Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: September Summer

Peak of Sunlight – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “September Summer”

I get asked frequently to create Film Simulation Recipes that mimic various films, and occasionally the aesthetic of specific photographers. In the case of this recipe, someone wanted me to recreate the look of photographer Brian Chorski. While Brian’s images seem to have a cohesive style at first glance, upon closer inspection one can spot several subtle variations. After much research, I discovered that he primarily shoots film—both 35mm and medium-format—and he prefers Kodak emulsions, especially Portra 160, Portra 400, Portra 800, and Ektar 100. I believe that he uses a warming filter at least some of the time, perhaps most of the time. I think he tends to overexpose (a common color negative film technique), and (obviously) his scanning and post-editing play a role in the final outcome. Also, he shoots primarily in the warm summer months.

I believe that several already existing Film Simulation Recipes at times come close to Brian’s look (some more than others), including Kodak Portra 160, Kodak Portra 400 v2 (this one, too), Kodak Portra 400 Warm, Kodak Portra 800 v2, Kodak Ultramax 400, Kodak Max 800, Kodak Ektar 100, Vintage Vibes, Pacific Blues, Bright Summer, and Bright Kodak. I’m sure there are others, too. Still, some of Brian’s pictures don’t seem to match any of those recipes, so I came up with a new one. This recipe, which I’m calling September Summer, is intended to replicate the aesthetic of some of Brian Chorski’s photographs. It seems best suited for sunny conditions, producing warm images that will remind you of seemingly endless summer days (which are now waning).

Chill Vibes – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “September Summer”

This “September Summer” Film Simulation Recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras, but not the X-T3 and X-T30, unfortunately. I believe it is also fully compatible with the X-H2 and X-H2s, but I have not tried it to know for sure. Those with newer GFX cameras can use it, too, but it will render slightly different. I don’t think this is a recipe that most will use regularly, but I believe some of you will really appreciate it in the right conditions.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -1
Color: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: 0
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: 5500K, +3 Red & -7 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “September Summer” Film Simulation Recipe on a Fujifilm X-E4:

First Day of Fall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Saguaro Among Trees – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Dead Agave – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Bougainvillea in the Light & Shadow – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Trumpets & Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Empty Pot – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Summer Frog – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Intersection – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Little Leaves, Little Blooms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Cluster of Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Blossom, Hiding – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
September Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and nearly 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Max 800

Ice Cold Pepsi – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Kodak Max 800”

This Film Simulation Recipe is modeled after some prints I found in a box that I thought looked interesting. I didn’t initially know what film had been used, but after locating the negatives I discovered it was something called Kodak GT 800-3, and I had no idea what that was. After much sleuthing, I found out it was Kodak Max Zoom 800, also known as Max 800. The film was shot in 2006 (I believe by my wife), and it was the third and final iteration of the emulsion (this version was introduced in 2000). Max Zoom 800 was replaced in 2006 by the similar Max Versatility Plus 800 (which was around for five or six years before its discontinuation).

Kodak made Max 800 film for point-and-shoot and disposable cameras—specifically, they marketed it for point-and-shot cameras with a zoom lens, which exaggerated camera shake. It was a cheap high-ISO consumer color negative film intended for the novice. It had a large latitude for underexposure and (especially) overexposure, but color reproduction was a little different (some have said “bland” or “weird”) when compared to other Kodak films. Kodak intended the film to be printed on Ektacolor Edge paper, but my samples were printed on Fujicolor Crystal Archive paper (which certainly affects the aesthetic)—this recipe is modeled after my samples.

Winter Greenhouse – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Kodak Max 800”

This Kodak Max 800 recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. Because it uses the Classic Negative film simulation and Clarity, it is not compatible with the X-T3 and X-T30, unfortunately. For those with the X-H2s, it’s my understanding that this recipe is completely compatible and renders near identically, but I have not tested it to know for certain. Those with newer GFX cameras can use it, too, although it will render a little differently.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: +1
Color: -1
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -2
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: 7300K, -5 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Kodak Max 800” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Frozen Ponds at a Bird Refuge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Winter Gate – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Open Gate – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Icy Marshland – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
What Remains of Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Winter Water – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Frozen Marsh Pond – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Nature Trail – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Green Truck – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Santa’s Sled – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Neighborhood Path in Winter – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Trail Closed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
No Shooting Past the Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Pallets – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Inside Abandoned Shed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Walking Tunnel – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Farm in the City – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Barnes & Noble Window – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Building Top in Last Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Buildings & Palms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Backyard Garden Trumpets – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Illuminated Desert Shrub – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X100V (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Analog

Cotton On – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Analog”

I was asked to recreate the look of a certain photographer, and I noticed that a lot of their photographs had a Classic Negative aesthetic, so I thought it would be easy to mimic. It turns out that this person shoots a lot of film, including (but not limited to) Fujicolor C200 and various Superia emulsions, as well as digital (but not Fujifilm, as far as I can tell), using RNI and perhaps some other filters or presets. Nothing said what each picture had been captured with, so it became difficult to recreate. After a little frustration, I decided to select only pictures with a certain aesthetic to attempt to emulate—I believe they might have been captured on a Superia emulsion, but they might not have been—they might not even be film! I think I was able to create a pretty close facsimile to this person’s aesthetic… at least one of the many various (but still somewhat similar) looks that this photographer has.

One film can have many different looks, depending on how it was shot, developed, and printed or scanned. I do believe this “Fujicolor Analog” recipe mimics the aesthetic of a Fujifilm color negative film, but which exact film, and how handled, is uncertain. What is certain is that this is a very nice recipe that some of you will love! This Film Simulation Recipe was a Fuji X Weekly App Patron Early-Access Recipe; however, a different recipe has replaced it, and so now it’s available to everyone!

Noble Fir – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Because this recipe uses Classic Negative, Color Chrome FX Blue, and Clarity, it is only compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras (and likely the X-H2s, too, although I have not tested it). I believe those with newer GFX cameras can also use it, although it will likely render slightly different. Unfortunately, it is not compatible with the X-T3 and X-T30 or older cameras.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: 0
Color: -3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: 0
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: 6900K, -5 Red & +5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Fujicolor Analog” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X100V & Fujifilm X-E4 cameras:

Main St Market – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Backlit Bougainvillea Flower – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Cloud Behind Trees – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Pine Trunk – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Burly Ladder – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Red Lights – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Utah Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Pine in the Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Withering Blooms – Orem, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Peaks Above The Gap – Orem, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Arts – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Stop Spreading Germs – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Pharmacy Lift – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Find this film simulation recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Pacific Blues

Coastal Blooms – San Simeon, CA – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Pacific Blues”

Sometimes—like “Arizona Analog“—Film Simulation Recipes come together quickly, and sometimes—like this recipe—they don’t. This particular recipe has been in the works for over a year! I’ve made several attempts, and I finally feel satisfied that it is right—or at least as “right” as I’m going to get it. But what is it?

I’ve had a few requests to mimic the aesthetic of Lucy Laucht‘s Spirit of Summer series, particularly the Positano Blues photographs. Lucy is most known for shooting with Leica cameras—both film and digital—but she also uses others, and I wasn’t sure what she employed for this project. Recently I discovered that Positano Blues was shot on film, but (as far as I’ve found) she doesn’t discuss which film. I did find a reference (not related to this specific project) that mentioned she has used Kodak Gold and Kodak Portra, and that she digitally edits the film scans to some degree. She mentions using VSCO with her digital images, and I wonder if she also utilizes it with her film, too. When I first saw the pictures in this series, I thought it had a Classic Negative vibe—a film simulation that emulates Fujicolor Superia film. Lucy’s pictures are warmer than Superia typically is, but so much depends on how a film is shot, developed, scanned, etc., on how exactly it looks, and she certainly could have used warming filter. No matter the film and process used by Lucy, there’s a certain “look” to the Positano Blues photographs that is recognizable and beautiful—no wonder why people want to emulate it!

Coast Blue – San Simeon, CA – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Pacific Blues”

While Lucy Laucht’s pictures have a recognizable aesthetic, there are subtle differences between the images. Once you study them closely, you realize that some are warmer and some are cooler. Colors are rendered slightly different in some pictures. In past attempts, I felt like I’d get it “right” for one picture but “wrong” for others; however, with this final attempt, I feel like it’s possible to get close to the “look” of most of the Positano Blues photos. I’m very satisfied with how this one turned out, and I know that many of you will appreciate it, too. Obviously it is intended for a summer day at the beach, but it will do well in many different daylight situations. This “Pacific Blues” Film Simulation Recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. I assume that it will also work on the X-H2s and newer GFX cameras, but I haven’t tried it to know for sure.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: +3
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -2
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: 5800K, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Pacific Blues” Film Simulation Recipe on a Fujifilm X-E4:

Pier Feet – Avila Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Water Taxi – Avila Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Harford Pier – Avila Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Bird & Boats – Avila Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Bird ‘Bout To Get Wet – San Simeon, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Ocean Post – San Simeon, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Pacific Plants – San Simeon, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Rocks in the Water – San Simeon, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Central California Coast – San Simeon, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Grass in the Sand – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Beach Frisbee – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Sax at the Beach – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Surf Rider – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Lone Rider – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Two on the Wave – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Evening Wave – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Low Key

Cactus Spiderweb – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Low Key”

Fujifilm cameras have a feature in Advanced Filter Settings called “Low Key” that I recently discovered is based on the Provia film simulation, and can be mimicked. While this “Low Key” setting can produce nice-looking images, I felt that it could be better, so I set out to create a Film Simulation Recipe to serve as an alternative to it, with an aesthetic that I appreciate a little more. Specifically, I wanted a recipe based on the Classic Negative film simulation instead of Provia because I like Classic Negative better. My “Bright Kodak” recipe is an alternative to the “High Key” feature found in the Advanced Filter Settings.

Low Key photography is purposefully underexposing for a darker image. It works well when the subject is brightly lit, and the rest of the frame isn’t, so the image is predominately dark, and the brightly lit subject stands out in the otherwise dim frame. I hope this explanation makes sense. This “Low Key” Film Simulation Recipe and the Low Key feature in the Advanced Filter Settings work similarly, and produce nice results when used in the correct situations. While not for everyday use, some of you will certainly appreciate this recipe for when the light is right. I did not model this recipe after any specific emulsion.

Petersen’s Ice Cream – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Low Key”

This “Low Key” Film Simulation Recipe is fully compatible with newer X-Trans IV cameras: Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, & X-T30 II. Because it uses Classic Negative, Color Chrome FX Blue, and Clarity, it is not compatible with the X-T3 and X-T30. Those with newer GFX cameras can likely use it, too, although results will be slightly different.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +2
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -1
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Daylight, -2 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -2/3 to -1 1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Low Key” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Cactus & Palm Shadow – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Very Tiny Flowers – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Green Cactus Pads – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Spiky – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Blue Sky Cacti – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Bougainvillea Sky – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Light Bulb Evening – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Lit Leaves – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Cinderblock Wall Girl – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
oyride – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
The Queen’s – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4

Low Key Film Simulation Recipe vs. Low Key Advanced Filter Setting

Low Key Film Simulation Recipe
Low Key Advanced Filter Setting

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-E4 Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X-E4 Silver   Amazon   B&H

Find this film simulation recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Have an iPhone? Be sure to download the RitchieCam camera app!

New Fujifilm X-Trans IV FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Magenta Negative

Flag & Dome – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Magenta Negative”

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes. These Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many Early-Access Recipes have already been publicly published on this Blog and the App, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This Film Simulation Recipe is intended to mimic the use of a Magenta Color Correction Filter, such as the Tiffen CC30M, which reduces the intensity of green, and is used to combat green color casts. Back in the film days, using Color Correction Filters was common, but it is much less so now, since you can dial in very precise white balance adjustments for whatever the light is; however, you can still use these filters if you want to. Instead of using a magenta filter, you can use this recipe.

Because this recipe uses Classic Negative, it has a generic Fujicolor Superia aesthetic; however, it is not meant to precisely mimic any specific Superia emulsion. The inspiration actually came from a YouTube video by Cammackey, entitled Fujifilm X100V Recipes / Old Film Tricks. While this recipe is a little different than his, it is intended to produce similar results, just without the need of a Color Correction Filter, which his recipe requires. This “Magenta Negative” Film Simulation Recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, it’s available to you right now on the App! Don’t have the App? Download it for free today! Become a Patron to unlock the best App experience and gain early access to this recipe.

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Magenta Negative” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Wet Red Rose – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Flowers by a Rock Wall – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Waterfall in the Ozarks – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Staircase Waterfall – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Unexpected Canyon – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Chapel & Cannon – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Pine Above Rooftop – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Magnolia Flag – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Ozark – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Little Cloud – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Plaza – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Window View – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Spiderweb on a Window – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Abandoned Porch Seats – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Tree Prism – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Ford & Tree Shadows – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Steampunk Art – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4

Fujifilm X-E4 Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Natura 1600

Tree Blossom Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Natura 1600”

Fujifilm produced Fujicolor Natura 1600, a high-ISO color negative film, from 2003 through 2017. It was only sold in Japan, but it became renown worldwide as word got out about this wonderful film. A lot of speculation has surrounded it. Is it simply renamed Fujicolor Superia 1600? Many people think so. Is it slightly modified Superia 1600 for Japanese skin-tones? Some people think so. Is it slightly modified Superia 1600 made specifically for the Fujifilm Natura camera? Perhaps so. I haven’t found any definitive evidence to conclude if Natura 1600 is unmodified Supera 1600 or a slightly modified variant of it—if it isn’t identical, it’s very similar.

I have a Fujicolor Superia 1600 Film Simulation Recipe already, and it’s a recipe that I personally quite like. I had no desire to remake it, but (you know) one film can have many different aesthetics, depending on a whole host of factors, including (but not limited to) how it was shot, developed, and scanned. With that in mind, I looked at Fujicolor Natura 1600 examples that I found online, and from scratch (not using the Superia 1600 recipe as a starting point) I made a whole new recipe to mimic Natura 1600—not surprisingly, the settings ended up being similar to the Superia 1600 recipe. Alternatively, this could be called Fujicolor Superia 1600 v2.

Clown Truck & Geo – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Natura 1600”

A fun thing that I did for some of these pictures is set the ISO to 1600—I think the results are especially good at that particular ISO; however, it’s more practical to use a larger range of ISOs. So set the ISO to 1600 if you’d like, or set it to Auto (up to ISO 6400) if you’d prefer—I tried both, and found either to be acceptable. This particular recipe is only compatible with the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. If you have an X100V or X-Pro3 and want to use this recipe, I suggest setting Highlight to -1 and Shadow to +2. The results will be similar, but not identical.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1.5
Shadow: +1.5
Color: -2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -2
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: 5500K, -1 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Fujicolor Natura 1600” Film Simulation Recipe on a Fujifilm X-E4:

Carpet & Curtain – Flagstaff, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Crown Railroad Cafe – Flagstaff, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Dinner Conversations – Flagstaff, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Daily Specials – Flagstaff, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Dynalift – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Ice Cream – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Concrete Blossoms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Tulips for Sale – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Hazy Blossom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Evening Sun Through Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Flower Cluster – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Easter Egg Hunt – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Pine Tree & Rocks – Bryce Canyon NP, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Two Bridges – Bryce Canyon NP, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Fujicolor Natura 1600 recipe compared to the Fujicolor Superia 1600 recipe:

“Fujicolor Natura 1600”
“Fujicolor Superia 1600”

Find this film simulation recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X-Pro3 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Vintage Color v2

February Reaching – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Vintage Color v2”

This “Vintage Color v2” recipe is a modification of the original Vintage Color Film Simulation Recipe. In the comments, Thomas Schumacher suggested using Classic Negative instead of Eterna. Sometimes when you try a different film simulation than what the recipe calls for, you discover interesting results. Well, I gave it a try and loved the results; however, I made a couple more modifications. Because Classic Negative has a lot more contrast built into it than Eterna, I chose DR400 (instead of DR200) to help prevent clipped highlights. Classic Negative also has more saturation than Eterna, so I set Color to -1 (instead of +1). I also changed Clarity to -3 (instead of -2) just to soften it a tad. The results produced by this “Vintage Color v2” recipe can be absolutely fantastic!

This recipe has almost two different looks, depending on the exposure. You can reduce exposure a little—go almost low-key—and get a wonderfully moody feel. You can also increase exposure a little—go almost high-key—and achieve something somewhat similar to overexposed Fujicolor Pro 400H. You can get beautiful pictures either way. Or split the difference and still get excellent results.

Pillars – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Vintage Color v2”

This “Vintage Color v2” recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. As a reminder, Clarity causes the camera to pause for a moment after each shot. I use the pause to slow myself down, but if you need to be quick, and if you shoot RAW+JPEG, you can always set Clarity to 0, and add it later by reprocessing the RAW file in-camera.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +3
Color: -1
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -2
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: 7350K, -1 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs captured using this “Vintage Color v2” film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-Pro3:

High Rise & Moon – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
KeyBank – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Bronze Building – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Bank Above Macy’s – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Boy With Nerf Gun – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Fake Succulent on Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
House At Last Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Winter Bloom Remnants – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Frozen Pond near Sunset – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Grass & Frozen Waterway – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Wild Gold – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Backlit Marsh Reed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Vintage Negative

Vintage Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Negative”

This new film simulation recipe isn’t actually new. It’s been a Patron early-access recipe on the Fuji X Weekly App for awhile, so App Patrons have had the opportunity to shoot with it for many months. It’s been replaced with a different early-access recipe, so now it’s available to everyone! If you are an App Patron, be sure to look for the new early-access recipe.

I call this recipe “Vintage Negative” because it is based on some old photographs that someone shared with me. The pictures were old family prints that this person had found in a box. The film used was unknown, and it’s hard to know just how much of the aesthetic was from the film itself, and how much was from the print, which likely had a color shift from age. If you’re looking for an aged analog aesthetic, this recipe is for you!

Mountain Painted in Sunset Orange – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Vintage Negative”

The “Vintage Negative” film simulation recipe is compatible with all X-Trans IV cameras except the X-T3 and X-T30. If you have a Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, or X-T30 II camera, you can use this recipe. The newer GFX cameras can likely use it, too, although I’m not certain, and it will likely render the pictures slightly different.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +2
Color: -3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpeness: -4
Clarity: -5
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: 10000K, -6 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Vintage Negative” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V and Fujifilm X-E4 cameras:

Christmas Star – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Two Ladders – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Pine Needles – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Water Tower – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Troller Square – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Yellow House Evening – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Suburban Reed Evening – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Clouds Around The Mountain Peak – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Sunset Thistles – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Phragmites Shoot – Farmington, UT –

Find this film simulation recipe and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X100V (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Pulled Fujicolor Superia

Salt Lake Shorelands – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Pulled Fujicolor Superia”

After creating the Scanned Superia and Portra-Style film simulation recipes, which use D-Range Priority Auto, I wanted to create a recipe that utilized D-Range Priority Strong. You might recall that Anders Lindborg made an interesting discovery that D-Range Priority (DR-P) is essentially the same thing as Hypertone on Fujifilm Frontier scanners. In my own experiments, I’ve come to the conclusion that D-Range Priority Weak is more practical for everyday photography than D-Range Priority Strong, because, unless there is a bright light in the frame, DR-P Strong tends to be too flat, since it maximizes dynamic range. Undeterred, I set out to create a nice recipe that utilizes DR-P Strong.

I call this recipe “Pulled Fujicolor Superia” because it is similar to Fujicolor Superia Xtra 400 film that’s been pulled one stop. Of course, how any emulsion is shot, developed, printed and/or scanned has an impact on its aesthetic, and one film can have many different looks. I didn’t set out to recreate the look of pulled Superia film, but, in fact, it does look surprisingly close to some examples I found. It’s better to be lucky than good, right? I wouldn’t say that this is 100% spot-on for pulled Superia 400 film, but it’s not far off at all.

Break – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Pulled Fujicolor Superia”

Because this recipe uses the Classic Negative film simulation, Clarity, and Color Chrome Effect Blue, it is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. I think it works best on sunny days, but I did use it with some success in overcast and indoor situations.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: D-Range Priority Strong
Color: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: +2
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Daylight, -4 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Pulled Fujicolor Superia” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Packed Parking Garage – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Dee’s – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Salt Lake Shoreland Preserve Boardwalk – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Wetland Grass & Mountains – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Grass – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fence & Hidden Building – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Playing Pokemon – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Looking Through Binoculars – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
My Four Kids – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Jonathan at f/3.6 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Yellow & Green Grass – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Pops of Fall – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V
A Little Splash of Autumn – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Find this film simulation recipe and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Scanned Superia

Brownie on a Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Scanned Superia”

After Anders Lindborg shared with me his interesting discovery that D-Range Priority (DR-P) is essentially the same thing as Hypertone on Fujifilm Frontier scanners, I immediately went to work creating a couple film simulation recipes that use D-Range Priority, since I didn’t have any. Like many of you, I thought that DR-P was a feature reserved only for extreme situations, and not for everyday use, but (as it turns out) it doesn’t have to be—DR-P can be utilized all of the time if you want.

What is DR-P? It’s basically a tone curve intended to maximize dynamic range. There are four options: Off, Auto, Weak, and Strong. When DR-P is Off, the camera uses DR (DR100, DR200, DR400) instead, and when DR-P is On (Auto, Weak, or Strong), DR is disabled. When DR-P is On, Highlight and Shadow are “greyed out” so those can’t be adjusted—the curve is built into DR-P. You get what you get. DR-P Weak is similar to using DR400 with both Highlight and Shadow -2, but with a very subtle mid-tone boost. This recipe calls for DR-P Auto, and the camera will usually select DR-P Weak unless there is a bright light source (such as the sun) in the frame, such as the picture below.

Big Grass Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Scanned Superia”

This recipe was inspired by pictures I found that were captured with Fujicolor Superia 100 film scanned with a Frontier SP-3000. Of course, how the film was shot, or even the scanner settings selected, can effect the exact aesthetic of an image. Even the same emulsion captured the same way and scanned on the same scanner can look a little different if the settings on the scanner are different (more on this in an upcoming article). I didn’t spend a lot of time trying to precisely match this recipe to those scans—it was more of a quick attempt, but I liked the results so I didn’t fine-tune it any further. It has a pretty good feel, I think, that produces pleasing results in many circumstances, although it isn’t the best for artificial light, and you might consider using Auto White Balance when not in natural light situations. This recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: D-Range Priority Auto
Color: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -3
Clarity: +3
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Daylight, -2 Red & +3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Scanned Superia” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

RADAR Peak – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Colorful Blooms of Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Last Red Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
White Rose of Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Yellow Country Flowers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Little Yellow Flowers in the Wetlands – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Suburban Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
No Parking Any Time – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Morning Flag – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Succulent Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipe and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: AgfaChrome RS 100

H&M – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “AgfaChrome RS 100”

I was asked to create a film simulation recipe for AgfaChrome RS 100 color transparency film. Agfa made this slide film from 1984 through 1995, with an “improved emulsion” released in 1992. I never used AgfaChrome RS 100, so I have zero experience with the film. It was difficult to find examples of, and old issues of Popular Photography and Photographic magazines were my best resource. Despite the challenges, I was able to create a film simulation recipe that I’m very happy with.

This AgfaChrome RS 100 recipe renders pictures beautifully! It has a great vintage analog feel to it. People might think that the images are old film pictures that you scanned, and they certainly won’t suspect that they’re straight-out-of-camera JPEGs! I’m confident that this recipe will be an instant favorite for many of you.

Flower Garden – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “AgfaChrome RS 100”

Because this X-Trans IV recipe requires Classic Negative, Clarity, and Color Chrome FX Blue, it’s only compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 cameras—unfortunately it’s not compatible with the X-T3 and X-T30. I believe that it is compatible with the GFX100S, although results will likely be slightly different. If you have a compatible camera, be sure to give this AgfaChrome RS 100 recipe a try!

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: -1
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Daylight, -3 Red & +5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “AgfaChrome RS 100” film simulation recipe on my X100V and X-E4:

Bowl on a Shelf – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Parking Garage – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Below Deck Parking – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Smile – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Little Dragon – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Free People – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Towering Cloud – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Drive Slow, But Don’t Park – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Checkerboard – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Patagonia – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Green Grapes – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Blackberries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Pink Among Green – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Little Cherries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Permission to Park – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
One Way – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Honey Bucket & Trailer – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
We Are Open – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Park City Downtown – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Buildings in Downtown Park City – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Church Cans – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Gas Sign – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Super HG v2 (Part 2 of 3)

Lilac Sun – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Super HG v2”

When Thomas Schwab sent me his settings that would later be called Fujicolor Super HG, he asked me if there were any changes that I would make. I tried his recipe, and then created a couple of alternate versions. I concluded that I liked his recipe as-is with no changes; however, I thought that one variation I created was interesting, so I shot with it, too, and turned it into its own recipe. I call it Fujicolor Super HG v2. While it’s a collaboration between Thomas and I, he contributed the most to it.

Fujifilm introduced the Super HG line in 1986, with versions in ISOs between 100 and 1600. It saw several iterations and improvements before being replaced by the Superia line is 1998. Thomas Schwab’s Fujicolor Super HG recipe and this Fujicolor Super HG v2 recipe are more similar to Super HG 100 or Super HG 200 film. One film can have many different looks depending on how it was shot, developed, printed or scanned. The differences between the Fujicolor Super HG and Fujicolor Super HG v2 recipes might be like the differences produced by using different film scanners.

Joshua Wall – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Super HG v2”

While both Super HG recipes look great, I prefer the Fujicolor Super HG recipe for natural light photography, and I prefer the Fujicolor Super HG v2 recipe for artificial light photography. I invite you to try both, and see which version you like better. You might find that you prefer one in a certain situation and the other in a different situation. Because this recipe uses the new Auto White Priority white balance, it’s only compatible (as of this writing) with the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 cameras (and maybe the GFX100S?). If you have the X-Pro3 or X100V, you can use Auto white balance instead, and in natural light you’ll get identical results, although in artificial light it won’t look quite the same.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +1
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: 0
Clarity: +2
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Auto White Priority, -3 Red & -1 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor Super HG v2 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Crocodile – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Library Lamp – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Books on a Table – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Wood Workshop – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
33 RPM – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Tired Lake Water – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Children Playing With Sand – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Pink Blooms – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
American Renovation – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Sisters – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4

Part 1 – Fujicolor Super HG Film Simulation Recipe
Part 3 – Super HG Astia Film Simulation Recipe

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Super HG (Part 1 of 3)

Suburban Home – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Super HG”

This Fujicolor Super HG recipe was created by Thomas Schwab, who has made several film simulation recipes published on this website, including Fujicolor NPS 160 PulledSuperia Xtra 400Urban Vintage ChromeKodachrome IIKodak Portra 800 v2Classic MonochromeB&W Superia, and Monochrome Kodachrome. Thomas has also collaborated on other recipes, playing an important role in getting them right, including Kodak Portra 800Kodak Ektar 100Kodachrome 1Kodak Portra 400, and Kodak T-Max 400. Whenever Thomas sends me a new recipe idea, I’m always eager to try it out!

Thomas was photographing using the Provia 400 film simulation recipe, which requires a Fluorescent 2 (also called “Warm White Fluorescent” or “Neon 2”) White Balance. He wanted to see how that not-often-used White Balance would look with some other film simulations, and, after several adjustments, came up with this recipe. He shared it with me, and I shot with it and really liked the results! We wondered if it closely resembled any particular film—it seemed to be in the general ballpark of several Fujifilm emulsions without matching any. After digging a little deeper, and after a chance encounter with a box of prints from 1992, it was determined that Fujicolor Super HG, which is a predecessor to the Superia line, was a surprisingly close match. This recipe wasn’t intended to resemble Fujicolor Super HG film, but fortunately it does!

Smokey Sunrise – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Super HG”

I thoroughly enjoyed shooting with this recipe, as it produces some great analogue-like results! Because it requires Classic Negative, Color Chrome FX Blue, and Clarity, it is only compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 cameras. I want to give a big “Thank you!” to Thomas Schwab for creating this great recipe and allowing me to share it with you—thanks, Thomas!

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +1
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: 0
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Fluorescent 2, -3 Red & -1 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor Super HG film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Hole in the Wall – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Locked Bike – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Free College – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
College Hunks – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Arizona Neighborhood – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Hidden Home – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Window Desk – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Suburban Patriotism – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Ceiling Lights – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Carousel Top – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Super Shock Control – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Giant Metal Gorilla – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4

Part 2 – Fujicolor Super HG v2
Part 3 – Super HG Astia

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Comparing Classic Negative Recipes

Classic Negative is one of my favorite film simulations, if not my favorite. There’s something special and unique about it that separates it from the other film simulations. It produces a very Superia film-like look, but can be made to have all sorts of different aesthetics. I thought it would be fun to compare the different film simulation recipes that use Classic Negative. I did this experiment a couple of months ago (I meant to post it back then), so some of the most recent Classic Negative recipes didn’t make this list, including Fujicolor C200, Fujicolor Pro 400H, Fujicolor NPS 160 Pulled, and Positive Film. And more Classic Negative recipes are in the works right now!

My hope is that one of the pictures below will inspire you to try a recipe that you haven’t yet tried. Maybe one of them stands out to you as more interesting than the rest. If so, let me know! Also, be sure to let me know in the comments which Classic Negative recipe is your favorite!

These pictures were captured in Yosemite National Park with a Fujifilm X-E4 and Fujinon 18mm f/2 lens.

Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Positive Film

Approaching Storm at Last Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Positive Film”

I was attempting to create a film simulation recipe that mimicked the aesthetic of Saul Leiter. The problem with this task is that Saul used many different films over the years; while he had a unique and recognizable style, his exact aesthetic varied significantly. These settings can sometimes mimic his look, but sometimes not, so I wouldn’t call it a success, but I just love how this recipe looks—that’s why I’m sharing it. If you’re attempting to recreate Saul’s aesthetic, this recipe is a good starting point. Another one to try is “Old Kodak“—available (as of this writing) as a Patron early-access recipe on the Fuji X Weekly app.

I think this recipe is in the ballpark of the “Positive Film Effect” on Ricoh GR cameras—perhaps not an exact match, but definitely a similar feel, which is why I named this recipe “Positive Film.” There’s a likeness to Kodak Elite Chrome or maybe Ektachrome 100G, although (again) it’s more of a similar feel than an exact match. Whether this recipe is close to Saul Leiter’s look, Ricoh Positive Film, or a Kodak transparency is debatable; what’s not debatable is that this recipe looks really, really good!

Blacktop Lines – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Positive Film”

You might notice that I used a similar White Balance and White Balance Shift technique as my Fujicolor 100 Industrial recipe. Because it uses the Classic Negative film simulation, Color Chrome FX Blue, and Clarity, this recipe (as of this writing) is only compatible with the Fujifilm X-E4, X100V, X-Pro3, X-T4 and X-S10 cameras.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +2
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpeness: -2
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: 2950K, +7 Red & -9 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Positive Film” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Sunset Behind Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Mountain Ridge & Rainbow Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Dark Sky Behind Francis Peak – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Blue Ridge Storm – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
White House – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
House in Last Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Low Sun Behind Pines – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Light on the Treetop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Suburb Home – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Turnstile – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Wristbands – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Wet Benches – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Red Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Underground Mini – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Garage Pole – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Sliced – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Empty Chairs – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
In Window Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Tiny Wet Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
T – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X-Trans IV (X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 & X-E4) Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor NPS 160 Pulled

Sunlight Through The Forest – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor NPS 160 Pulled”

Fujifilm introduced Fujicolor NPS 160 sometime in the 1990’s. It was a low contrast, low saturation color negative film intended for portrait photography. Fujifilm replaced it in 2004 with Fujicolor Pro 160S (later renamed Fujicolor Pro 160NS). I actually shot a few rolls of NPS 160 back in the day, and a picture of my parents captured with this film hangs an a wall in their house. Pulling the film, which is a technique where you overexpose and reduce development time to compensate, further reduces the contrast and saturation. This recipe looks a lot like NPS 160 that’s been pulled.

This Fujicolor NPS 160 Pulled recipe was created by Thomas Schwab, who has made several film simulation recipes published on this website, including Superia Xtra 400Urban Vintage ChromeKodachrome II, Kodak Portra 800 v2Classic MonochromeB&W Superia, and Monochrome Kodachrome. Thomas has also collaborated on other recipes, playing an important role in getting them right, including Kodak Portra 800Kodak Ektar 100Kodachrome 1Kodak Portra 400, and Kodak T-Max 400. Some of Thomas Schwab’s pictures that he captured with this recipe can be found further down.

Empty Garage – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor NPS 160 Pulled”

What I especially love about this recipe is that it has a soft feel that’s just wonderful. It has a film-like quality to it that’s easy to appreciate. I really love shooting with this recipe! Because it required the Classic Negative film simulation, Color Chrome FX Blue and Clarity, it’s only compatible with the Fujifilm X-E4, X100V, X-Pro3, X-T4, and X-S10 cameras.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: -2
Color: -4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpeness: +1
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Auto, -1 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor NPS 160 Pulled film simulation recipe:

Thomas Schwab

Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab

Ritchie Roesch

Evening Condos – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Country Trailers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Farm Dirt – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Sunlight Through Forest Branches – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Forest Trail – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Fresh Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Ghost Bike Ahead – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Bunch of Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Peace – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Building Legos – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Jon on a Couch – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X100V (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Negative

November Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Negative”

Fuji X Weekly Patrons have had early access to this Fujicolor Negative film simulation recipe since the launch of the Fuji X Weekly app, but now it is available to all! What film does this recipe resemble? I’m not completely certain. I was messing around with the settings and stumbled upon something that I liked, which means that this recipe wasn’t intended to mimic any specific film; however, I think it’s kind of similar to Fujicolor F-II or Fujicolor Super G, but it’s not really like either. It does have a vintage Fujicolor vibe thanks to the Classic Negative film simulation that it uses as its base. Whatever film this recipe might or might not resemble, it looks beautiful!

I really enjoy using this recipe—it just produces good results that have a film-like quality. It has good contrast and natural or perhaps somewhat muted colors. This could be my go-to settings for everyday photography—that is, if I wasn’t constantly creating new recipes!

Coming Out of the Shadows – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Negative”

This Fujicolor Negative film simulation recipe is only compatible (as of this writing) with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 because it uses Classic Negative and Clarity. If you have a GFX camera like GFX-50S that has Classic Negative but doesn’t have Clarity, give this recipe a try anyway—it won’t be exactly the same but should be pretty darn close.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: +3
Color: -4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Auto, -1 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor Negative film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Winter Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Small Stop Sign – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Waste Management – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Pile of Pots – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Spilled Sakrete – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Framed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Reserved Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Oh Deer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Book of Film – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Succulent Shelf– Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Vintage Vibes

Autumn Aspen – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Vibes”

Accidents happen. Sometimes they’re happy accidents that lead to great discoveries, and sometimes they’re not. An example of one that wasn’t happy is when Omar Gonzalez accidentally used Classic Chrome instead of Classic Negative with the Agfa Vista 100 film simulation recipe. When I saw it, I thought, “You know, I’m going to make this mistake work, and call it ‘Agfa Vista Baby’—I just need to figure out what situations it works well in.” But, try as I might, Agfa Vista using Classic Chrome instead of Classic Negative just doesn’t look good. Sorry, Omar. An example of a happy accident is this recipe—it was discovered by mistake, but I’m very glad to have made that mistake.

You see, back in the fall I was shooting in Montana with what was at the time a brand-new yet-to-be-published recipe that’s now known as Kodak Portra 400 v2. Somehow I managed to accidentally change the film simulation from Classic Chrome to Classic Negative, and I shot a number of frames with this before I realized my mistake. As I reviewed the pictures I realized that the results were pretty good, and that this mistake was actually good fortune. As Lefty Gomez coined, “I’d rather be lucky than good.”

What does this film simulation recipe resemble? Of course, since it’s based on the Classic Negative film simulation, it has a Superia-like aesthetic, as that is what Classic Negative is modeled after. But to me it feels more vintage than Superia. I kept thinking that I’ve seen this look before. Not every picture makes me feel this way, but some—Autumn Aspen, Mill Creek, Blossoming Branch, etc.—seem to have this vintage vibe that I recognize from somewhere. But where?

Yellow Spots – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Vibes”
Red on Pine – Big Fork, MT – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Vibes”
Wet Red Leaves – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Vibes”

I was digging through some old issues of Arizona Highways Magazine, which, if you are unaware, is full of fantastic photography—Ansel Adams was a fairly regular contributor back in the day—and I found a very similar aesthetic on the pages of that magazine. From the mid-1960’s through the early-1980’s, there are images with this look, by numerous photographers. I did research in an attempt to discover what films were used for those pictures, but unfortunately that was largely a dead-end. I’m not sure if it’s a specific film that creates this look (and, if so, which one?), or if it’s a byproduct of the printing process that was used, or the fading ink, or a combination of all that, but this film simulation recipe, which I call “Vintage Vibes” for lack of a better name, can be, in the right situations, very similar. It’s also similar, in the right situations, to Fujicolor Superia. Whatever it looks like, it looks good, and I know that many of you will appreciate this recipe.

I’ve been wanting to get this recipe out for awhile. Sometimes it takes time. Now it’s finally ready! This “Vintage Vibes” film simulation recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 cameras.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: -2
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: 5200K, +1 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Vintage Vibes” film simulation recipe on my X100V and X-E4:

Trees & Dirt Cliff – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Forest Road – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Mill Creek – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Blossoming Branch – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Sunlit Blossoms – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Windshield Water – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Johanna & Lens Flare – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Playing in a Dirty Kitchen – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Heat Lamps – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Tableware – Woods Cross, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Snow Fun with Fujifilm X-T4 & Fujinon 90mm + New Film Simulation Recipe: Amanda’s Classic Negative

Fujifilm X-T4 & Fujinon 90mm – Photo by Amanda Roesch

My wife, Amanda, has a Fujifilm X-T4. She uses it for both stills and video. Amanda pretty much runs the video side of Fuji X Weekly, as that’s something she’s good at, but she also does some occasional portrait and product photography. A few days ago she borrowed my Fujinon 90mm lens, attached it to her X-T4, and on a snowy morning captured some pictures of our kids sledding at a local park (I was shooting with a GFX-50S, you can see some of those pictures here).

Amanda showed me the photographs that she had captured, and I liked the picture aesthetic, so I asked her what settings she used. She told me she just picked some that she thought might look nice, and went with that. She made her own recipe! It’s based on Classic Negative, which is such a great film simulation. I asked her if I could share her pictures and recipe here, and she agreed. Thanks, Amanda!

Fujifilm X-T4 & Fujinon 90mm – Photo by Amanda Roesch

This film simulation recipe is only compatible with the Fujifilm X-T4 and X-S10 (most likely the X-E4, too, when that comes out next month). If you like this recipe or these pictures, be sure to let Amanda know by leaving her a comment.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +1.5
Color: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +1
Clarity: 0
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Auto, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400

Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1

All of the pictures in this article are camera-made JPEGs captured by Amanda Roesch using this Classic Negative film simulation recipe on her Fujifilm X-T4.

Fujifilm X-T4 & Fujinon 90mm – Photo by Amanda Roesch
Fujifilm X-T4 & Fujinon 90mm – Photo by Amanda Roesch
Fujifilm X-T4 & Fujinon 90mm – Photo by Amanda Roesch
Fujifilm X-T4 & Fujinon 90mm – Photo by Amanda Roesch
Fujifilm X-T4 & Fujinon 90mm – Photo by Amanda Roesch
Fujifilm X-T4 & Fujinon 90mm – Photo by Amanda Roesch
Fujifilm X-T4 & Fujinon 90mm – Photo by Amanda Roesch
Fujifilm X-T4 & Fujinon 90mm – Photo by Amanda Roesch
Fujifilm X-T4 & Fujinon 90mm – Photo by Amanda Roesch
Fujifilm X-T4 & Fujinon 90mm – Photo by Amanda Roesch
Fujifilm X-T4 & Fujinon 90mm – Photo by Amanda Roesch
Fujifilm X-T4 & Fujinon 90mm – Photo by Amanda Roesch

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T4 Amazon B&H
Fujinon 90mm Amazon B&H

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00