My Fujifilm X-T30 Eterna Low-Contrast Film Simulation Recipe

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Gap of Light – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Eterna Low-Contrast”

After choosing my Eterna film simulation recipe for the Film Simulation Challenge, I thought it might be interesting to attempt a low-contrast Eterna recipe. I wanted to replicating the look of low-cost color negative film, but I didn’t have any specific film in mind, and didn’t do any of my typical film research. What I did do was play with the settings until I found something that I thought might look good. Even though Eterna is supposed to look cinematic, I’ve found it to be a great starting point for color negative aesthetics, and in the case of this recipe, it sometimes roughly resembles Fujifilm C200 and it sometimes (oftentimes?) doesn’t.

I almost didn’t share this recipe. I do sometimes create film simulation recipes that I don’t share, usually because I’m not happy with the results. There’s something not right about it, so I keep it to myself, and either shelve it or attempt to improve it. I was really on the fence with this one. On one hand it can sometimes produce really lovely results, and on the other hand it can be too flat and boring. It seems to require strong light and bright colors, and it makes something beautiful and soft out of it. Even outside of those parameters it can occasionally render a picture quite nice, but often it just delivers a boring rendition. It’s for those times where it might be the just-right recipe that I decided to share it, and hopefully it will be useful to some of you.

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Stock Photography – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Eterna Low-Contrast”

Eterna
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -2
Shadow: -1
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -4
Grain Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
White Balance: 5900K, -3 Red & +3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400

Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using my Eterna Low-Contrast film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-T30:

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Red – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Sunset In The City – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Vintage & Antique – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Been Better – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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No Trespassing – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Everyone Has A Cross To Bear – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Joe Shortino – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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The Good Stuff – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Shopping Cart Line – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Cart – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Fishing For A Laugh – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Sitting In The Evening Light – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Jo Cool – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Kitchen Towel Roll – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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R Is For Roesch – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Too Many Coffee Beans – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Third Wheel – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Backyard Shed – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Green Tree Leaves – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Cottonwood Tree Leaf – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Film Simulation Challenge – Roll 2: Kodacolor

My first “roll of film” for the Film Simulation Challenge was Kodachrome 64. For my second “roll of film” I choose my Kodacolor film simulation recipe. I “loaded” the “Kodacolor film” into my Fujifilm X-T30 camera, which had a Fujinon 35mm f/2 lens attached to it, and exposed 36 frames. The Film Simulation Challenge is where you capture 24 or 36 exposures using the same settings much like shooting a roll of film. It can be a fun (and educational) experiment to use your digital camera similarly to an analog camera.

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Frame 1: Taco – Layton, UT

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Frame 3: Sweet Job – South Weber, UT

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Frame 6: Smooths – South Weber, UT

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Frame 10: Big League – South Weber, UT

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Frame 11: Illuminated Top – South Weber, UT

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Frame 13: Setting Sun Over Suburban Street – South Weber, UT

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Frame 18: Users Own Risk – South Weber, UT

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Frame 23: Stop Voting Only One Way – South Weber, UT

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Frame 24: Red Stripe – South Weber, UT

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Frame 26: Hiding Behind The Tree Branches – Farmington, UT

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Frame 28: Colorful Urban Nature – Farmington, UT

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Frame 32: Not A Clock – Farmington, UT

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Frame 34: Moon Beyond The Maverik – South Weber, UT

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Frame 35: Gas At Night – South Weber, UT

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Frame 36: Night Pumps – South Weber, UT

Roll 3: Eterna

My Fujifilm X-T30 Kodachrome 64 Film Simulation Recipe

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Kodachrome Slides – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Kodachrome 64”

Kodachrome 64 is probably the most requested film that people have asked me to create a recipe for. Kodachrome has a long history, with the first successful version debuting in 1935 (film simulation recipe here). In the early 1960’s Kodak replaced that version of the film with Kodachrome II and Kodachrome X (film simulation recipe here). In 1974 Kodak made the final version of Kodachrome, available in ISO 25 and ISO 64 (and later ISO 200) versions. This Kodachrome was discontinued 10 years ago. Kodak also discontinued the chemicals to process Kodachrome, and nine years ago the last roll was developed. This film simulation recipe is meant to mimic the aesthetics of Kodachrome 64.

In the early 1970’s there was a movement to end Kodachrome. The process to develop the film was toxic and complex. Kodachrome is actually a black-and-white film with color added during development, which you can imagine isn’t a simple procedure. Instead of discontinuing their most popular color film, Kodak made a new version that required a less-toxic (but still toxic) and less complicated (but still complicated) development process. This appeased those who wanted the film gone, but the new version of Kodachrome was not initially well received by photographers, many of whom liked the old version better. William Eggleston, for example, who used Kodachrome extensively in his early career, wasn’t a fan of the new version, and began to use other films instead.

The photography community did come around to Kodachrome 25 and Kodachrome 64. Due to Kodachrome’s sharpness, grain, color, contrast and archival characteristics, this film was a great all-around option that worked well in almost any circumstance. The film became incredibly popular, and was found on the pages of many magazines, including National Geographic, which practically made its use a requirement. Steve McCurry was perhaps the best known photographer to extensively use this era of Kodachrome. He said of the film, “It has almost a poetic look with beautiful colors that were vibrant and true to what you were shooting.”

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Onaqui Wild Horses – Dugway, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Kodachrome 64”

I shot many rolls of Kodachrome 64, and a few rolls of Kodachrome 25. My favorite was Kodachrome 64 because it had a little more contrast and was slightly more saturated. It was a sad day for me when Kodak discontinued it. I was just getting into digital photography at that time, and in retrospect I wish that I had paused on digital and shot a few more rolls of Kodachrome. Kodak has hinted that they might resurrect it, but I would be surprised if they actually did because of the complex development process.

When I decided to attempt a Kodachrome 64 film simulation recipe for my Fujifilm X-T30, I did some experiments, and after a few tries I thought that I had it figured out. Excitingly, I snapped many frames with these settings, but then I figured that I should consult some actual Kodachrome 64 slides to make sure that it matched. It didn’t. Kodachrome 64 looked different than how I remembered it. I was close, but not close enough, so I went back to the drawing board. A handful of experiments later I got it right, which is the recipe that you see here.

Of course, the issue with all of these film simulation recipes that mimic actual film is that one film can have many different looks, depending on how it was shot, under what conditions, how it was developed, and how it’s viewed, whether through a projector or light table, a print (and how it was printed), or a scan (and how it was scanned and perhaps digitally altered, and the monitor). There are a ton of variables! Kodachrome looks best when viewed by projector, no doubt about it, but that’s not how Kodachrome is seen today, unless you own a projector and have some slides. While I don’t think that this recipe will ever match the magic of projected Kodachrome, I do think it’s a close approximation of the film and it deserves to share the famed name.

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Mayhem – Tooele, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Kodachrome 64”

I have Grain set to Weak, but I feel that when using this recipe at higher ISOs Grain should be set to Off. While I chose DR400, in low-contrast situations DR200 is a good Dynamic Range option. For X-Trans III cameras, which obviously don’t have Color Chrome Effect, this recipe will still work and will appear nearly identical, but it will produce a slightly different look. To modify this recipe for Kodachrome 25, I suggest setting Shadow to +1, Color to -1, Grain to Off, and Sharpness to +3.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +2
Color: 0
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +2
Grain Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
White Balance: Daylight, +2 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Kodachrome 64 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

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Shopping Cart Car – Riverdale, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Traffic Lamp – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Red Tricycle – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Hay Stack – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Pony Express Trail – Faust, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Wild Horse Country – Dugway, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Wild Horse Grazing – Dugway, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Lonely Horse – Dugway, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Wild & Free – Dugway, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Onaqui Horses – Dugway, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Spotted Green – Dugway, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Grassland – Dugway, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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In The Dust – Faust, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Roar Forever – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Jon In The Backyard – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Big Wheel – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Evening Tree – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Look Up To The Sky – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Lavender Bee – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Lavender Sunset – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Sunset Leaves – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Sun Kissed Leaf – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Summer Tree Leaves – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Jar of Coffee Beans – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Beans To Grind – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Sugar Dish – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Morning Coffee – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Processed by Kodak – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

My Fujifilm X-T30 Redscale Film Simulation Recipe

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Red Hill – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Redscale”

Redscale is a photographic technique where you shoot film backwards. Instead of shooting the film through the front, you shoot it through the backside. In order to do this, one must load the film into the canister backwards, or buy film that’s already been purposefully loaded backwards. Normally, in color negative film, the red layer is exposed last, for the light has passed through other layers and filters before it reaches it. When you shoot from the wrong side, light hits the red layer first. The results can be quite unique!

What’s interesting about Redscale photography is that the results can vary greatly, depending on the film, exposure and development. Most commonly, Redscale images have a strong maroon, red, orange or yellow color cast. Sometimes the color cast can be extraordinarily bold and sometimes it can be quite subtle. Even one roll of film can produce different looks depending on the light and how it was shot. Generally speaking, darker images tend to be more red and brighter images tend to be more yellow, but there are certainly exceptions to that. A Redscale image is easy to spot when you see one, but it can be difficult to strictly define the aesthetic.

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Peach Morning – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Redscale”

I was asked by Fuji X Weekly reader Aycan Gonenc to create a Redscale film simulation. He had developed one already and shared his settings with me, but was hoping that I might make some improvements. I made some changes and adjustments and the results are this recipe, so it is a collaborative effort. What I will say is that the settings can be adjusted considerably, and one can still achieve a Redscale look. Simply change the film simulation from Astia to something else and you will create a different Redscale look. The white balance can be dropped to as low as 7700K, and the shift can have blue added or subtracted. Any of the settings can be adjusted to taste. These settings are only what I felt would produce a good Redscale facsimile, and I believe it does that.

Astia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +2
Color: -2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Grain Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
White Balance: 10000K, +9 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using my Redscale film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-T30:

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Building Sky – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Cloud Around The Ridge – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Red Mountain – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Overcast Ridge – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Clouds Floating Above The Mountain – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Orange Hill Under Red Sky – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Westbound I-84 – Peterson, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Evening Freight – Henefer, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Wood Fence Roses – South Weber, Utah – Fujifilm X-T30

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Red Rose Fence – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Really Red Rose – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Pink Bud – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Floral Red – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Yellow Rose Gold – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Daisy Red – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Small Wild Blossoms – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Corner Trunk – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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T is for Tree – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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An American Home – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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299 – Coalville, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Red Engineer – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Continental Bike Tire – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Red Window – South Weber, Utah – Fujifilm X-T30

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Night Window – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Red Cross – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Tree Top – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Sunlit Leaf – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Russian Red – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Bolsey Orange – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Red Birds – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Red Eye Horse – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Girl & Hungry Horse – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Cat Cone – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Tractor Mirror – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Stucco Lamp – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Iced Coffee Cups – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

My Fujifilm X-T30 Faded Color Film Simulation Recipe

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Fading Memories – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Faded Color”

This recipe is a failure. More accurately, it’s a failed attempt at a certain aesthetic. It doesn’t look like what I was hoping it would look like. It’s close, but no cigar. What it does look like are faded color photographs from perhaps the 1950’s through 1970’s. I have some old issues of Arizona Highways magazine from the 1950’s, and these pictures have a similar look to what’s found in those magazines. You might have some old family photos that have faded over time and perhaps look like the pictures that this recipe creates. You can also achieve this washed-out “milky” look through darkroom techniques. Even though this recipe doesn’t look like what I was trying to create, it looks really amazing, and I am astonished that this look can be achieved in-camera.

What I was trying to create was a certain cinematic characteristic. I was asked by a Fuji X Weekly reader to create a film simulation recipe that produces a look similar to the aesthetic of the Wong Kar Wai movie Chungking Express. I had never seen this movie, so I had to do much research, and thankfully a lot of great information was easily found online. I discovered that the motion picture film used in the movie was Agfa XT320, and that it was often (but not always) push-processed, sometimes one stop and sometimes two. A technique called flashing was used a number of times in the movie, which involves flashing the film with light to give it a smoky, atmospheric, or faded feel, lowering contrast. It’s a type of double exposure, except that the second exposure is nothing more than a little light. Another technique that was used in the movie was to give different scenes a certain color cast using gels. Wong Kar Wai likes to create scenes with one predominant color, and so you will find elements in the scene that are the same color as the color cast. He used a slow shutter speed in the movie to blur motion. There were a ton of different techniques used, and so you can probably understand the difficulty of the task. You cannot incorporate everything into one recipe, so I had to make some choices and create a plan to try to achieve something that looks similar to the movie.

My idea was to attempt a recipe that resembled push-processed Agfa XT320 that has been flashed and has a color cast. I decided to use the double-exposure feature on my Fujifilm X-T30 and white balance shift to achieve this. For the second exposure, which needed to be white, I tried a number of things, including a miniature portable studio, but after some trial-and-error, I settled on a plain white 4″ x 6″ index card. I would hold it a few inches in front of the lens and make the second exposure. Auto-focus would never lock onto it, and I figured that a blurry exposure might actually be preferable. For the color cast, I found that one exposure should not have a shifted white balance and the other should. Initially I was adding the color cast to the main exposure and not the white exposure, but then I switched that and liked the results better for some reason. I used the 16:9 aspect ratio to make it a more cinematic shape. Unfortunately, I could never get the results to look quite right for Chungking Express. I think I was in the general ballpark, but not as close as I was hoping. Fortunately, what I did create was pretty interesting, so I kept shooting with it, except I used the 3:2 aspect ratio.

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Main Motion – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Faded Color”

To use this recipe, you must set the camera to double-exposure, which on the X-T30 is found on a knob on the top. You capture the main exposure, then you must make some adjustments for the second exposure. The white balance must be shifted and the exposure compensation must be adjusted. For the white balance shift, I found going almost to the extremes works well. For a yellow cast, choose 0 Red & -8 Blue. For an orange cast, choose +8 Red & -8 Blue. For a red cast, choose +8 Red and 0 Blue. For a purple cast, choose +8 Red & +8 Blue. For a blue cast, choose 0 Red and +8 Blue. For a cyan cast, choose -8 Red and +8 Blue. For a green cast, choose -8 Red & 0 Blue. For green-yellow cast, choose -8 Red & -8 Blue. The exposure compensation for the white exposure is a little tricky. A lot depends on how bright the white is (whether it has direct light on it or if it is in shade) and how faded you want the image to look. It takes a little practice, but the good news is that the camera shows you exactly what the results are going to be, and even allows you do-overs if you don’t like it. I found that sometimes 0 was good, I found that sometimes -2 was good, and often -2/3 or -1 was a good choice. Each picture should get individual consideration. The second exposure is a picture of something white, such as the blank index card that I already described, although you could certainly try other things if you find something that might work better for you. This creates a faded look that almost seems unbelievable that it came out of the camera unedited.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR100
Highlight: +3
Shadow: +4
Color: +4
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Sharpening: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Grain Effect: Strong
White Balance: Auto (use a shift on the second exposure)
ISO: Auto up to ISO 12800
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (main exposure), 0 to -2 (second exposure)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using my Faded Color recipe on a Fujifilm X-T30:

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Good Life – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Or Another – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Summer Santa – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Makeup – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Walking Without Wondering – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Bike Repair – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Transit Train Transportation – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Kid Bowling – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Instax Girl – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Guitar Cat – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Cracked Eggs – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Good Vibes – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Steps & Vines – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Lake Grass – Willard Bay SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Faded Daisies – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Soft Rose – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Summer Roses – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Red Rose Faded – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Dark Rose – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Big Red Ball Catching – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Tona – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Hanging Bulbs – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Wet Bloom – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Caboose Steps – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Breakboy – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Lake Boy – East Canyon SP, UP – Fujifilm X-T30

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Springtime Lake – East Canyon SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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East Canyon Reservoir – East Canyon SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

My Fujifilm X-T30 Fujicolor 100 Industrial Film Simulation Recipe

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Urban Binding – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Fujicolor 100 Industrial”

I get asked frequently to create different film simulation recipes, and I always put some consideration into those requests. I don’t get around to attempting all of them, although I do attempt many, but I at least think about how I might create a certain look. Even if I do attempt it, I’m not usually successful, as it just doesn’t look right quite often, so I go back to the drawing board when time and inspiration allows. On rare occasions I’m able to create a certain aesthetic quickly and easily. This recipe falls into the latter category.

I have to be honest, when I was asked to create a recipe to mimic the look of Fujicolor 100 Industrial film, I had never heard of it and knew absolutely nothing about it. I had to do some research on this film, and I found lots of good and helpful information. As it turns out, Fujicolor 100 Industrial is a negative film only sold in bulk in Japan, although you can purchase it from some camera stores who sell it individually. It’s actually re-branded Fujicolor 100, well, the Japanese version of Fujicolor 100, which is not the same film as Fujicolor 100 in America, although they’re similar to each other. Something interesting about Fujicolor 100 Industrial (and Fujicolor 100 Japan, which is the same film) is that it has a Tungsten emulsion (with a Kelvin temperature of 3200), but it is daylight balanced because the dye colors have been shifted to account for the cooler temperature. Weird, huh? Well, it turns out that you can do the same thing in your Fujifilm camera using white balance shift, and it creates a similar aesthetic.

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Backyard Daisy – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Fujicolor 100 Industrial”

I find that this recipe is especially good in higher-contrast scenes, although it can still deliver interesting results in lower-contrast scenes. It’s a milder recipe that doesn’t have a lot of saturation, although sometimes just the right amount, and it handles shadows and highlights well. It creates lovely pictures that are soft and not bold. It needs the right subject and light to stand out, but it can look really great in the right situations. It definitely has a low-ISO print-film quality to it, and resembles Fujicolor 100 Industrial film surprisingly well.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +2
Color: +1
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Sharpening: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Grain Effect: Weak
White Balance: 3200K, +8 Red & -8 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Sample photographs, all camera-made JPEGs, captured with a Fujifilm X-T30 using this Fujicolor 100 Industrial recipe:

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US Bike Lane – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Twilight Temple – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Broadway Me – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Three Stories – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Boston Building Reflection – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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The Corporate Ladder – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Their Bank – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Urban Sunset – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Partial Loaf – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Purple Zebra – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Leaves In The Sky – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Partly Cloudy – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Rosebud Sky – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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In Case of Fire – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Watching Television – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Little Feet – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Donut Eater – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Plastic Hand – SLC, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

My X-T30 Eterna Recipe For X-Trans III

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Kitchenscape – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

A couple of days ago I published my Fujifilm X-T30 Eterna film simulation recipe, which I have received a lot of positive feedback for. I have also received several requests to invent a film simulation recipe that produces similar results without using Eterna, for those who have X-Trans III cameras and don’t have access to that film simulation. Well, I did it! I made an “Eterna” recipe that mimics my Eterna recipe. It’s not a 100% match, but it’s pretty close, and don’t think you’ll get much closer without using Eterna.

There are a few settings that could be adjusted, so you’ll have to decide what you like best. I think Shadow should be set to +1.5, but since that setting doesn’t exist, you’ll have to choose between +1 and +2. I went with the latter. It’s a similar situation with Color, and I went with +3 but you could choose +2 instead. I think that an argument could be made that a white balance shift of +6 Red and -6 Blue is more accurate, so there’s another decision. You can make whatever changes you’d like to customize this recipe to your own tastes.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +2
Color: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening:+2
Grain Effect: Strong
White Balance: Auto, +5 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400

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100 North & Main Street – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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“Eterna” using PRO Neg. Std.

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Neon Reflection – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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“Eterna” using PRO Neg. Std.

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Taste On Sale – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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“Eterna” using PRO Neg. Std.

My Fujifilm X-T30 Eterna Film Simulation Recipe

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25th Street – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

Eterna is beautiful. Fujifilm’s most recent film simulation, Eterna, has a lot of potential for creating lovely color negative film aesthetics. Even though it has the lowest contrast and lowest color saturation of all the different film simulation options, I suspect that it has significant potential for mimicking many analog looks. It has a film-like feel to it.

Real Eterna was a motion picture film. You’ve likely seen movies and television shows captured on Eterna and didn’t even know it. While Fujifilm invented and intended the Eterna film simulation for video use, which it is quite good for, they made it available for still photographs on X-Trans IV cameras, such as the Fujifilm X-T30, as well as GFX cameras and the X-H1. Unfortunately, if you don’t have one of those cameras you can’t use this recipe. [Update: if your camera doesn’t have Eterna, you can use this alternative (click here)]

I wasn’t trying to mimic the look of any particular film when I invented this recipe. I was just playing around with the settings and really liked what I found. It has an analog feel to it. Initially the look reminded me of something from Nik Anolog Efex. As I used these settings, I found myself getting interesting results. Depending on the lighting and exposure, I was achieving different looks, despite using the exact same settings. Sometimes the results remind me of overexposed Fujifilm 400H, sometimes pushed-process Fujifilm Superia 400, sometimes underexposed expired Superia 800, and sometimes Superia 1600. Occasionally it doesn’t resemble any of those films. It’s not supposed to look like any specific film, yet it often does, but results vary.

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Gathering Raindrops – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

I have always included a typical exposure compensation in my different film simulation recipes, but I didn’t do that this time because you get different results with different exposures. You can select -1 exposure compensation and you can select +1 exposure compensation, or anything in-between, and achieve various looks. You have to play around with it and decide what you like. Also, while I have Auto-ISO set to ISO 6400, I really feel that the best results are found at ISO 3200 or lower. You’ll have to decide how high you want to go with the ISO. For those using this on the X-H1, which doesn’t have Color Chrome Effect, you’ll get very similar results but it will be slightly different.

Eterna
Dynamic Range: DR100
Highlight: +4
Shadow: +4
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +2
Grain Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
White Balance: Auto, +5 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400

Below are all camera-made JPEGs captured using this Eterna Film Simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30 camera:

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Fake Plants For Sale – Riverdale, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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Light Lens – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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Trapped Inside – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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Franklin – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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Wildcat Radial – Layton, Utah – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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Evening Orange – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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Cleanup Tools – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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Red Tile – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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Kitchenscape – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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Tops – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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Kodak 35mm Film – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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Longing – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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Ball In The Grass – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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Blooming Red Tulip – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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Wee Wet White Flowers – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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Daffodil Drops – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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Spring or Autumn? – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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Love – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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Siblings Playing On A Tablet – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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Joyful – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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Don, Walt & Mickey – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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Brick & Beer – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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Taste On Sale – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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Jarred Pig – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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Neon Dragon – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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Neon Reflection – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

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25th Street & Lincoln Avenue – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – Eterna

Fujifilm Provia Film Simulation Settings – Or, My Agfa Optima 200 Recipe

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Colorful Chalk – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

With the start of the new year I decided that I wanted to rethink my Fujifilm film simulation settings and make new recipes with each option. I wanted to start with Provia, not only because it’s the “standard” option on Fujifilm X cameras, but also because I’ve been asked many times to create a film simulation recipe that uses Provia as the base. I do have a film simulation recipe that uses Provia, but it’s definitely not for everyone. This one could actually be someone’s standard recipe on their camera.

I’ve never been a fan of the Provia film simulation on Fujifilm X cameras, partly because the film simulation looks very little like the film that it derives its name from. Curiously, Provia film actually more closely resembles the Astia film simulation and Astia film more closely resembles the Provia film simulation (although neither are close to being an exact match). I don’t think Fujifilm ever considered making the Provia film simulation resemble the film that it was named after or really any film, they just wanted to use the trademark name for their standard setting. The Provia film simulation is designed to give generally pleasing results to the masses. Some people love it, but I personally find it to be the least interesting of the color options available.

While I never intended to mimic the look of any specific film with this recipe, I think that it fairly closely resembles Agfa Optima 200. If you are looking for an Agfa Optima recipe, look no further! Agfa made many different films over the years. They were never as big as Kodak or Fujifilm, but they weren’t that far behind, either. Agfa Optima 200 was a color negative film that was introduced in 1996, replacing AgfaColor XRS 200, and was discontinued in 2005. I never used this film myself, but I have seen it in person and on the internet plenty of times, so I have a good idea of what it looks like. Even though I didn’t intend to recreate the look of a film with this recipe, the fact that it happens to resembles one is a very happy accident. Sometimes it’s better to be lucky than good.

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Morning Egg Bowl – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

I’ve found that this particular film simulation recipe looks best when using an ISO between 1600 and 3200. That’s not to say that you shouldn’t use a lower or higher ISO, because I certainly do, but for some reason that ISO range seems to produce the most pleasing result. I have flirted with the idea setting the ISO range to be between 1600 and 3200, but I have yet to do that. This recipe says to set ISO to Auto up to ISO 6400, but please don’t feel like you have to set it to that just because that’s what settings I typed out. As always, choose what works best for you and your photography.

Provia
Dynamic Range: DR100
Highlight: -2
Shadow: +2
Color: -2
Noise Reduction: -3
Sharpening: 0
Grain Effect: Weak
White Balance: Auto, -1 Red & -1 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all straight-out-of-camera JPEGs made using this Provia film simulation recipe:

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Coca-Cola Cans – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Bolsey 35 Model B – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Mercantile Coffee Cup – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Durable Nonstick Pot – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Oil Pastels – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Table Curve – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Window Grass – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Indoor Decor – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Blinded – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Shrub In The Snow – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Waiting For Warmer Weather – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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For Everything There Is A Season – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

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Fading Light On The Ridge – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 “Agfa Optima”

Fujifilm PRO Neg. Std Film Simulation Recipes

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Great Salt Lake Evening – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 – PRO Neg. Std

PRO Neg. Std is one of the least popular film simulations available on Fujifilm X-Trans cameras, so you might be surprised by the number of different film simulation recipes I created that use it as the base. At first PRO Neg. Std may seem flat and dull. It has the softest tonality of all the film simulation options, and it is one of the least saturated. Fujifilm modeled it after Fujicolor Pro 160 NS film printed on Fujicolor paper. It has a great analog print quality to it that can be quite appealing!

The PRO Neg. Std film simulation was inspired by a portrait film, so it’s no surprise that it is great for skin tones. By adjusting the settings, it can be made to resemble different negative films or produce different analog looks. I particularly appreciate how this film simulation handles shadows. Many of the different color film simulations that Fujifilm offers on their cameras handle shadows similar to reversal film, but not PRO Neg. Std, which has a negative film quality, particularly in the shadows.

Below you will find all of my different film simulation recipes that I have created that use PRO Neg. Std. If you haven’t tried them all, I personally invite you to do so and see which are your favorites! My personal favorites are Superia 800 and Pro 400H, but they each have their own usefulness and charm. Let me know in the comments which recipe you like most!

Even though the different recipes say X100F and X-T20, they are completely compatible with any Fujifilm X-Trans III or newer camera. For example, you don’t have to use the X100F recipes exclusively on the X100F. You can use any of my recipes on any X-Trans III camera.

Fujicolor Superia 800

CineStill 800T

Eterna

Aged Color

Fujicolor Pro 400H