My Fujifilm X-T30 Jeff Davenport Night Recipe

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Reflected Red – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Jeff Davenport Night”

I was asked to create a film simulation recipe that mimics the aesthetics of photographer Jeff Davenport. Interestingly enough, Jeff uses Fujifilm cameras (X100F and X-H1). He shoots RAW and has his own post-processing workflow that allows him to create the specific looks that he wants. He has a few different styles, depending on what (and what time) he’s shooting. Jeff has several different photographic series, and each has its own look. My attempt here was to create something in-camera that produces results similar to his night pictures.

This recipe, which I call Jeff Davenport Night, isn’t an exact match to Jeff’s look, but it’s pretty close. His blue tends to lean slightly more towards green, but if I replicate that it throws everything else off. Orange in his pictures tend to turn red, which is something I can’t replicate. I think a lot of how a picture looks (both in Jeff’s case and with these settings) depends on the light in the scene. Results can vary greatly. Jeff might possibly use flash with colored gels, as well (something you could try if you wanted). Anyway, despite not being exact, this recipe is pretty close to recreating his look in-camera on my Fujifilm X-T30.

If you want a recipe that is good for night photography, this is one you should consider, along with my CineStill 800T recipe, because of the Kelvin temperature of the white balance, which goes well with artificial light. You don’t have to use it exclusively after dark, as results can be interesting sometimes when used in daylight. It’s fun to experiment with! For night photography, this will be one of your best options.

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Pleiku – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Jeff Davenport Night”

When I attached my camera to a tripod, I used ISO 1600 or lower. When I did hand-held photography, I used up to ISO 6400. I think if you can take your time and use a tripod, it’s good to use a lower ISO, but you can still get good results with higher ISOs. Because of the use of the Color Chrome Effect, this recipe is intended for X-Trans IV cameras, but feel free to try it on your X-Trans III camera; it will look very similar, but not exactly the same.

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +0
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: +1
Grain Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
White Balance: 2650K, -1 Red & +4 Blue

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Jeff Davenport Night” recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

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Button – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Unlucky 13 Take Out – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Blue Street – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Blue Buildings – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Blue Lights – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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So Much Bicycling – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Red – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Closed Red Umbrellas – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Parked Car at Night – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Night Hotel – Farmington, UT -Fujifilm X-T30

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Caution Poles – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Dumpster 204 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Lights Beyond The Rooftop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Nighttime Neighborhood – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Francis Peak at Night – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Reach for the Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Illuminated Houses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Wind Sock – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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No Thanks – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Earn Points – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Refining – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Night Walking – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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McKay – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Flag & Window – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Illuminated Blue – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Multi-Color Triangle – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Center Street Lamp – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Don’t – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Wet Glass Bokeh – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

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My Fujifilm X-T30 Vintage Color Fade Film Simulation Recipe


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Young Boy With An Old Camera – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Vintage Color Fade”

Two days ago I posted my “Bleach Bypass” film simulation recipe, and yesterday I posted my Split-Toned B&W recipe. Today’s film simulation recipe takes elements from both of those to produce a look that reminds me of something found on Nik Analog Efex. I call it Vintage Color Fade. It’s actually similar to my Faded Color recipe, but with modifications, producing a different result. This recipe definitely has a vintage analog aesthetic to it, with some very interesting results. It’s quite amazing that you can do this in-camera!

My Vintage Color Fade film simulation recipe requires the use of the double exposure feature of your camera. You make the first exposure using the settings under “Exposure 1” below. Then, before capturing the second image, switch to the settings found under “Exposure 2″ below. The only difference between the two sets of settings is the film simulation and the B&W tone, so it’s pretty easy to switch between them. The first exposure is of the scene that you want to capture, and the second exposure is of a piece of paper, which I prefer to be out-of-focus. The paper that I used was a medium-blue 8.5″ x 11” construction paper, the same paper that I used in the Split-Toned B&W recipe. The color of the paper doesn’t matter, but whatever it is should be medium-grey in black-and-white. How bright the second exposure is will determine how faded the picture will appear.

Exposure 1
PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +4
Shadow: +4
Color: +4
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Sharpening: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
White Balance: Auto, -5 Red & +5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Exposure 2
Acros
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +4
Shadow: +4
Tone: +6 (warm)
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Sharpening: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
White Balance: Auto, -5 Red & +5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1 to -3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Vintage Color Fade film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

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Love You Always – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Indoor Potted Plant – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Fisher Price Phone – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Young Film Photographer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Josh – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Girl Reading – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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A Good Book – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Black Bike – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Down Stairs – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Honey Buckets – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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UTA Train – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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My Fujifilm X-T30 Color Negative Film Simulation Recipe


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Evening Light On A Clearing Mountain – Riverdale, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Color Negative”

Silly Putty was invented by accident. There was a shortage of rubber during the second world war, and as a result several companies worked hard to create a synthetic substitute. What we now know as Silly Putty was a failed attempt at synthetic rubber. Even though it didn’t turn out exactly like its inventor had hoped, it still became a useful product that has brought joy to many people across the world. This “Color Negative” film simulation recipe has a similar story to Silly Putty (minus the war and rubber).

I’ve been working on a number of different recipes, trying to mimic several different aesthetics that I’ve been asked to create. One of the films that I’ve been trying to recreate the look of is Fujifilm C200, but I’ve yet to crack the code. This recipe is one of the failed attempts at C200. I like how it looks, so I thought I’d share it, even though it’s not exactly what I was trying for. I hope it become useful and brings joy to someone.

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Cameras and Coffee – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Color Negative”

I named this recipe “Color Negative” only because it has a general color negative aesthetic, and I didn’t know what else to call it. It’s in the general neighborhood of Fujifilm C200, but it’s not exactly right for that film. Perhaps there’s some generic film that looks similar to this. It doesn’t precisely mimic any one film that I’m aware of, but this recipe does have a film-like quality to it.

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +2
Color: -2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +1
Grain Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect: Off
White Balance: Daylight Fluorescent (1), -2 Red & +4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Note: There was some confusion on the white balance required for this recipe. It’s Fluorescent 1, also called Daylight Fluorescent or Neon 1. It’s the first option underneath Cloudy.

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using my Color Negative Film Simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-T30:

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Fallen Leaves – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Hanging Apple – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Leaf Hanging On – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Boy Unsure – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Joy’s Smile – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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White Stars – Roy, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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White Cloud Ridge – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Reserved Parking – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also: My Fujifilm Film Simulation Recipes

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Comparing Film Simulation Recipes


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I shoot JPEGs, but it’s not uncommon for me to shoot RAW+JPEG, since it gives me the opportunity to reprocess the picture in-camera, which is helpful when developing different film simulation recipes. Because of this, I was able to process a single picture I captured recently on my Fujifilm X-T30 using many of my different recipes to compare the differences. I thought that this might be helpful to some of you. Perhaps there’s one recipe that stands out to you in the pictures below that you’ve never used. Obviously different settings look better in different situations, and in this article there’s just one picture to compare, so even though you might not like how one recipe looks in this article doesn’t mean that you wouldn’t like it with different subject and in a different light. The scope of this article is quite limited, but I hope that seeing the various film simulation recipes applied to a single exposure is helpful to someone.

Not every recipe was used for this post. Some of them require a specific parameter that was not available. For example, the picture at the top was made using my HP5 Plus Push-Process recipe, which requires an ultra-high ISO, so it wasn’t possible to apply it to the exposure below. Other recipes, such as my faded color and faded monochrome, require double exposures. There are other film simulation recipes that you could try not represented below, and I invite you to investigate the different options to see if there’s one or more that work well for your photography. Let me know in the comments which film simulation recipe is your favorite and which in your opinion fits the exposure below best.

Color

B&W