Superia Xtra 400 — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Red & Green Bush – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Superia Xtra 400”

This is a simple update to the Superia Xtra 400 Film Simulation Recipe, which was originally made for X-Trans IV cameras. I discovered that a slight tweak is needed for X-Trans V models, because the new sensor renders blues just a little deeper on some film simulations, including Classic Negative. For this recipe, simply setting Color Chrome FX Blue from Strong to Weak makes it compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S.

Thomas Schwab created the Superia Xtra 400 recipe by capturing a roll of actual Superia Xtra 400 film while also capturing identical exposures with his Fujifilm cameras, then, using X RAW Studio, he worked on the settings until he found a match. As you can imagine, he put a lot of time and effort into creating it! He shared with me some of his side-by-side pictures—comparing the film with his recipe—and it was tough to figure out which was which—they looked so close! Also, just recently another photographer shot a roll of Superia Xtra 400 film and used the Superia Xtra 400 recipe on his Fujifilm camera, and he shared with me the similar results he got between the two. Amazing! Of course, with film, so much depends on how it’s shot, developed, and scanned or printed, and the aesthetic of one emulsion can vary significantly.

Lemon Bowl – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Superia Xtra 400”

Fujifilm introduced Superia Xtra 400, a consumer-grade color negative film, in 1998, replacing Super G Plus 400. This film has been updated a couple of times, first in 2003 and again in 2006. It’s been widely used, thanks to its low cost and versatility. I’ve shot several rolls of this film over the years. This recipe is for Fujifilm X-Trans V cameras. Those with newer GFX models can use it, too, although it will likely render slightly differently.

Film Simulation: Classic Negative
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome FX Blue: Weak
White Balance: Auto, +3 Red & -5 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: -1
Color: +4
Sharpness: -1

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -2
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Superia Xtra 400” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Forwards or Backwards – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Standing Tall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Hiding Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Don’t Touch – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Neighborhood Fog – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dark Desert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Misty Desert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Clearing Clouds & Desert Mountain – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Ground Fall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Wet Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Wet Rosebud – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Early Morning Lamp – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Night Blossoms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Western Boots – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

See also:
Fujifilm X-Trans V Film Simulation Recipes
Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Timeless Negative — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Soft Rose – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Timeless Negative”

On February 3, 2021, Fujifilm shared the very first Nostalgic Neg. Film Simulation Recipe. As part of their promotion for the GFX100S, which was the first camera to have the new Nostalgic Neg. film sim, Fujifilm Japan shared a YouTube video, and hidden within was a recipe put together by the creators of Nostalgic Neg. “Nostalgic Negative is tuned for the best allrounder settings, but if you want to tweak it to get that classic American New Color look from the ’70’s, there are some adjustments you should make.” Fujifilm recommended, when using the Nostalgic Neg. film simulation, to set everything to 0, Off, or Auto, except for three things: shift Auto White Balance to +2 Red & -3 Blue, adjust Shadow to -2, and reduce Color to -2. Additional to that, I recommend using -4 High ISO NR.

I’m not a huge fan of Nostalgic Neg. set to factory defaults. It’s not bad, but it’s not what it purports to be, which is a vintage 1970’s aesthetic inspired by Eggleston, Shore, Sternfeld, and Misrach. I think Fujifilm should have had the courage to make their recipe the default, and not worry so much that it wasn’t the “best allrounder” film simulation. Fujifilm’s suggested adjustments do improve Nostalgic Neg. and bring it closer to a ’70’s vibe, but I felt I could improve it just a little more. Of course, that’s all subjective, and you might prefer factory default Nostalgic Neg., or Fujifilm’s recommended recipe, or something different altogether—in other words, when I say that this is “improved” it’s perfectly alright to disagree with that assessment, but hopefully many of you will agree that this is indeed better—at least a little, as my adjustments to Fujifilm’s recipe are pretty subtle. This particular recipe seems to be especially versatile, and can be used for many different genres of photography and in various light conditions—it looks good most anytime of the day or night.

Evening Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Timeless Negative”

This Timeless Negative Film Simulation Recipe is only compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S. I assume that the GFX100S and GFX50S II can also use this recipe, but that it will render slightly different—I don’t have either of those cameras to test it to know for certain. Unless Fujifilm gives X-Trans IV cameras the Nostalgic Neg. film simulation, which I doubt they will do, this recipe is only for X-Trans V cameras, and maybe the latest GFX, too; however, Nostalgic Neg. isn’t too dissimilar from Eterna, so perhaps consider the Arizona Analog, SantaColor, Eterna V2, and Polaroid recipes as potential alternatives for those with X-Trans IV models.

Film Simulation: Nostalgic Neg.
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Off
White Balance: Auto, +2 Red & -3 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: -2
Color: -3
Sharpness: 0

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -2
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -2/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Timeless Negative” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Dark Coffee – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Night Train – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Color Behind Frosted Glass – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Hot Hot Hot – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Sleigh Bell – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Round Trip Ticket – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dusk Train – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Keep Off – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Please… Use RitchieCam – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Barricades – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
ATSF Caboose – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Route 66 Gift Shop – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Car Above, Coke Below – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
UnAmerican Experience – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Stop Route 66 – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Los Angeles, 1978 – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Looney Tune – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Backyard Trumpet Blossoms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

Comparison

Factory default Nostalgic Neg., except High ISO NR set to -4.
Nostalgic Neg. with Fujifilm’s suggested adjustments.
This new Timeless Negative Film Simulation Recipe.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Which Film Simulation Recipes, When? — Part III (X-Trans III)

Urban Palm Leaves – Sun City West, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Everyday Astia”

Part 1Part 2Part 4

When should you use which Film Simulation Recipes on your Fujifilm X-Trans III camera? With so many recipes to choose from, it can be difficult to know what recipe you should select in a given situation, and this article is intended to help you with that. If you haven’t read Part 1, it’s important to do so because it explains what exactly we’re doing—the backstory—which is important to understand. There’s a video to watch in that article, too. Take a moment right now to hop on over to Part 1 (click here) before continuing on with this post, if you haven’t viewed it already. Also, check out Part 2 (click here) if you missed that.

Like Part 2, I set out to recommend seven recipes, one for each C1-C7 Custom Preset, that don’t share the same white balance type, because X-Trans III cameras—X-Pro2, X100F, X-E3, X-T2, X-T20 & X-H1—cannot remember a White Balance Shift within the C1-C7 Custom Presets. If two recipes share the same white balance type but not the same shift, then when you switch presets you must remember to adjust the shift, too. That can be inconvenient and frustrating, so my best solution is to program recipes that use different white balance types and/or share the same white balance type and shift. The user experience is much improved, but you might not be able to program all of your favorite recipe at the same time, which is the one downside to doing this. It was a difficult task, but I think I came up with a good set for you.

If you have a Fujifilm X-T3 or X-T30, you can use these recipes, too, by simply setting Color Chrome Effect to Off. Also, if you have a newer X-Trans IV camera (or X-Trans V), you can use these recipes by additionally setting Color Chrome FX Blue to Off, Clarity to 0, and choosing a Grain size (either Small or Large). 

C1 — Improved Velvia — Golden Hour

Lava Pond – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Improved Velvia”

For sunrise or sunset photography, this “Improved Velvia” Film Simulation Recipe is one of your best bets! It’s great anytime of the day or night when you need vibrant colors, so it has a lot of versatility, but it is especially nice during “golden hour” when the sun is low to the horizon. This recipe uses the Auto white balance type; if I wasn’t concerned about white balance type, I’d probably still choose this recipe.

Alternatives for “golden hour” photography:

Velvia
Kodak Ektachrome 100SW
Kodak Portra 400
Kodak Ektar 100

C2 — Kodak Gold 200 — Midday

Pear Blossom Day – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Kodak Gold 200”

“Midday” is simply daylight conditions outside of when the sun is low to the horizon, and for this category I’m recommending Kodak Gold 200. Even though this is a recipe for the X-T3/X-T30, it is fully compatible with X-Trans III cameras. It’s great for sunny conditions—midday or otherwise—and is good for landscapes and portraits. If you have this programmed into your camera, you’re going to use it a lot, perhaps more than any of the others. It uses the Daylight white balance type; if I wasn’t concerned about white balance type, I’d still choose this one, although each in the alternatives list are excellent options, too.

Alternatives for “midday” photography:

Kodachrome II
Dramatic Classic Chrome
Everyday Astia

Kodak Ultramax

C3 — Ektachrome E100GX — Overcast

Pink Rose Blossom – Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Ektachrome E100GX”

If it’s a rainy, overcast day, the Ektachrome E100GX is an excellent Film Simulation Recipe to try. It’s also great for many daylight situations, so it offers good versatility. This recipe uses the Fluorescent 2 white balance type; if I wasn’t concerned about white balance type I would choose Fujicolor Superia 800 instead, but this is a close second-best, and I feel good about recommending it anyway.

Alternatives for “overcast” photography:

Fujicolor Superia 800
Fujicolor Pro 160NS

PRO Neg. Hi
Kodak GT 800-5

C4 — Color Negative — Indoor

Cameras and Coffee – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Color Negative”

For natural light indoor photography, I recommend the Color Negative Film Simulation Recipe, which is another one that’s intended for the X-T3/X-T30, but is fully compatible with X-Trans III cameras. It uses the Fluorescent 1 white balance type; if I wasn’t concerned about white balance type I would choose Agfa Optima 200 instead, but this is still a solid option.

Alternatives for “indoor” photography:

Agfa Optima 200
Fujicolor Pro 400H
“Eterna”
Eterna

C5 — Fujicolor NPL 160 Tungsten — Nighttime

Dusk Lamps – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Fujicolor NPL 160 Tungsten”

For nighttime or indoor artificial light situations, try the Fujicolor NPL 160 Tungsten Film Simulation Recipe. It does especially well for “blue hour” photography at dusk or dawn, when the sun is below the horizon. This recipe uses the Fluorescent 3 white balance type; if I wasn’t concerned about white balance type, I would choose CineStill 800T instead, but this is a good second-best.

Alternatives for “nighttime” photography:

CineStill 800T
Classic Chrome
Melancholy Blue
Cine Teal

C6 — Xpro — Alternative Process

Suburban Abstract – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Xpro”

There aren’t very many options for this category, but the Xpro recipe is an excellent recipe, producing a cross-process aesthetic. It uses the Kelvin white balance type; if I wasn’t concerned about white balance type, I would probably choose the Cross Process recipe instead, but this is quite similar, so you can’t go wrong either way.

Alternatives for “alternative process” photography:

Cross Process
Vintage Kodachrome
Vintage Kodacolor
Vintage Agfacolor

C7 — Analog Monochrome — B&W

Doll – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Analog Monochrome”

Last but certainly not least is black-and-white, and for that I recommend the Analog Monochrome Film Simulation Recipe. This recipe is really good for most situations. It uses the Incandescent white balance type; if I wasn’t concerned about white balance type, I would be happy with this recipe or any in the alternatives list below, which are all good.

Alternatives for “B&W” photography:

Acros
Agfa Scala
Ilford HP5 Plus
Kodak Tri-X Push Process

Part 4

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Introducing Fuji X Weekly App Widgets for iOS!

The Fuji X Weekly App now has Widgets! This can transform how you use the Fuji X Weekly App, turning your home screen into a Film Simulation Recipe launchpad!

If you have an iOS device, you now have this new feature—if your iPhone or iPad didn’t update automatically, be sure to manually do it now. Those with Android devices don’t fret, as Widgets are in the works for Android, too.

What are Widgets? Larger than app icons, Widgets give you quick access to information or provide a different way to interact with the app. Specifically to Fuji X Weekly, you now have six Widgets to choose from: Newest Recipes (one recipe), Newest Recipes (two recipes), Recipe of the Day, Selected Recipe, Recipe Detail, and The Big X.

For Newest Recipe Widget, you have two options: small and medium. The small Widget is a shortcut to the newest recipe, and displays the lead photo of the recipe, which, when tapped, will take you right to it in the Fuji X Weekly App. The medium Widget is a shortcut to the two newest recipes, displaying the lead photo of each, and will take you to whichever of the two recipes that you tap. These Widgets are excellent for those who don’t always visit the Fuji X Weekly Blog, yet want to know when a new recipe is released.

The Recipe of the Day Widget is for when you’re not sure which recipe to use. Each day a new Film Simulation Recipe is provided, and the exact recipe will be different for each user. Between this and the Random Recipe selector, you should be able to find a recipe to use whenever you find yourself stuck for one. This Widget could be incorporated into an interesting project, such as using a different recipe each day for 30 days, or something like that. Today, on my iPhone, Kodak Portra 400 v2 is my Recipe of the Day.

Next is Selected Recipe, which is my personal favorite Widget. You can have quick access to any of the over 250 recipes right on your home screen! In order to use this, you have to tap-and-hold on the Widget, then select Edit Widget, then choose the recipe you want. Tap the Widget to open the recipe in the Fuji X Weekly App.

Recipe Detail displays the parameters of a recipe in a medium-sized Widget. To set it up, you have to tap-and-hold on the Widget, then select Edit Widget, then choose the recipe you want to display. Tap the Widget to see the recipe in the App.

Finally, there’s the Big X, which is just a four-times-size Fuji X Weekly App icon, should you find the regular-sized one to be too small.

The wonderful thing about these Widgets is that you can have as many as you’d like. If you want just one, or seven, or 20—there’s no limit! My iPhone has literally been taken over by Fuji X Weekly Widgets, and it’s transformed how I interact with the App, turning my home screen into a Film Simulation Recipe launchpad.

How do you add Widgets to your iPhone? Tap-and-hold anywhere on your home screen (except directly over an app icon), which will make all of your icons wiggle. Tap the plus in the top-left corner, which opens the Widget menu. You can either scroll down to find the Fuji X Weekly App in the app list and tap on it, or simply search for Fuji X Weekly in the search bar at the top. Find the Fuji X Weekly App Widget that you want to add to your home screen, and tap Add Widget. You can move the Widget to wherever you want on your home screen. I have several pages that are nothing but Fuji X Weekly Widgets! You can also add Fuji X Weekly Widgets to the Today View screen.

Don’t have the Fuji X Weekly App? Download it for free today (Apple here, Android here)! Consider becoming a Patron to unlock the best App experience and to help support this website.

If you have an iPhone, you should also download the RitchieCam camera app for iOS (click here).

Fujifilm X100V & Kodak Portra 400

Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Portra 400” (X-Trans III version)

Six months ago I turned my Fujifilm X100V into a monochrome-only camera, and just shot black-and-white Film Simulation Recipes with it, which was a lot of fun! I hope that someday Fujifilm makes a B&W-only model. Recently I started shooting color pictures on my X100V again, and the first three color recipes I programmed into the camera were Kodak Portra 400—three different versions of it!

My very first Kodak Portra 400 recipe is for Fujifilm X-Trans III cameras, which I published in May of 2018. It requires a hard-to-explain-and-get-right custom white balance measurement. I have had some luck in the past getting it “right” and at times not-so-much luck. I think this time I was able to get it pretty close but not exactly correct. I made three different attempts (using the three custom white balance slots), and went with the best of the three; however, I think the white balance should be slightly warmer than it is. It’s a tricky thing, and I wish it was more easily repeatable. To use this recipe on my X100V I set Grain size to Small, Color Chrome Effect to Off, Color Chrome FX Blue to Off, and Clarity to 0.

The next Kodak Portra 400 recipe is for the Fiujifilm X-T3 and X-T30, which I published in May of 2020. This one is easier to program (and probably more accurate to the film) than the X-Trans III version. To use it on my X100V I set Grain size to Small, Color Chrome FX Blue to Off, and Clarity to 0.

Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Portra 400” (X-T3/X-T30 version)

The third Kodak Portra 400 recipe is for the “newer” X-Trans IV cameras, including the X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras, which I published in June of 2020. Of the three versions, this one is probably the most “accurate” to actual Portra 400 film, but it is extremely similar to the X-T3/X-T30 recipe—only very subtly different.

One film can produce a variety of looks depending on a whole host of factors, including (among other things) how it was shot, developed, and scanned—even the pH balance and temperature of the water can affect it. It’s not possible for one recipe replicate all possible aesthetics. Also, different Fujifilm cameras have different JPEG options, and different sensor generations have slight variances in rendering; even though one recipe might be more “accurate” to the film, it’s certainly not always so—the variables are pretty significant. What’s more important than accuracy is finding the recipe that works best for you and your photography.

I’ve published many other Portra recipes, including Kodak Portra 160 (X-Trans II), Kodak Portra 160 (X-T3/X-T30), Kodak Portra 400 v2 (X-T3/X-T30), Kodak Portra 400 v2 (X-Pro3 & newer), Kodak Portra 400 Warm (X-Pro3 & newer), Reggie’s Portra (X-Pro3 & newer), Portra-Style (X-Pro3 & newer), Kodak Portra 800 (X-Pro3 & newer), Kodak Portra 800 v2 (X-pro3 & newer), and Portra v2 (X-Trans II). There are others recipes that aren’t necessarily modeled specifically after Portra film, but have a Portra-like aesthetic nonetheless, such as Bright Summer, Bright Kodak, Jon’s Classic Chrome, and Classic Kodak Chrome. There are plenty to choose from!

Let’s take a look at some photographs that I captured with the three Kodak Portra 400 Film Simulation Recipes on my Fujifilm X100V.

Kodak Portra 400 (original recipe, for X-Trans III)

Kodak Portra 400 (2nd recipe, for X-T3/X-T30)

Kodak Portra 400 (3rd recipe, for X-Pro3 & newer X-Trans IV)

Comparison

“Kodak Portra 400” (X-Trans III version)
“Kodak Portra 400” (X-T3/X-T30 version)
“Kodak Portra 400” (X-Pro3 & newer version)

I hope that seeing these three Kodak Portra 400 Film Simulation Recipes together helps you decide which to try. Maybe one stands out more to you than the others. Perhaps the camera you own is more of a determining factor than the recipe itself. I personally like all three of them, and have enjoyed shooting with them on my (no-longer-B&W-only) X100V.

Also, as a reminder, these three Kodak Portra 400 recipes are the current SOOC recipes-of-the-month. Fujifilm X-Photographer Nathalie Boucry and I will conclude our discussion of these recipes in the next broadcast (be sure to watch the last episode if you missed it!), which will be live on October 20th. Upload your images (click here) captured with one (or more) of these Kodak Portra 400 recipes by October 18th to be included in the next show. I hope to see you then!

250 Film Simulation Recipes in the FXW App — Here are 10 of my Favorites!

Abandoned Farm House – McKinney, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Natura 1600”

The Fuji X Weekly App has reached a significant milestone: 250 Film Simulation Recipes! That’s incredible! When the App launched in December 2020, it had “over 100” (123 to be exact), and now it has more than double that. Wow!

I published my first two recipe, simply called Classic Chrome and Acros, on August 27, 2017. Now, five years later, there are 250. Actually, there are more than that, because 1) none of the more complicated double-exposure recipes (here, here, here, here, here, here, and here) are in the App, and 2) it doesn’t include any of my Ricoh GR recipes or Nikon Z recipes (here, here, and here), nor any of the RitchieCam iPhone camera app filters.

I thought a fun way to celebrate the 250-recipes-in-the-App milestone would be to pick my favorite one from each block of 25. For some groups, I knew right away which recipe would represent it. For other groups, there were six or seven recipes that I strongly considered before making a decision—of course, that’s the trouble: there are way more than 10 Film Simulation Recipes that are my favorites! Half of these use Classic Chrome, three use Classic Negative, one uses Eterna, and one uses Acros.

1 – 25

26-50

51-75

76-100

101-125

126-150

151-175

176-200

201-225

226-250

Now it’s your turn. Which of these 10 recipes do you like best? Which recipes not in this list are your favorites? Let me know!

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3 B&W Nikon Z Film Simulation Recipes + 1 Bonus Color Recipe

When the Nikon Zfc was announced in 2021, I preordered it, and waited a long time for it to come. When it finally arrived, I pulled the Zfc out of the box and began to use it, and I was quickly disappointed. I said that it was most similar to the Fujifilm X-T200, yet significantly bigger, heavier, and more expensive. Still, I put the camera through its paces, and even created 11 Nikon Z Film Simulation Recipes using the Zfc. Then the camera went back into its box, and I strongly considered selling it.

After months and months of none-use, and after moving to a different state, I decided to give the Zfc one more try, but with a significant modification: I ditched the lousy Nikkor 28mm lens in favor of the TTArtisan 35mm f/1.4. Why? Because the TTArtisan lens has an aperture ring, and the Nikkor doesn’t. The TTArtisan lens is better optically than the Nikkor, too—I’m much happier with this setup. I then made three more Nikon Z recipes!

Right now I’m working on my full-review of the TTArtisan 35mm f/1.4 lens (coming very soon!), and that means using it. In the process, I made four more recipes—I guess I couldn’t help myself! Three of these are black-and-white and one is color. If you add these four to the 14 others, I now have 18 Film Simulation Recipes for Nikon Z cameras!

Obviously, I made these JPEG recipes on the Zfc, so it will render differently on the full-frame models, but I’m not sure exactly how differently, as I’ve never used a full-frame Z camera. The reports have been positive, though, so I assume that they work well, including on the more expensive bodies—I just have no first-hand experience myself.

For those who might not know what “Film Simulation Recipes” are, they’re JPEG camera settings that allow you to achieve various looks (mostly analog-inspired) straight-out-of-camera, no editing needed. It can save you a lot of time by simplifying your workflow, and it can make the process of creating photographs more enjoyable.

These will be the last Nikon Z recipes that I create, as I decided not to keep the Zfc. If you are interested in buying it (bundled with the 28mm pancake and TTArtisan 25mm lenses), let me know. It’s gently used, and has spent more time in its box than out of it. Just send me a message if you are interested. Why am I selling the Zfc? Partly because I have never been fully satisfied with it, and partly because I’ve yet to figure out where it makes sense in my photographic process—it seems out of place in my bag. If sometime in the future Nikon makes a better effort on a similar camera, I’ll certainly consider buying it; however, the Zfc was just not the one for me.

Dramatic Monochromatic

Nikon Zfc — Dramatic Monochromatic

Similarities to using a red filter with B&W film.

Picture Control: Monochrome
Quick Sharp: 0.00
Sharpening: +3.00
Mid-Range Sharpening: +2.00
Clarity: +1.00
Contrast: +1.00

Brightness: +1.00
Filter Effects: Red

Toning: B&W
Active D-Lighting: High
High ISO NR: Low
White Balance: Cloudy
WB Adjust: B6.0 G6.0
ISO: up to 6400

Nikon Zfc — Dramatic Monochromatic
Nikon Zfc — Dramatic Monochromatic
Nikon Zfc — Dramatic Monochromatic
Nikon Zfc — Dramatic Monochromatic

B&W Push-Processed

Nikon Zfc — B&W Push-Process

Resembles the contrast of B&W film that has been push-processed.

Picture Control: Graphite
Effect Level: 100
Quick Sharp: 0.00
Sharpening: +2.00
Mid-Range Sharpening: +2.00
Clarity: -2.00
Contrast: +2.00
Filter Effects: Yellow

Toning: B&W
Active D-Lighting: Extra High
High ISO NR: Low
White Balance: Direct Sunlight
WB Adjust: A0.0 G0.0
ISO: up to 6400

Nikon Zfc — B&W Push-Process
Nikon Zfc — B&W Push-Process
Nikon Zfc — B&W Push-Process
Nikon Zfc — B&W Push-Process

B&W Film

Nikon Zfc — B&W Film

Reminiscent of black-and-white negative film.

Picture Control: Carbon
Effect Level: 100
Quick Sharp: 0.00
Sharpening: +1.00
Mid-Range Sharpening: +1.00
Clarity: -2.00
Contrast: +1.00
Filter Effects: Orange

Toning: B&W
Active D-Lighting: Extra High
High ISO NR: Low
White Balance: Natural Light Auto
WB Adjust: A0.0 G0.0
ISO: up to 6400

Nikon Zfc — B&W Film
Nikon Zfc — B&W Film
Nikon Zfc — B&W Film
Nikon Zfc — B&W Film

Vintage Agfacolor Fade

Nikon Zfc — Vintage Agfacolor Fade

Reminds me of Agfacolor slides from the 1930’s

Picture Control: Graphite
Effect Level: 50
Quick Sharp: 0.00
Sharpening: 0.00
Mid-Range Sharpening: +1.00
Clarity: -2.00
Contrast: +1.00
Filter Effects: Red

Toning: Blue Green 0.00
Active D-Lighting: High
High ISO NR: Low
White Balance: Incandescent
WB Adjust: A6.0 M1.0
ISO: up to 3200

Nikon Zfc — Vintage Agfacolor Fade
Nikon Zfc — Vintage Agfacolor Fade
Nikon Zfc — Vintage Agfacolor Fade
Nikon Zfc — Vintage Agfacolor Fade

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Nikon Zfc — Amazon — B&H
TTArtisans 35mm f/1.4 — Amazon — B&H

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My Favorite Fujifilm Film Simulations (The 1,000th Post!!!)

I captured this yesterday with my Fujifilm X-E4 using an upcoming recipe.

This is the 1,000th post!

I started the Fuji X Weekly blog on August 21, 2017, with the intention of writing one article per week. Initial this was a long-term review (or journal, as I called it) of the Fujifilm X100F, but (obviously) it morphed into something much different than that. Life has a way of taking you down roads you wouldn’t have considered or even thought possible. Here we are, four years and ten months later, and this website doesn’t much resemble its origins.

Firstly, Fuji X Weekly is no longer about one camera, but about all Fujifilm cameras. Secondly, its focus is no longer mere journalling; instead, the primary purpose of this page is JPEG camera settings, called Film Simulation Recipes, that allow you to achieve straight-out-of-camera results that look good—you don’t have to edit if you don’t want to. And, of course, there’s the Fuji X Weekly App, so you can take these recipes with you on the go—almost 250 of them!

Also captured yesterday with my X-E4 using an upcoming recipe.

I wanted to do something special for this important 1,000th article. I knew that it needed to be related to film simulations and recipes somehow, but I wasn’t sure how exactly. Like the time I didn’t know why the ball kept getting bigger, then it hit me (sorry for the bad joke…)—I figured it out: for this article, I would rate my favorite film simulations—from most liked to least liked—and also share my favorite Film Simulation Recipes for each. The new Nostalgic Negative film simulation isn’t in this list because I’ve never used it, so I have no idea how I would rank it, but I do believe it’s one that I would particularly appreciate.

Without further ado, here are my favorite Fujifilm film simulations, plus my favorite Film Simulation Recipes for each!

#1 Acros

Motel – Panguitch, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Tri-X 400”

Love at first sight!

When I tried the Acros film simulation on my Fujifilm X100F for the first time, I was blown away by it, as it produced the most film-like results I’d ever seen straight-out-of-camera. It was a big reason why I decided to stop shooting RAW and rely on camera-made JPEGs instead. I’m a sucker for black-and-white (probably because I shot a lot of it in my early film days), and the Acros film simulation produces incredibly lovely monochrome pictures. Acros is found on all X-Trans III, IV & V cameras, as well as GFX.

Favorite recipes:

Kodak Tri-X 400
Agfa Scala
Acros Push-Process

#2 Classic Negative

Classic Mirror – Fort Worth, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Natura 1600”

Modeled carefully after Superia film, Classic Negative is the closest film simulation to replicating the aesthetic of actual color negative film (albeit, Fujicolor film, not Kodak). It is programmed uniquely and beautifully—there’s so much to love about it! For color photography, I could shoot exclusively with Classic Negative and be happy. Unfortunately, this film simulation is only found on the X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras, as well as X-Trans V and GFX.

Favorite recipes:

Fujicolor Natura 1600
Fujicolor Superia 800
Xpro ’62

#3 Classic Chrome

Two Caballeros – Culleoka, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Kodachrome 64”

Prior to the introduction of Classic Negative, Classic Chrome was my favorite color film simulation, with its distinctive Kodak color palette. While it’s third on this list for me, I bet that it’s number one for many of you, since the most popular Film Simulation Recipes are those that use it. Fujifilm introduced it in 2014 with the X30, and retroactively gave it to some of their prior X-Trans II cameras (although not all) via firmware updates. Most Fujifilm models have Classic Chrome, and all since 2014 do.

Favorite recipes:

Kodachrome 64
Kodak Portra 400 v2
Vintage Kodachrome

#4 Eterna

Sentinel & Merced – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Vintage Color”

The Eterna film simulation has a uniquely soft tonality; while it can be somewhat mimicked with PRO Neg. Std, there’s nothing that can completely faithfully replicate it. Because its beauty is in its subtleness, it can be easily overlooked. Some might think it’s only for video (which it is good for, too), but it is great for still photography. It was introduced on the X-H1, but that’s the only X-Trans III camera with it; otherwise, Eterna can be found on X-Trans IV, V, and GFX.

Favorite recipes:

Vintage Color
Kodak Vision3 250D
Negative Print

#5 Monochrome

Haystack Driftwood – Cannon Beach, OR – Fujifilm X100V – “Ilford HP5 Plus 400”

While the Acros film simulation grabs the headlines, the Monochrome film simulation is itself a solid black-and-white option; however, because I liked Acros so much I basically ignored it for years, which is unfortunate. Monochrome has a different tonality than Acros and doesn’t have the built-in Grain, but it is still an excellent film simulation—one of the best, in fact. All Fujifilm cameras have the Monochrome film simulation.

Favorite recipes:

Ilford HP5 Plus 400
Ilford Pan F 50 Plus
Dramatic Monochrome

#6 Eterna Bleach Bypass

Low Sun over Tetons – Grand Teton NP, WY – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Ferrania Solaris FG 400“

This is Fujifilm’s latest film simulation (aside from Nostalgic Negative, which is currently only found on one GFX camera, but soon on X-Trans V), and it’s basically the Eterna film simulation but with lots more contrast and even more muted colors. Eterna Bleach Bypass can deliver stunning results that are definitely different than what’s possible with the other options. This film simulation is only found on the X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, X-T30 II, X-Trans V, and the newest GFX models.

Favorite recipes:

Ferrania Solaris FG 400
Lomochrome Metropolis
Ektachrome 320T

#7 PRO Neg. Std

Lakeside House & Road – Culleoka, TX – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor Superia 800”

PRO Neg. Std used to be my third favorite film simulation, behind Acros and Classic Chrome. It has a subtle beauty with muted tones and contrast—similar to Eterna (although not quite as pronounced) but with more of a color negative feel than cinematic. Even though Fujifilm has introduced new film simulations that I like better, I still very much appreciate this one. Most Fujifilm models (with the exception of a few really old ones) have PRO Neg. Std.

Favorite recipes:

Fujicolor Superia 800
Fujicolor 100 Industrial
CineStill 800T

#8 Velvia

Hoodoos – Bryce Canyon NP, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Vibrant Velvia”

Velvia 50 was my favorite color transparency film for landscape photography. While the Velvia film simulation isn’t a close approximation of that film straight out of the box, it can be made to look pretty similar with some adjustments. For vibrant landscapes, this is the film simulation to choose. Velvia can be found on all Fujifilm cameras.

Favorite recipes:

Vibrant Velvia
The Rockwell
Velvia v2

#9 PRO Neg. Hi

Wet Glass Bokeh – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Jeff Davenport Night”

At this point we’ve moved into the film simulations that use far less frequently. PRO Neg. Hi is basically PRO Neg. Std but with more contrast and saturation. It’s not bad at all, and it used to be my go-to film simulation for portraits (which I think it’s particularly good for). Most Fujifilm models (with the exception of a few really old ones) have PRO Neg. Hi.

Favorite recipes:

Jeff Davenport Night
Fujicolor Pro 400H
PRO Neg. Hi

#10 Provia

Abandoned Ice Chest – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Standard Provia”

Fujifilm calls the Provia film simulation their “standard” profile, but I’ve never really liked it. Because of that, I usually only shoot with it when I force myself to do so, and sometimes some interesting things come from that. All Fujifilm cameras have the Provia film simulation.

Favorite recipes:

Standard Provia
Provia 400
Cross Process

#11 Astia

Wind from the West – Hammond, OR – Fujifilm X-E4 – “CineStill 50D”

The Astia film simulation is pretty close to PRO Neg. Hi in terms of contrast and saturation (although Astia is a bit more vibrant), but with a different tint that I think you either like or don’t like. I used to shoot with it a lot more more than I do now. It’s a good alternative for landscapes when Velvia is just too strong. Every Fujifilm camera has the Astia film simulation.

Favorite recipes:

CineStill 50D
Super HG Astia
Redscale

#12 Sepia

No Credit Tires – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Sepia”

Last and least is Sepia, the often forgotten film simulation. For some reason every camera has it and almost nobody uses it.

Favorite recipes:

Sepia

It’s your turn! Which film simulation is your favorite? Which Film Simulation Recipe do you use most? What on this list was most surprising to you? Let me know in the comments!

Fujifilm X100V + X-Pro3 Film Simulation Recipe: Pushed CineStill

City Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Pushed CineStill 800T”

This “Pushed CineStill 800T” Film Simulation Recipe came about after I stumbled across an amazing picture that was captured on CineStill 800T film during daytime with an overcast sky. It turned out that the film was push-processed, but I never learned by how many stops (I’m guessing one-stop). After some extensive Googling, I was able to find several more examples of push-processed CineStill 800T film shot in overcast daytime light. I then set out to mimic that aesthetic on my Fujifilm camera, and I figured it out; however, my first recipe was only compatible with the X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras, so I made this alternative version that works on the X-Pro3 and X100V (you can use it on those “newer” cameras, too, if you’d like).

Interestingly enough, even though this recipe is intended for daytime photography, it does quite well at night, too; however, I do believe it more faithfully mimics the film in cloudy daytime conditions. It does produce nice results in daylight or night, so feel free to use it anytime. Film can look different depending on how it is shot, developed, or scanned (among many other things). This recipe doesn’t replicate pushed CineStill 800T film under all circumstances, but in certain conditions it’s a good facsimile. I really like how this one looks, and I think some of you will really appreciate it, too!

Cigarettes – Reno, NV – Fujifilm X100V – “Pushed CineStill 800T”

This was a Fuji X Weekly App Patron Early-Access Recipe, so App Patrons have had access to it since October, but now it’s available to everyone! A new Early-Access Recipe replaced it—find it in the Fuji X Weekly App!

Eterna
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +3
Shadow: +1
Color: -2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: 0
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: 7700K, -9 Red & +7 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Pushed CineStill 800T” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V & Fujifilm X-E4:

Gas Pumps at Night – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Nighttime Neighborhood – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Night Walkway – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Nighttime Flowerpot – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Potted Shrub – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Burger Boy – Reno, NV – Fujifilm X100V
Playground Girl – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Rose Garden – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Hoop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this Film Simulation Recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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New: Fuji X Weekly App Update!!

I just published an update to the Fuji X Weekly App! If your device didn’t update the App automatically, be sure to manually do so right now.

What’s in this update?

First is Search. You now have the ability to search for Film Simulation Recipes! This new feature allows you to search for recipes by name to more quickly locate the exact one that you are looking for. If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, the search feature works in conjunction with Filter, so (for example) if you Filter By Camera, only those recipes compatible with your camera will appear when you Search. In other words, all App users get Search, but this feature is even better for Patrons. The ability to search for recipes is a significant improvement⁠—it definitely makes the App more user friendly. On Apple, simply scroll up (drag the recipe list down) and Search will appear towards the top. On Android, tap the magnify glass icon at the top-right and Search will appear.

Next is Random Recipe selector. Not sure which Film Simulation Recipe to use? Let the Fuji X Weekly App decide for you! Tap the crossing arrows icon at the top-right, and the App will randomly select one for you to use. The Random Recipe selector also works in conjunction with Filter, so even though it’s available to everyone, it’s even better if you are an App Patron. This fun new feature is addicting! If you’re in a photographic rut, this might help you get out of it. If there are a couple of you out photographing together, you can make a game out of it. I personally have really enjoyed using the Random Recipe selector, and I think you will, too!

Last but not least, the recipe parameter order has been improved. Unfortunately, the order of settings is different depending on your camera model, and even on the same model the order can be different within the IQ menu vs Custom Settings menu, so it’s not possible for it to be perfect; however, I do believe that the new order will make it a bit easier to program recipes into your camera.

This Fuji X Weekly App update is intended to make recipes easier to find and program, plus add a little fun to the experience. I hope that you find it useful and enjoyable!

Don’t have the Fuji X Weekly App? Download it today!

Not a Fuji X Weekly App Patron? Consider subscribing to unlock the best App experience! Within the App, tap the Gear icon, then select Become A Patron.

New Fujifilm X-Trans IV FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Expired Velvia

Red Blossom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Expired Velvia”

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes. These Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many Early-Access Recipes have already been publicly published on this Blog and the App, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new “Expired Velvia” Fuji X Weekly App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe came about after a Fuji X Weekly reader shared with me some photographs that he had captured on long-expired Velvia 50 color reversal film. He didn’t have the lab adjust the development time for the expired film, so they were all underexposed; however, they turned out really interesting, with an aesthetic that leaned more towards Superia than Velvia. I think this recipe does a great job of mimicking that look. If you are searching for a Film Simulation Recipe that’s a little different, this is one to try! It’s definitely not for everyone, but some of you will love it. It’s compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, it’s available to you right now on the App!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Expired Velvia” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Light Post – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Hotel Door – Flagstaff, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Restaurant – Flagstaff, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Webs We Weave – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Outdoor Chair Cushion – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Jo Playing with Roly Polies – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
A Boy & His Fishing Pole – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Covered Boat Dock – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Lake Houses – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
‘Bout to Blossom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Wet Rose – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Triangles – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Fenced Sun – Amarillo, TX – Fujifilm X-E4
A Whale of a Sunset – Branson, MO – Fujifilm X-E4

Fujifilm X-Trans I (X-E1 + X-Pro1) Film Simulation Recipe: Ektachrome

Diesel – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Ektachrome”

Ektachrome is a line of color transparency film introduced by Kodak in the 1940’s. I did some research, and counted 40 different emulsions over the years that carried the Ektachrome name! Generally speaking, Ektachrome was less warm than Kodachrome (although it depends on which Ektachrome you’re referring to), and also less archival. While Kodachrome was discontinued in 2009, Ektachrome can still be purchased today. I’m not certain which (of the 40) Ektachrome films this recipe most closely resembles. It has more of a general Ektachrome feel rather than being an exact copy of a specific emulsion.

This was a Patron Early-Access recipe, but has been replaced by another, so it is now available to everyone! If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, be sure to look for the recipe that replaced this one. This “Ektachrome” recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-E1 and X-Pro1 cameras. Unfortunately, even though the X-M1 is X-Trans I, this recipe is not compatible with that camera. I really like how this one looks, and I think some of you will really appreciate it, too!

Two Cans – Weber Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1

Pro Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Shadow: +2 (Hard)
Color: -1 (Medium-Low)
Sharpness: +2 (Hard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Daylight/Fine, -1 Red & +3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Ektachrome” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-Pro1:

House Flag – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Dead Wood – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Cattails – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Succulent Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Ektachrome”
Boy On Couch Watching TV – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Drinking Fountain – Weber Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Two Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Berries in a Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Blackberry Bush – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Francis Peak Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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New Fujifilm X-Trans IV Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Fujichrome Provia 100F

Berry Behind the Baseball Diamond – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujichrome Provia 100F”

The Fuji X Weekly app is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new film simulation recipes. These Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, all of the original Early-Access Recipes have been publicly published on this blog and the App, so everyone can now use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App, so I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new recipe is called “Fujichrome Provia 100F” after the film that it is intended to mimic. Fujifilm introduced Provia 100 in 1994, and replaced it with the much improved Provia 100F in 2001. I’ve only shot a couple of rolls of Provia 100F. I remember that it had a cool color cast (especially when compared to Kodak films), it had a fair amount of contrast, moderate saturation, and tended to render blues strongly. This recipe has been in the works for awhile, with a lot of failed attempts. I think it does pretty well at reproducing the aesthetic of the film, but there are definitely a few compromises—more of the “memory color” that Fujifilm talks about, than perhaps a 100% accurate rendition. Still, I believe that it turned out pretty well overall.

Actual Fujicolor Provia 100F 35mm film. Chicago, 2005.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the App!

Example photographs captured using this “Fujichrome Provia 100F” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Wasatch Front – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Blue Sky Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Branch Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Baseball Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Windsock – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Field 3 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Skateboard & Runner – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Creek Under Branches – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Trail Through the Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fence Along Path – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Josh at the Court – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Top 25 Film Simulation Recipes of 2021

Cooking Up A Film Simulation Recipe – Fujifilm X-E4 – Fujicolor Super HG v2

By popular demand, I’ve compiled a list of the Top 25 Film Simulation Recipes of 2021! The methodology of determining which ones were most popular is simple: page views. The articles that were viewed the most throughout the entirety of 2021 were declared “most popular” for this list. It’s possible that, while the article was viewed a lot, the recipe wasn’t used all that much—I’m uncertain of a way to know which ones were the most used, so most viewed is the best method I’ve come up with. Also, it’s important to note that the recipes published in 2021 were at a disadvantage because they didn’t have a full year to be viewed, and this is especially true for those published towards the end of the year.

Last year I published Top 20 Most Popular Film Simulation Recipes of 2020, and, while there are some similarities, there are some interesting changes between the two years. The top most popular recipe of 2020 fell to Number 10 for 2021, while #2 in 2020 climbed to #1. Number 7 in 2020 didn’t make the 2021 Top 25 list at all. There’s plenty of other changes, too, yet also some recipes that stayed the same: Number 3 remained in the same place, as did Number 8.

Below you’ll find the Top 25 Film Simulation Recipes of 2021! I’d love to know which of these recipes are your favorites. If there’s a recipe in this list that surprises you, or if there’s a recipe that you’re surprised didn’t make the list, let me know in the comments!

25

24

23

22

21

20

19

18

17

16

15

14

13

12

11

10

9

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

Find these film simulation recipe and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Best Film Simulation Recipes for Cityscapes (Video)

In this “SoundBite” (as we’re calling it) from Episode 05 of SOOC, Fujifilm X-Photographer Nathalie Boucry and I discuss three film simulation recipes that are good for urban photography. This is a short snippet from the show, and it gives you an idea of the type of content that’s found in a SOOC broadcast. If you missed Episode 05 and/or Episode 06, I’ve included them below.

If you’ve never watched, SOOC is a monthly live video series that’s interactive. It’s a collaboration between Nathalie and I. We discuss film simulation recipes, camera settings, and answer your questions. Basically, we’re trying to help you master your Fujifilm camera, with a focus on simplifying your photographic workflow.

The three recipes discussed in this video are:
Kodachrome 64
Jeff Davenport Night
Fujicolor 100 Industrial

Also, if you don’t have the Fuji X Weekly App, be sure to download it for free today.

See also:
Noise & Grain Explained
Fujifilm In-Camera RAW Reprocessing

SOOC Season 01 Episode 05:

SOOC Season 01 Episode 06:

Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak High Definition Plus 200

Evergreen Tops – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Kodak High Definition Plus 200”

This Kodak High Definition Plus 200 film simulation recipe was a fun one to make. My wife, Amanda, was looking through an old box of pictures when she came across a group of prints that she thought looked interesting, so she showed them to me. The images were captured in the Sierra Nevada mountains, largely in the Sequoia National Forest, in 2006. I had no idea what film I used, but after locating the negatives, I discovered it was Kodak High Definition Plus 200. The pictures were printed on Fujicolor Crystal Archive paper. Not surprisingly, Fujifilm paper produces a different aesthetic than Kodak paper, so if this film had been printed on Kodak paper the pictures would look a little different. Back then, the rule of thumb for best results was that Kodak negatives should be printed on Kodak paper, Fujifilm negatives should be printed on Fujifilm paper, etc., but obviously I broke that “rule” with these travel pictures.

Kodak High Definition Plus 200 was a color negative film that was also sold under the name Kodak Royal Supra 200. At the time, Kodak claimed that it was the sharpest and finest-grained ISO 200 color negative film on the market. Originally there were ISO 100, 200, 400 and 800 varieties, but since this film line was introduced right at the beginning of the decline of film, it didn’t take Kodak long to discontinue all but the ISO 200 and 400 versions, and even those didn’t last all that long. I shot a few rolls of the film, and after digging through that photo box, I found two sets of negatives, both exposed around that same timeframe. I honestly don’t remember all that much from the experience, but it was fun to rediscover these long-forgotten pictures and recreate the aesthetic on my Fujifilm X-E4 camera.

A picture of Kodak High Definition Plus negatives, captured with this recipe.
A picture of Kodak High Definition Plus 200 prints, captured with this recipe.
A poor quality scan of one of the prints. Sorry. I really need to buy a better scanner.

For ISO 200 color negative film, Kodak High Definition Plus 200 was indeed pretty sharp and fine-grained. It was moderately vibrant (just a little above “true to life”) and contrasty but not overly contrasty. From what I can tell, it didn’t have as large of an exposure latitude as some of Kodak’s other color negative films. It was warm, but seemed to lean more towards green than red when printed on Fujicolor paper. Obviously, how the film is shot, developed, printed and/or scanned will affect how it looks (I apologize for my poor quality scan above, which doesn’t do the picture justice whatsoever, but I wanted to share it anyway). This recipe mimics how I shot the film in 2006, printed on Fujicolor paper. It is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +1
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: 0
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: 4800K, -2 Red & -7 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Kodak High Definition Plus 200 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4 & Fujifilm X100V:

Walking Bridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Hollow Building – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Leaves that Left – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Flag & Evergreen – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Green Pine Needles – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Red Roof – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Lonely Table – Orem, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Night Shopping Carts – Draper, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Pillow on Couch – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fake Succulent – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Evening Clouds Over Wasatch Mountains – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Disappearing Light on Francis Peak – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipe and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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New Fujifilm X-Trans III App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Vintage Kodacolor

Large Stone & Tall Grass – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Vintage Kodacolor”

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new film simulation recipes. These early-access recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many early-access recipes have already been publicly published on this blog and the App, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new Patron early-access recipe is called Vintage Kodacolor. I was inspired by some old Kodacolor puzzles that I stumbled across (did you know that Kodak made jigsaw puzzles?). I’m not completely certain which Kodacolor film was used for these puzzles—possibly Kodacolor II—or how much the printing process affected the aesthetic, or even how much the colors have faded and shifted over time. Whatever the case, this recipe does a pretty good job emulating it, and produces a warm vintage-like aesthetic that’s easy to appreciate. There’s some similarities between this and my Kodacolor II 126 recipe. This “Vintage Kodacolor” recipe is fully compatible with all X-Trans III cameras, plus the Fujifilm X-T3 and X-T30. Those with newer X-Trans IV cameras can use it, too, but you’ll have to decide on Grain size.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the App!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Vintage Kodacolor” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-H1:

Vintage Phragmites – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Evening Reeds and Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Three Brown Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Don’t Approach the Great Blue Heron – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Safe Zone – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Sunset Through The Grass – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Evening Light on the Wood – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Flowers No More – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Metal Door – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Cardboard Architect – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Holiday Horse Rider – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-H1

FXW App: Filter by White Balance — How To Use This New Feature

The Fuji X Weekly App was updated just yesterday, and I want to discuss one of the new features that I think will be heavily used: Filter by White Balance! This feature is unlocked by becoming a Fuji X Weekly App Patron.

Filter by White Balance will be a game-changer for many of you. The most obvious use is for finding recipes that match the lighting conditions. Is it sunny? Find a recipe that uses the Daylight White Balance. Is it indoors in mixed lighting? Maybe Auto White Balance would be good. But there’s another way to use Filter by White Balance, which I’ll discuss below, that will make your Fujifilm experience even better!

If your Fujifilm camera is older than the X-Pro3, you cannot save White Balance Shift within the C1-C7 Custom Presets, and each time you change Presets, you have to remember to adjust the WB Shift. It can be a little annoying. However, for each White Balance type, the camera will remember one WB Shift, so if each of your C1-C7 presets uses a different White Balance type, when you switch Presets, you won’t have to adjust the WB Shift. Amazing!

Let’s take a more practical look at this. If you have a Fujifilm X-T3 (for example), we’ll Filter by Camera and select the camera. For the X-T3, you’ll have over 70 recipes to choose from!

Let’s select one recipe to be our C1 in the Custom Settings menu. We’re now going to Filter by White Balance, and tap Auto—there are nearly 40 recipes to choose from! If you find more than one that requires the same WB Shift—Classic Chrome and Velvia both use +1R & -1B, and Velvia v2 and Dramatic Monochrome both use 0R & 0B, just as a couple examples—you can actually use multiple recipes from this White Balance type, and potentially program more than just C1. For this example we’re going to pick just one, perhaps Eterna v3 (interestingly, Agfa Optima 200 shares this same shift, and could be used, too), to be our C1 preset.

For C2 we’re going to select Daylight. There are 12 options to choose from. Kodak Portra 160, Kodak Portra 400, and Kodak Gold 200 all share the same WB Shift, so, in theory, you could program all three of these into your Custom Settings presets. For this, let’s go with Kodak Tri-X 400 to be our C2.

Next, for C3, let’s select Kelvin. You have 15 to choose from. Let’s choose maybe Jeff Davenport Night.

For C4 we’ll go with the Fluorescent 1 White Balance. There are just two options, and we’ll select Kodak Vision3 250D.

It’s the same story for Fluorescent 2: there are only two options. We’ll choose Ektachrome E100G to be our C5 preset.

For C6 we’ll select Incandescent. There’s just one recipe: Eterna Bleach Bypass, so we’ll program that one in.

Lastly, we have C7, and for that we’ll select Shade. There are three options, and we’ll go with Porto 200.

Now we have our C1-C7 Custom Settings presets programmed! C1 is Eterna v3. C2 is Kodak Tri-X 400. C3 is Jeff Davenport Night. C4 is Kodak Vision3 250D. C5 is Ektachrome E100G. C6 is Eterna Bleach Bypass. And C7 is Porto 200. That’s a pretty good set! Since each preset uses a different White Balance type, you won’t have to adjust the WB Shift when you switch presets. For those White Balance types that don’t have very many options, such as Fluorescent 1, Fluorescent 2, etc., if you didn’t like any of the choices, you could alternatively use two recipes that share both the same White Balance and WB Shift (such as the ones mentioned earlier).

You can come up with multiple combinations of these C1-C7 options, and keep track of them using the new colored Stars. Maybe use Green Stars for these seven recipes, and come up with another seven that can be used together and mark them with Blue Stars, and another seven that are marked with Purple Stars. Just an idea.

I hope this all makes sense. Filter by White Balance can be useful in more than one way. If your camera is older than the X-Pro3, this will make your Fujifilm experience more enjoyable, as you won’t have to remember to check the WB Shift each time you change presets. If you don’t have the Fuji X Weekly App, download it now. If you do have the App and it didn’t automatically update, be sure to visit the appropriate App Store and manually update it. If you are not a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, for the best App experience, consider becoming a Patron today!

Available Now: The Fuji X Weekly App Update!

The big Fuji X Weekly App update is available right now!

If your phone or tablet didn’t automatically update the App, be sure to manually update it right away. Depending on your device and how you have it configured, it’s possible that you might have to delete the App and reinstall, but most people shouldn’t have to do that in order to update it. Hopefully for most of you it happened automatically already, and you’re good to go. The App update is in both the Google Play Store for Android and the Apple App Store for iOS.

What’s in this “big” update? Plenty! Some of the things are for everyone, and some of the things are only for Fuji X Weekly App Patrons. Let’s talk about the improvements that are for everyone first, and then we will get to the good stuff that’s for Patrons.

View Sample Pictures Larger

Normal size pictures.
Tap to view pictures larger.

This is a pretty straightforward improvement: tap on a picture to view larger, and tap again to return to normal size. One request that I’ve received many times is the ability to enlarge the sample pictures in each recipe. Now you can! Of course, you can view them even larger (and see more of them) on the website—there’s a link at the bottom of each recipe.

Sort by A-Z, Z-A, Newest-to-Oldest, & Oldest-to-Newest

Before this update, you could only sort the recipes either alphabetically A-Z or chronologically Newest-to-Oldest. Now I’ve added Z-A or Oldest-to-Newest as options. If you know the name of the recipe and it begins on or after the letter N, sorting Z-A might make it quicker to locate. Or if you know that a recipe you are looking for was published awhile ago, sorting Oldest-to-Newest might make more sense. This should make it a little easier and quicker to locate what you are searching for.

Now, to the good stuff!

All of the improvements mentioned below are available for Fuji X Weekly App Patrons. The best App experienced is reserved for Patrons, so if you are not one, consider subscribing today! Simply tap the Gear icon in the App, and then select Become a Patron.

Filter by White Balance or Dynamic Range

There are two new Filter options: White Balance and Dynamic Range. Some users will benefit from Filter by Dynamic Range, but Filter by White Balance is huge! If your Fujifilm camera is older than the X-Pro3, you cannot save White Balance Shift within C1-C7 Custom Presets, and each time you change Presets, you have to remember to adjust the WB Shift. It can be a little annoying. However, for each White Balance type, the camera will remember one WB Shift, so if each of your C1-C7 presets uses a different White Balance type, when you switch Presets, you won’t have to adjust the WB Shift. For many, this is a game-changer!

Favorite with Colored Stars

One really great upgrade is Favoriting with colored Stars. Before, when you tapped the Star to Favorite a recipe, it came in one color (yellow). But now you can choose between five different colors: yellow, red, green, blue, and purple. The benefit of this is that you can use colored Stars to organize recipes. Maybe yellow represents the recipes currently loaded into your camera, red represents the recipes you want to try next, and green represents the ones you tried in the past and really liked. Or maybe yellow is your favorite portrait recipes, green your favorite landscape recipes, and blue your favorite street recipes. Use the colored Stars to categorize the recipes however is meaningful to you. This is a great organizational tool, and, for some, this makes the App a significantly better experience.

Blank Recipe Cards

If you’ve ever created your own film simulation recipe, or if you’ve found some elsewhere that you like (perhaps on the Fuji X Weekly Community Recipes page, such as AstiAmore in the example above), you can now add them to your App! A new feature is blank recipe cards that you fill out. You can even add your own pictures from your camera roll! At some point down the road the idea is that you’ll be able to export, import, and share these custom recipes; however, that ability isn’t in this update—with any luck it will come before summer. Several of you have asked for blank recipe cards, and now you have them! This is a great new feature that many of you will really appreciate.

There’s one other thing that I want to mention: if you tap the Gear icon in the top-left of the App and look way down at the bottom, you will see Shop The Latest Fujifilm Gear. These are affiliate links to B&H and Amazon. If you are shopping for some new gear and you happen to think about it, I’ll be compensated a small amount if you make a purchase using my links. It’s a simple way to support Fuji X Weekly that doesn’t cost you anything.

Below are even more images of the new and improved Fuji X Weekly App!

I want to give a special thanks to Sahand Nayebaziz for all his hard work on this App update! Without him, not only would the App not be nearly as good as it is, but there wouldn’t be a Fuji X Weekly App at all. Thank you so much, Sahand!

Sneak Peek: Fuji X Weekly App Update

The Fuji X Weekly App is a free mobile film simulation recipe library containing over 175 recipes for Fujifilm cameras! It’s available on both Apple and Android. This is an essential tool to accompany Fujifilm X cameras, so if you don’t have the App, you should go download it now.

Coming very soon is a large update to the Fuji X Weekly App, and I want to give you a sneak peek of what’s in store for you!

Before I begin, however, I want to talk briefly about the benefits of a becoming an App Patron. The Fuji X Weekly App is free, but advanced features are unlocked for Patrons, including Filtering, Favoriting, and early-access to some new recipes. The best App experience is reserved for Patrons.

There are two reasons why I bring this up. First, many of the App update improvements apply to Patron features, and those using the App for free won’t have access to these. The update is big for Patrons, and small for those who are not. Second, I’ve had several people tell me that I need to do a better job selling the Patron subscription because they were unaware of how much better the App is when you become a Patron. “I didn’t know what I was missing,” a couple people recently told me. If you want to get the most out of the Fuji X Weekly App, including the things we’re going to talk about below, you should become a Patron today!

That’s the entirety of my sales pitch (I’m a terrible salesman). Now to the App update sneak peek!

Favoriting & Filtering

One really great upgrade that’s coming is Favoriting on steroids. Before, when you tapped the Star to Favorite a recipe, it came in one color (yellow). But very soon you will be able to choose between five different colors: yellow, red, green, blue, and purple.

The benefit of this is that you can use colored Stars to organize recipes. Maybe yellow represents the recipes currently loaded into your camera, red represents the recipes you want to try next, and green represents the ones you tried in the past and really liked. Or maybe yellow is your favorite portrait recipes, green your favorite landscape recipes, and blue your favorite street recipes. Use the colored Stars to categorize the recipes however is meaningful to you. This will be a great organizational tool, and, for some, this is going to make the App a significantly better experience.

Another awesome App improvement that’s coming is Filter by White Balance. For many, this will be a game-changer. This is going to be the feature for some that makes the Patron subscription worthwhile! Why? Because if your Fujifilm camera is older than the X-Pro3, you cannot save White Balance Shift within C1-C7 Custom Presets, and each time you change Presets, you have to remember to adjust the WB Shift. It can be a little annoying. However, for each White Balance type, the camera will remember one WB Shift, so if each of your C1-C7 presets uses a different White Balance type, when you switch Presets, you won’t have to adjust the WB Shift.

In the App, select Filter by Camera and choose your model—let’s say you have an X-H1. Then Filter by White Balance. Start with Auto, and choose one of those recipes to be your C1 Custom Preset. There are a couple of these recipes that share the same WB Shift, so you could, if you wanted, use more than one, just as long as the WB Shift is the same. Then choose Daylight, and pick one of those recipes to be C2. Again, there are a couple that share the same WB Shift, so you could pick more than one, just as long as the WB Shift is the same. Next is Shade, and there’s just one recipe (right now, anyway) to choose from, so that could be C3. Then select Kelvin, and pick one of those recipes to be C4. Fluorescent 1 is next, and there’s only one recipe to choose from, so that could be C5. Same for Fluorescent 2, and that could be C6. Ditto for Incandescent, and that could be C7. If you picked two Auto and two Daylight recipes (that shared the same WB Shift), then you could skip two of the White Balance options that only have one recipe.

Using Filter by White Balance to help you select recipes for your C1-C7 Custom Presets will make your shooting experience more enjoyable because you won’t have to remember to adjust the WB Shift each time you change to a different Custom Preset.

Custom Recipe (Blank Recipe Cards)

If you’ve ever created your own film simulation recipe, or if you’ve found some elsewhere that you like (perhaps on the Fuji X Weekly Community Recipes page), you will soon be able to add them to your App! A new feature will be blank recipe cards that you fill out. You will even be able to add your own pictures from your camera roll! At some point down the road the idea is that you’ll be able to export, import, and share these custom recipes (that ability won’t be in this update). Several of you have asked for blank recipe cards, and soon you’ll have them! This will be a fun new feature that some of you will really appreciate.

There are, of course, a number of other smaller improvements that are coming with the App update—this is just a sneak peek at three of the bigger ones. With any luck, the update should be out before the end of the month. Oh, and we’ve already begun working on the following update (for sometime next year) that will include a number of other great new features and improvements.