowd – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Approaching Storm – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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The Fuji X Weekly Moment – Update 1

The Fuji X Weekly Moment CineBloom Giveaway on Instagram is off to a great start! Many of you have already entered. Click here if you want to know how to participate, how to enter to win a CineBloom filter, and to see all of the rules.

I love the great stories that I’m reading—your Fuji X Weekly moments! For example, @xisperience shared in his post:

I have been able to capture some beautiful memories for me and my family using the recipes found on Fuji X Weekly, coming to a point where I no longer have the need to edit anything, I can print the photographs directly from the camera and I know they come out fantastic. So, in a way, your recipes have provided me with the freedom to focus on what’s important, and that’s the photograph itself and what it means for my loved ones. This is my #fujixweeklymoment, which is every time I release the shutter button.

@xisperience

And @rodolfo.mdn.foto wrote in his post:

Definitely a very cherished #fujixweeklymoment captured on my Fujifilm X100V with the Kodachrome 64 film simulation recipe found on the Fuji X Weekly App, kindly provided by @fujixweekly. What makes a Fuji X Weekly moment special? For me, it starts when I fill in the adjustments on my X100V. The moment really goes on when I start using that film simulation enough to keep it in the custom settings for a while.

@rodolfo.mdn.foto

There are tons of other great moments being shared on Instagram by you, and I love seeing them all! I invite you to take a look yourself, and to add your own (if you haven’t done so already—or if you have, add some more!). I want to read your stories, as they are very encouraging and inspirational to me.

Oh, and you might just win one of five CineBloom filters that are being given away!


Don’t have the Fuji X Weekly App? Download it today!

The Fuji X Weekly Moment (Plus: CineBloom Diffusion Filter Giveaway!)

What is your Fuji X Weekly moment?

Which film simulation recipe is your favorite? What location did you last use it? How has it changed your photography? When is the Fuji X Weekly App most helpful to you? Share with me your Fuji X Weekly moment, and be entered to win a CineBloom diffusion filter (details below)!

Fuji X Weekly and Moment are teaming up to give away five CineBloom diffusion filters! Yes, that’s right—you could win one of five CineBloom filters!

CineBloom diffusion filters are a great way to take the “digital edge” off of your photographs, giving them an analog-like feel. Diffusion filters have been popular in cinematography for awhile, and people are beginning to realize that they’re great for still photography, too. These filters pair especially well with my Film Simulation Recipes, and are a wonderful tool for the JPEG photographer.

The Rules

These rules are pretty simple, but it is important that you follow each step.

  • First, if you don’t already, be sure to follow Fuji X Weekly and Moment on Instagram (here and here). This isn’t actually a requirement to win, but it would be great if you would do this (hey, we’re giving away free stuff!). While you’re at it, feel free to follow us on YouTube, too (here and here).
  • Next, on Instagram, share a picture that you’ve captured using a Fuji X Weekly film simulation recipe on your Fujifilm camera. Which recipe? Whichever one you want—there are over 150 to choose from! State in the post description that you used a Fuji X Weekly recipe and which recipe you used. It would be great if you could mention the Fuji X Weekly app, because I’m hoping to reach people who don’t yet know about recipes and the app. Maybe something like, “This is my Fuji X Weekly moment. Captured on my #Fujifilm #XPro2 with the @fujixweekly Kodachrome II film simulation recipe, which I found on the Fuji X Weekly App.” There are no rules for the exact wording, so don’t sweat it. Say what comes naturally to you, because I’d rather you say something authentic. Definitely let me know what your Fuji X Weekly moment is and why.
  • Third, tag a friend, especially if you think that friend might be interested in film simulation recipes or photography. If you don’t want to tag a friend, tag a photographer that you follow on Instagram. Or tag a famous photographer, such as @stevemccurryofficial, @petesouza, @chrisburkard, @seantuck, or someone else like that. Be sure to tag someone, or even several someones if you’d like.
  • Lastly—and this is highly important—use the hashtag #fujixweeklymoment when you post your picture. If you want, you can include this in the second-step statement (for example: “This is my #fujixweeklymoment.”). Then post your picture to Instagram!

That’s it! Well, sort of. There are actually several more rules, which you’ll find below.

The Fuji X Weekly Moment giveaway runs from from August 21, 2021 through September 4, 2021.

There will be five winners. Each winner will receive a code that can be redeemed from Moment for one CineBloom diffusion filter. Winners will be randomly selected (this is not a photography contest). Enter by using the #fujixweeklymoment hashtag on Instagram—each picture posted with that hashtag is one entry. You can enter up to five times; if you post more than five pictures, you’ll only be entered five times (but feel free to post as many pictures as you’d like!). Please keep the pictures family-friendly/safe-for-work. Each person can only win one prize. Winners will be announced between September 6th and 14th (hopefully on September 6th) and will be notified via an Instagram direct message (DM). Void where prohibited. By entering, you agree to all of these rules, Instagram’s policies, and all laws that may govern this giveaway. Fuji X Weekly and Moment are not responsible for any rule or law violations.

“Per Instagram rules, this promotion is in no way sponsored, administered, or associated with Instagram, Inc. By entering, entrants confirm that they are 13+ years of age, release Instagram of responsibility, and agree to Instagram’s terms of use.”

Don’t have the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App? Find it in the Google Play and Apple App Stores!

Be sure to share this article on your social media channels to help get the word out! Thank you, have fun, and good luck!

Fujifilm X-Trans III + X-T3 & X-T30 Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Kodacolor VR

Inside City Creek – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

This film simulation recipe was an experiment. I started out with my Fujicolor 100 Industrial recipe, but instead of using a cool White Balance with a warm White Balance Shift, I did the opposite: I used a warm White Balance with a cool shift. After many adjustments to various settings, this ended up not resembling the Fujicolor 100 Industrial recipe much at all, but it does have a great vintage print-film aesthetic that I really like.

I wasn’t sure at first which film this recipe most closely resembled (since it wasn’t intended to mimic any specific film), although it seemed to have some similarities to Kodacolor VR. I already have a Kodacolor recipe, which does a great job at mimicking Kodacolor VR; this recipe and that one look somewhat similar, but definitely different. Then I ran across some pictures that looked very similar to the ones you see in this article, and it turned out that they were shot on Kodacolor VR film that had expired. So I think this recipe, while it does resemble Kodacolor VR, as well as ColorPlus 200 (which is a direct descendant of that film), it most closely looks like Kodacolor VR that’s been stored a little past its expiration date. Of course, one film can have many different looks, depending on how it was shot, developed, scanned and/or printed, and (in this case) stored, so this recipe serves as a nice alternative to my original Kodacolor recipe.

Leaning Tower – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

The Fuji X Weekly app is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best app experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new film simulation recipes. These early-access recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many early-access recipes have already been publicly published on this blog and the app, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no app. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new Patron early-access recipe is compatible with Fujifilm X-Trans III and X-Trans IV cameras. For those with newer cameras, set Color Chrome FX Blue to Off, Clarity to 0 (or perhaps -2), and I’d suggest Grain size Large, but use Small if you prefer.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the app!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Kodacolor VR” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

Summer Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Corner Through Leaves – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Stones & Glass Ceiling – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Glass – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Building a Building – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Small Spaces Between – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Twilight Telephone Poles – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Stoneground – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Goes for Gold – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Night Parking – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Doki Doki – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Escalators – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Downtown Buildings – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Coming Train – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Trax – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Waiting on the Platform – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Glass & Sky – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Tall Downtown Buildings – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X-T3 & X-T30 Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Portra 400 v2

Walking on a Bridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Kodak Portra 400 v2”

This film simulation recipe is a slight variation of my Kodak Portra 400 recipe. It came about after I made a Portra 400 v2 recipe for the newer X-Trans IV cameras, which was created after studying actual examples of the film provided to me by a reader. I wanted to create a similar modification for the X-T3 and X-T30, which became this recipe. One film can have many different looks, depending on how it’s shot, developed, and scanned and/or printed, so this isn’t necessarily a “better” recipe, just a slightly different take on recreating the film’s aesthetic. I really like this one, and I think you will, too!

Portra 400, which is a color negative film, was introduced by Kodak in 1998. It was redesign in 2006 and again in 2010. As the name implies, it’s intended for portrait photography, but can be used for many other types of photography. It’s similar to Portra 160, but with more contrast, saturation and grain. Believe it or not, ISO 400 was considered “high ISO” by many photographers back in the film days, and Portra 400 was one of the absolute best “high ISO” color films ever made. Interestingly, Kodak briefly made a black-and-white version of Portra 400!

Downtownscape – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Kodak Portra 400 v2”

This isn’t exactly a brand-new recipe. It was published as a Patron early-access recipe on the Fuji X Weekly App back on December 1st, so Patrons have had access to it for quite some time. Now another early-access recipe has replaced it, so this one is available to everyone! If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, be sure to check out the new early-access recipe in the app.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR-Auto
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -1
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Grain Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
White Balance: Daylight, +2 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Kodak Portra 400 v2” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

Blackberry Forest Evening – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Three Backlit Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Tiny Red Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Broken and Boarded – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Window to the City – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Lululemon – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Two Tall Buildings – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Hotel – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Two Cranes – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
A Downtown Cityscape – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Moffatt Ct. – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

SOOC Episode 02 (and Episode 03!)

Despite a little technical trouble, Episode 02 of SOOC was a great success! I appreciate everyone who tuned in, and for everyone who participated. You guys are great! And it was wonderful to see your Kodachrome II pictures! Here’s the link to submit your Fujicolor C200 photographs: click here. I hope there was something in the broadcast that you found helpful or interesting, and that it was worth your time. It was supposed to be 45 minutes, but it ended up doubling that! If you missed it, you can watch it above.

The technical difficulty that I had on my end is this: my Fujifilm X-E4 that I was using for this broadcast kept overheating. In my review of the camera, I stated that I thought a similar overheating issue to the X100V was possible. Up until this video, which was being recorded live, I had not experienced it. Well, now you and I know: the X-E4 is prone to overheating if left on too long. I’ll use a different camera for future episodes.

I don’t believe the Fuji X Weekly App 12-month Patron giveaway winner has stepped forward yet. Adnan Omanovic was randomly selected from those who submitted pictures. Adnan, if you read this, leave a comment or send me a message so that I can get you your prize.

Episode 03 is already scheduled! If you click on the video where it says “Watch on YouTube” you can then “set a reminder” so you don’t miss it. Otherwise, mark your calendar for September 9th. I hope to see you then!

Reminder: SOOC Episode 02 This Thursday!

As a reminder, Episode 02 of the live interactive video series SOOC will be this Thursday, August 12, at 11 AM MST (10 AM Pacific, 1 PM Eastern)!

SOOC is a collaboration between Tame Your Fujifilm (Fujifilm X Photographer Nathalie Boucry) and Fuji X Weekly (Ritchie Roesch). It is a monthly live video series, and each episode focuses on a different film simulation recipe. It’s a fun and educational experience where we will not only talk about Fujifilm camera settings, but also answer your questions. This is an interactive program, which means that we need your participation! Mark your calendar and be sure to tune in!

I’m really looking forward to Episode 02. Among other things, we’ll take a look at your pictures captured with the Kodachrome II film simulation recipe, and discuss the Fujicolor C200 recipe! I really hope you’ll tune in!

If you missed Episode 01, you’ll find it below: