My Fujifilm X-T30 Vintage Color Fade Film Simulation Recipe


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Young Boy With An Old Camera – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Vintage Color Fade”

Two days ago I posted my “Bleach Bypass” film simulation recipe, and yesterday I posted my Split-Toned B&W recipe. Today’s film simulation recipe takes elements from both of those to produce a look that reminds me of something found on Nik Analog Efex. I call it Vintage Color Fade. It’s actually similar to my Faded Color recipe, but with modifications, producing a different result. This recipe definitely has a vintage analog aesthetic to it, with some very interesting results. It’s quite amazing that you can do this in-camera!

My Vintage Color Fade film simulation recipe requires the use of the double exposure feature of your camera. You make the first exposure using the settings under “Exposure 1” below. Then, before capturing the second image, switch to the settings found under “Exposure 2″ below. The only difference between the two sets of settings is the film simulation and the B&W tone, so it’s pretty easy to switch between them. The first exposure is of the scene that you want to capture, and the second exposure is of a piece of paper, which I prefer to be out-of-focus. The paper that I used was a medium-blue 8.5″ x 11” construction paper, the same paper that I used in the Split-Toned B&W recipe. The color of the paper doesn’t matter, but whatever it is should be medium-grey in black-and-white. How bright the second exposure is will determine how faded the picture will appear.

Exposure 1
PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +4
Shadow: +4
Color: +4
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Sharpening: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
White Balance: Auto, -5 Red & +5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Exposure 2
Acros
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +4
Shadow: +4
Tone: +6 (warm)
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Sharpening: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
White Balance: Auto, -5 Red & +5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1 to -3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Vintage Color Fade film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

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Love You Always – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Indoor Potted Plant – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Fisher Price Phone – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Young Film Photographer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Josh – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Girl Reading – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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A Good Book – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Black Bike – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Down Stairs – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Honey Buckets – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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UTA Train – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

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9 comments

  1. John · February 25

    Really nice recipe! Just curius…. how your subject stays still until you take the second exposure?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ritchie Roesch · February 25

      The second exposure is of a piece of paper, so no need to stay still.

      Like

      • John · February 26

        Oh ok! You do the same for the bleach bypass recipe?
        Thanks

        Liked by 1 person

      • Ritchie Roesch · February 26

        No, bleach bypass requires two exposures of the subject, so you will need a tripod and no movement within the scene.

        Like

  2. Nikita Brody · February 26

    Hi! Thank you for great film recepies.

    Can you explain one thing to me – your recipes often contain corrections for exposure. Did I understand correctly that, for example, + 2 exposure compensation is -2 on the camera’s exposure wheel?

    Like

    • Ritchie Roesch · February 26

      +2 would be +2 on the exposure compensation wheel. But, I will add that each exposure should be looked at individually. The “typical” exposure compensation is given just as a starting point.

      Like

      • nikbrody · February 27

        Thanks for the answer. In your post below
        https://fujixweekly.com/2020/01/29/comparing-jpegs-fujifilm-x-t1-vs-x-t30/
        I noticed that when you compare photos from different camera matrices in the “plus” exposure correction, the picture becomes darker, and in the “minus” correction, it becomes brighter. This is a bit confusing.

        Like

      • Ritchie Roesch · February 29

        It’s Highlight, Shadow and Color set to +1, +2, etc. Sorry for the confusion.

        Like

  3. Pingback: 12 New Film Simulation Recipes in 2020, And Counting… | Fuji X Weekly

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