Fujifilm X-Trans II Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Platinum 200

Bicycle 88 – West Valley City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Platinum 200”

Fuji X Weekly reader Corey Steib (Instagram here and here) shared with me an X-Trans II recipe that he created called Kodak Platinum 200. Corey named it this because it reminds him of vibrant Kodak film captured with a Panaflex Platinum motion picture camera, and because the best results are found at or near ISO 200. This recipe is nothing like the Eterna film simulation, but it does have a slight cinematic feel to it nonetheless thanks to the Shadow setting. It looks really nice, with vibrant colors and soft shadows, and is a great all-purpose recipe. Thank you, Corey, for creating this and allowing me to share it!

I have the ISO in my camera set to Auto, with the upper limit set to ISO 3200. I’m happy with the results from my X-T1 all the way to ISO 3200, but the intention of this recipe is to keep the ISO lower when you can. In bright light, depending on the contrast in the scene, because of the DR-Auto setting, the camera might select ISO 200 or ISO 400, and the idea is to use this recipe at those ISOs when practical. As the available light decreases, it’s perfectly fine to increase the ISO, and I feel good going as high as ISO 3200 when necessary.

Touch of Red – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Kodak Platinum 200”

This film simulation recipe is compatible with all Fujifilm X-Trans II cameras. You can use it on X-Trans I and Bayer sensor cameras, too, but the results will be a little different (feel free to try, though).

Provia
Dynamic Range: DR-Auto
Highlight: +1 (Medium-High)
Shadow: -2 (Low)
Color: +2 (High)
Sharpness: +1 (Medium-High)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Daylight/Fine, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 3200
(but… the lower the better)
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured with my Fujifilm X-T1 using this “Kodak Platinum 200” film simulation recipe:

Snack – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Yellow Rope – West Valley City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Unicorn Jo – West Valley City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Curved Trunk – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Log Bridge & 3 Trees – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Bridge & Stump – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Pine Needles – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Tree Canopy – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Plastic Plants – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-Trans I (X-Pro1, X-E1 & X-M1) Film Simulation Recipe: Provia

Cradle Tree Branch – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Provia”

This film simulation recipe reminds me of a filter that I used frequently on a photo editing app on my old Nokia Lumia 1020 phone (sorry, I don’t remember the app name, it’s been many years). It produces a nice vintage feel, with perhaps a cross-processed aesthetic. I especially like how it renders green and blue. Because it uses the Provia film simulation, I’ve named this recipe simply “Provia” even though it doesn’t look all that much like real Provia film. Cameras that are older than the Fujifilm X-Pro3 can’t save White Balance Shifts with each Custom Preset, so it’s helpful to have recipes that use different White Balance options. That’s how this recipe began, and why it uses the Incandescent White Balance option.

This “Provia” film simulation recipe has been a Patron early-access recipe on the Fuji X Weekly app since January, but now it’s available to everyone! There’s a new Patron early-access recipe for X-Trans I cameras on the app that replaced this one. This recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro1, X-E1 or X-M1 camera. If you have a Bayer or X-Trans II camera, this recipe will still work, although it won’t look the same; however, I invite you to try it anyway.

Green Tree & Blue Sky – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Provia”

Provia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -2 (Low)
Shadow: -1 (Medium-Low)
Color: +1 (Medium-High)
Sharpness: 0 (Normal)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Incandescent, +6 Red & -9 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Provia” film simulation recipe:

Sun over Country Horses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Target – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Bricks in the Wall – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Strollin’ Jo – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Green Canopy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Bunch of Little Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
White Bloom in a Green Bush – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Park Path – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Looking up Through The Trees – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-M1 (X-Trans I) Film Simulation Recipe: Classic Analog

Sticks & Dry Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Classic Analog”

I wanted to create a Portra recipe for X-Trans I cameras, such as the Fujifilm X-M1. All of my Portra recipes are based on the Classic Chrome film simulation, but X-Trans I cameras don’t have Classic Chrome. I did create a recipe for mimicking Kodachrome without Classic Chrome, but that’s intended for X-Trans II cameras, and, while the results are similar, it doesn’t look exactly the same on X-Trans I. This recipe was my attempt at Portra without Classic Chrome, but it’s not quite Portra enough for me to name it Portra. It’s close but no cigar, but it does look nice nonetheless, and I like how it renders pictures on my X-M1.

This was a Patron early-access recipe on the Fuji X Weekly app. Fuji X Weekly Patrons have had the opportunity to use it since December 1st, but now it’s available to everyone! There’s a new Patron early-access recipe for X-Trans I on the app in its place. If you have the app, go check it out!

E.T. – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Classic Analog”

This recipe also marks the first one that includes a photograph captured by my 11-year-old son, Jonathan. I let him use my X-M1, and I liked one of the pictures he made, which you’ll find further down this article, entitled Frozen Pond Scum. The Fujifilm X-M1 can be found for cheap, and would make a great “first real camera” for a kid. Maybe I’ll give him mine at some point in the future.

Provia/STD
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: -1
Color: -2
Sharpness: 0
Noise Reduction: -2
White Balance: Daylight/Fine, +1 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs made using this Classic Analog film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-M1:

Thin Ice – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Falling Water – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Autumn Overcast – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Night at the Lake – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Frozen Drain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Frozen Pond Scum – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Irrigation Cover – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Quadruple U’s – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Improbable – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Evening Euonymus – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Blue Sky Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Yellow, Lamp – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
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Comparing Film Simulation Recipes


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I shoot JPEGs, but it’s not uncommon for me to shoot RAW+JPEG, since it gives me the opportunity to reprocess the picture in-camera, which is helpful when developing different film simulation recipes. Because of this, I was able to process a single picture I captured recently on my Fujifilm X-T30 using many of my different recipes to compare the differences. I thought that this might be helpful to some of you. Perhaps there’s one recipe that stands out to you in the pictures below that you’ve never used. Obviously different settings look better in different situations, and in this article there’s just one picture to compare, so even though you might not like how one recipe looks in this article doesn’t mean that you wouldn’t like it with different subject and in a different light. The scope of this article is quite limited, but I hope that seeing the various film simulation recipes applied to a single exposure is helpful to someone.

Not every recipe was used for this post. Some of them require a specific parameter that was not available. For example, the picture at the top was made using my HP5 Plus Push-Process recipe, which requires an ultra-high ISO, so it wasn’t possible to apply it to the exposure below. Other recipes, such as my faded color and faded monochrome, require double exposures. There are other film simulation recipes that you could try not represented below, and I invite you to investigate the different options to see if there’s one or more that work well for your photography. Let me know in the comments which film simulation recipe is your favorite and which in your opinion fits the exposure below best.

Color

B&W