Fujifilm X-T1 (X-Trans II) Ektachrome 100SW Film Simulation Recipe

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Windows & Reflections – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 “Ektachrome 100SW”

What I love about my Ektachrome 100SW film simulation recipe is that it reminds me of a film that I used to use. Just like the original Ektachrome 100SW recipe, which is compatible with X-Trans III & IV cameras, this recipe is identical to my Kodachrome II recipe, except that it uses Velvia instead of Classic Chrome. This version of Ektachrome 100SW is compatible with X-Trans I & II cameras, as well as Fujifilm Bayer cameras.

Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +2 (High)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-High)
Color: -1 (Medium-Low)
Sharpness: 0 (Medium)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Auto, +1 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 3200

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured on my Fujifilm X-T1 using this Ektachrome 100SW film simulation recipe:

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Instamatic – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Throw Pillow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Striped Pillow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Indoor Decor Near a Window – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Grass & Concrete – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Little Steps – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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February Forest – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Lizard – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Penguins On A Rock – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Swimming Penguins – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Coral Fish – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Fujifilm X-T1 (X-Trans II) Kodachrome II Film Simulation Recipe

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Rural Grass – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

One of my favorite film simulation recipes, and one of the most popular, if not the most popular, on Fuji X Weekly, is my Kodachrome II recipe. This version of that recipe is adapted for Fujifilm X-Trans II cameras, such as my X-T1. It will work on all cameras with an X-Trans II sensor, plus Bayer sensor cameras, such as the XF10, X-T100 and X-A7. Because it requires the Classic Chrome film simulation, it is not compatible with X-Trans I cameras, or the original X100.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +2 (High)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-High)
Color: -1 (Medium-Low)
Sharpness: 0 (Medium)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Auto, +1 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 3200

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured on my Fujifilm X-T1 using this Kodachrome II film simulation recipe:

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The Wetlands of Farmington Bay – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Pallet Dump – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Old Wood – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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February Thistles – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Francis Peak in February – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Succulents – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Bright Apple – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Kodak Film Canisters – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Bolsey on the Camera Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Longing For Another World – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

See also:
Fujifilm X-T1 Kodachrome 64 Film Simulation Recipe
Fujifilm X-T1 Kodacolor Film Simulation Recipe
Fujifilm X-T1 Ektachrome 100SW Film Simulation Recipe
First Fujifilm X-T1 Film Simulation Recipes

My Fujifilm X-T30 Dramatic Monochrome Film Simulation Recipe

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The Obscurity of Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Dramatic Monochrome”

A couple of weeks ago when I was discussing the possibility of Fujifilm creating a black-and-white only camera, something that I came to learn by accident is that the Monochrome film simulation is pretty darn good. On X-Trans III & IV cameras, I have always used the Acros film simulation because it is beautiful and has a film-like quality to it. But there’s something about the “old-fashioned” Monochrome film simulation that’s nice, as well. I had never made a Monochrome film simulation for X-Trans III & IV cameras, so I set out to do so.

At first I wasn’t sure exactly what I wanted, so I decided that the best starting point was to revisit the iconic photographs of the great photographers from the 1930’s, ’40’s and ’50’s—people like Ansel Adams, Andre Kertesz, Robert Doisneau, Weegee, Pual Strand, Elliott Erwitt and others. I realized that I was drawn to the high-contrast pictures that these photographers had created. I wanted to create a recipe that mimics that look in-camera. These settings, which I call Dramatic Monochrome, are what resulted from that.

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Francis Peak – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Dramatic Monochrome”

For those with X-Trans III sensors, which don’t have the Color Chrome Effect, you’ll get similar results, but it won’t be quite as dramatic. The difference isn’t very big, so don’t worry about it. I would consider using +2 for Sharpness on X-Trans III instead of +3. On X-Trans IV cameras, you could give a +1 toning for a subtle warm look, such as what would happen if you gave a print a quick Sepia bath.

Monochrome (+Y, +R, +G)
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +4
Shadow: +4
Grain: Strong
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Toning: 0
Sharpening: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)
ISO: Auto up to ISO 12800

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Dramatic Monochrome film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

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Chair Near a Window – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Shadow Ware – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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White Pillow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Santa Fe – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Young Piano Hands – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Clouds Above The Snow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Wasatch Ridge Winter – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Lines In The Snow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Clouds Over The Frosted Hill – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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White Beyond Dark – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Frosted – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Darkness & Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

My Fujifilm X-T1 (X-Trans II) Kodacolor Film Simulation Recipe

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Man in Red – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodacolor”

Yesterday I published my Kodachrome 64 recipe for X-Trans II cameras, such as my Fujifilm X-T1, and today I will share with you my Kodacolor recipe for X-Trans II! Because this Kodacolor recipe requires the Classic Chrome film simulation, those with X-Trans I cameras can’t use it, but those with X-Trans II or Bayer sensor cameras can. While I got the overall aesthetic pretty darn close to the original Kodacolor recipe for X-Trans III and IV, the one thing that I wish I could change is the grain. Newer Fujifilm cameras have faux grain options, but older ones don’t. If you want to mimic the grain in-camera, your best option is to use a higher ISO, such as 3200 or 6400, and let the digital noise act as faux grain. Otherwise, I’m quite pleased with how this Kodacolor film simulation recipe turned out.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1 (Medium-High)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-High)
Color: -2 (Low)
Sharpness: 0 (Medium)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: 6300K, -3 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Kodacolor recipe on my Fujifilm X-T1:

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Front Runner – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Fro – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Cross at Crosswalks – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Look Both Ways – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Pipe – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Rusty Shadows – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Stop by the Rack – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Nord’s Stop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Mall Across the Mud – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Pond Among Reeds – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Grass on the Water – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Lake Reflection – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Antelope Island Beyond Farmington Bay – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Camera Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Green is Good for My Soul – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

My Fujifilm X-T1 (X-Trans II) Kodachrome 64 Film Simulation Recipe

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Sun Roof – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodachrome 64”

One of my favorite film simulation recipes is Kodachrome 64. It’s also one of the most popular recipes on Fuji X Weekly. Those with X-Trans III and IV cameras, such as the Fujifilm X-T30 that I created it on, have been enjoying it since August, but those with X-Trans II cameras—X-T1, X-T10, X-E2, X-E2s, X100T, and X70—have been left out of the fun. Those with Bayer sensor cameras, such as the X-T100, XF10, X-A7, etc., have been out of luck, too. That all changes, starting now. I have cracked the code, and created a Kodachrome 64 recipe for my X-Trans II camera! Unfortunately, it won’t work on the X100, X100S, X-E1 or X-Pro1 because it requires the Classic Chrome film simulation, which those cameras don’t have. But those who own a Fujifilm X-Trans II or Bayer camera, which do have Classic Chrome, I’m sure will appreciate this Kodachrome 64 recipe.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2 (High)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-High)
Color: 0 (Medium)
Sharpness: 0 (Medium)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Kodachrome 64 recipe on my Fujifilm X-T1:

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Watered Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Reflection in the Grass – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Reed Grass – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Reeds In Water – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Sisters on a Bridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Red Mustang – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Wrangler – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Parking Lot Sunset – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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January Evening Hill – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Rooftop Birds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Suburban Silver Lining – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Coffee Cup – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Prerequisite – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Yellow Pillows – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Smiling Jon – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

See also: First three Fujifilm X-T1 Film Simulation Recipes

First Fujifilm X-T1 Film Simulation Recipes

Fujifilm X-T1 Blog

I’ve had my Fujifilm X-T1 for less than two weeks. I plan to create many different film simulation recipes for it, but that takes time, so they’ll likely trickle out over the coming months. I did create three film simulation recipes, which you’ll find below. I like to mimic the aesthetic of vintage films with in-camera JPEG settings, as I learned photography in the film era. These three X-T1 recipes aren’t intended to mimic the look of any particular film; I just like how they look.

The in-camera JPEG options on the X-T1, which has an X-Trans II sensor, are different and much more limited than X-Trans IV or even X-Trans III cameras. Fujifilm continues to provide more and better features to achieve desired looks straight out of camera. While the X-T1 doesn’t have as many options, it’s still possible to get very nice pictures right out of the camera, no post-processing needed. Actually, sometimes it’s nice to have fewer choices as it makes things more simple.

Even though these recipes were created on a Fujifilm X-T1, they’re compatible with all X-Trans II cameras, such as the X100T, X-E2, and X-T10, as well as Fujifilm Bayer cameras, like the XF10, X-T100, and X-A7. The Velvia and Monochrome recipes are compatible with X-Trans I cameras, such as the X-Pro1, X100S and X-E1. I should also point out that my Fujifilm XF10 film simulation recipes are compatible with the X-T1 and other X-Trans II cameras.

Some of you have been asking me to create recipes that are compatible with the older models for some time now, and I’m happy to finally be able to share some. You’ve waited awhile! These three film simulations are just the beginning for the X-T1. I will be creating more. I hope to recreate some of my other looks with the X-Trans II sensor, but we’ll see how that goes. Some future recipes might require unconventional approaches. I can’t wait to see what I come up with! In the meantime, enjoy the recipes below.

Classic Chrome

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Praying the Order is Right – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Film Simulation: Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR200
White Balance: Auto, -1 Red & -1 Blue
Color: +2 (High)
Highlight: +1 (Medium-High)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-High)
Sharpness: 0 (STD)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200

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Rural Road In Winter – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Winter Boxcar – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Flaming Lemon – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Joyful Dining – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Opening a Soda Bottle – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Egg, Bowl & Rice – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Grill Fire – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Velvia

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Pink Penguin – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Film Simulation: Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR200
White Balance: Auto, 0 Red & -2 Blue
Color: +2 (High)
Highlight: -1 (Medium-Low)
Shadow: -1 (Medium-Low)
Sharpness : 0 (STD)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200

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Kobe Cold – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Sushi Lamp – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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For Goodness Sake – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Anchored Caboose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Red In The Woods – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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When The Season Is All Wrong – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Rudy Drain Winter – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Monochrome

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Rebuilt 24 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Film Simulation: Monochrome (+Y, +R, +G)
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1 (Medium-High)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-High)
Sharpness : +1 (Medium -Hard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400

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Monochrome Lines – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Metal – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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When Life Gives You Lemons – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Soup – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Jo With Chopsticks – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Drinking Soup – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Eating Rice – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

10 Most Popular Film Simulation Recipes of 2019

Arizona Highways Magazine

Shot on a Fujifilm X-T30 using my Vintage Kodachrome film simulation recipe.

It’s the new year, and that means reviewing last year, and making “top lists” of everything under the sun from the previous 12 months on this blog. Most popular posts. Top favorite pictures. You get the idea. That’s what I’ve done in the past, and besides, everyone else is doing it. Actually, this article will be the only one on Fuji X Weekly this January. Well, I’m not promising, as I reserve the right to change my mind, but for now, my only top list will be this post, where I will share the most popular film simulation recipes for Fujifilm cameras from 2019.

I determined which film simulation recipes were the most popular by the number of page views each one received last year. Which article was seen the most during 2019 is what determines the popularity for the purpose of this post. That doesn’t mean more people are using it or more images were captured with it, just that more people viewed the recipe. Also, not every film simulation recipe was around the whole year. Some were made not very long ago and are at a strong disadvantage to make this list.

I was surprised by how many views a few of these film simulation recipes had. The top five were expected, but some of the others were not. Let me know in the comments which one is your favorite! Also, let me know which recipe that didn’t make this list is your favorite. I hope that your holidays were wonderful. May 2020 be a fantastic year for you!

#10. Cinestill 800T
#9. X100F “Eterna”
#8. Ektar 100
#7. Eterna
#6. Fujicolor Superia 800
#5. Kodachrome 64
#4. Kodak Portra 400
#3. Classic Chrome
#2. Vintage Kodachrome
#1. Kodachrome II

Comparing “Classic Negative” and “Color Negative” Film Simulation Recipes

Someone asked me what the differences are between my “Classic Negative” film simulation recipe and my “Color Negative” film simulation recipe. They’re pretty similar, but they’re not exactly identical. I thought it would be helpful to see them side-by-side, so I applied my “Color Negative” recipe using the in-camera RAW converter on my Fujifilm X-T30 to a few recent exposures that I had captured using my “Classic Negative” recipe. Check them out:

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“Classic Negative”

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“Color Negative”

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“Classic Negative”

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“Color Negative”

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“Classic Negative”

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“Color Negative”

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“Classic Negative”

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“Color Negative”

As you can see, while they’re quite similar, the “Color Negative” recipe is more saturated, has a tad more contrast, and is a little warmer with a bit more red. The “Classic Negative” recipe is slightly more bland, but with a nice vintage negative-film aesthetic. So which film simulation recipe do you like better, “Classic Negative” or “Color Negative”? Let me know in the comments!

Film Simulation Challenge –Roll 4: Classic Negative (with Ree Drummond)

Back in August I introduced the Film Simulation Challenge, which is where you pick one film simulation recipe and shoot either 24 or 36 frames before changing settings. It’s kind of like loading your camera with a roll of film, and you are stuck with whatever film you loaded until that roll is completely exposed. This challenge is the digital equivalent of that analog issue. I thought it would be a fun experiment to encourage photographic vision while sharing the joy of Fujifilm X cameras.

The “film” that I loaded into my Fujifilm X-T30 was a 36 exposure “roll” of my new “Classic Negative” film simulation recipe. This recipe is the closest that I could come to matching the new film simulation of the same name that’s on the X-Pro3, but I have to admit, it’s not a complete match. The Classic Negative film simulation changes depending on the light and how you expose it, which is different than the other film simulations. I don’t think it’s possible to create an exact match, but hopefully my “Classic Negative” recipe is at least in the general ballpark. Or, if it isn’t, I hope that some of you appreciate it nonetheless.

My wife, Amanda, is a big fan of Ree Drummond (also known as The Pioneer Woman). She’s a famous blogger, author and television personality best known for her cooking recipes. She has a store, restaurant and bakery in Oklahoma, which my wife and I visited two summers ago. Ree has a new cookbook, and she’s been traveling the country doing book signings. Amanda insisted that we go so that we could meet her, and so we did! We stood in line for almost an hour in order to have a thirty second conversation with her. It was a very quick meet-and-greet that seemed like it was over before it even began. What you might not know is that Ree’s a pretty good photographer, and I was able to suggest that she create a photojournal book of her ranch that features her black-and-white photographs. She replied that she needs to get the pictures off her SD Card first.

I made 36 exposures using my “Classic Negative” film simulation, and most were of this event, especially while waiting in line. The lighting inside the bookstore was terrible, with some crazy mixed artificial lights, and this recipe wasn’t a good choice for it. I did reprocess in-camera the RAW image of Ree Drummond, and I’ve included that at the bottom of this article. I used a Fujinon 35mm f/2 lens for these pictures. I hope that you enjoy!

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Frame 1: Pink Sleeve – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

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Frame 2: Sunset 218 – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

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Frame 3: Changing Nature – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

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Frame 5: Sweetaly Gelato – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

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Frame 7: King of Books – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

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Frame 8: Waiting For The Bus – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

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Frame 9: 15th Street – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

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Frame 15: Brick Chimney – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

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Frame 18: A Roof – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

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Frame 19: Waiting In The Waning Sun – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

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Frame 22: Rick – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

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Frame 24: No Trucks – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

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Frame 26: Salt Lake Neighborhood – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

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Frame 28: Ree Drummond – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

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Frame 30: Open – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

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Frame 31: Happy Amanda – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

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Frame 32: Bank On It – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

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Frame 33: Brews – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Classic Negative”

Reprocess of frame 28:

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Ree Drummond – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – PRO Neg. Hi

See also:
Roll 1: Kodachrome 64
Roll 2: Kodacolor
Roll 3: Eterna

My Fujifilm “Classic Negative” Film Simulation Recipe (For X-Trans III)

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November Morning – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 – “Classic Negative”

The Fujifilm X-Pro3 has a new film simulation: Classic Negative. This film simulation is supposed to mimic the look of Superia film. The Classic Negative film simulation is expected to make its way to the X-T3 and X-T30 via a firmware update at some point in the near future, but for now the X-Pro3, which is still a couple weeks out from shipping, is the only camera with it. I’ve already had a number of requests for a film simulation recipe that resembles Classic Negative, despite it being so new.

To be clear, I have absolutely zero experience with the Classic Negative film simulation. There’s only a small sampling of examples that I could find online. I have used Superia film before, but sometimes the film simulations aren’t exact matches to the film they’re supposed to look like. From what I can tell, in this case Fujifilm did a decent job of creating a film simulation that resembles the film.

Classic Negative is actually a little different than other film simulations. Fujifilm has increased the color contrast in it compared to other film simulations. How it renders the picture depends on the lighting and exposure. The darker the light, the lower the saturation, while the brighter the light, the stronger the saturation. In addition, warm colors seem to be a little more vibrant, and cool colors appear a little less so. Highlights seem to have a creamy quality to them, while blacks look a tad faded. This is unlike any other option Fujifilm has given us, so you can imagine creating a film simulation recipe that mimics this is very difficult.

Fujifilm X-Pro3 Blog

According to Fujifilm, this new film simulation has the second-most contrast out of all of them, only behind Velvia, while the saturation is in the range of PRO Neg. Std. I found it difficult to create a high-contrast look that doesn’t blow out highlights or create blocked shadows. I also found it difficult to recreate the look of warm and slightly vibrant skin tones while also creating cool and dull shadows, as you can only get one right. I tried to find a happy middle ground that’s not very far off on anything and generally provides a similar aesthetic. I hope that I succeeded, although I’m not completely confident in that I did.

I didn’t initially intend to share this recipe until I had a chance to see Classic Negative for myself. When the Eterna film simulation came out, I created a recipe for it for my camera that didn’t have it. Some time later, once I had a chance to shoot with Eterna, I realized that my recipe wasn’t as close as I thought or hoped it would be. I’m guessing this one might turn out to be the same. However, a Fuji X Weekly reader urged me to share it, even if it might turn out to be wrong, as some people might like it anyway. I hope that you do like it, whether or not it is completely accurate to the real Classic Negative film simulation.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +3
Shadow: +2
Color: -3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +1
Grain Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect: Off or N/A
White Balance: 6700K, -2 Red & +7 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs made using this “Classic Negative” film simulation recipe:

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Smile of Joy – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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November Red Shed – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Dormant Neighborhood Tree – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Icy Leaf – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Brown Cottonwood Leaf – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Brown Eye Boy – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Mixed Use Crate – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Backyard Winter – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Brown Leaf Pile – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Suburban House – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also: My Film Simulation Recipes