Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Ektar 100

50207858802_f2aefe6bb0_c

Dock Light – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Ektar 100”

I already have a Kodak Ektar film simulation recipe that I published a little over two years ago, but I’ve been wanting to revisit it for awhile. In the article that I published for that recipe, I wrote, “I’m actually a little hesitant to call this film simulation recipe Kodak Ektar 100 because it’s not quite right. It’s close, but a little off. The color palette is slightly askew.” That’s a true statement. My original Ektar recipe is close but no cigar. Since that time Fujifilm has added more JPEG options to their cameras, so would it be possible to get closer to real Ektar on my X100V?

Kodak introduced Ektar in 1989. It has been made in ISO 25, 100, 125, 400 and 1000 versions at one time or another. Kodak discontinued Ektar in 1997, but they brought it back in 2008 with an updated emulsion. I’ve shot the old Ektar but never the new Ektar. It’s my understanding that they’re similar but not exactly the same.

This new film simulation recipe will be controversial. To achieve a more correct color palette, this recipe is based off of Classic Chrome instead of Astia. The reason that I used Astia in the original recipe is because “Classic Chrome isn’t vibrant enough, even with Color set to +4.” That’s still true, although Color Chrome Effect does help a little. Honestly, if +6 was an option, that’s what I’d set Color to. Unfortunately that’s not an option, so we have a slightly undersaturated recipe. Another issue is that Ektar can have several different looks, depending on how it’s shot, developed, and printed or scanned, just like any film; however, with Ektar, even a 1/3 stop over or under exposure can noticeably effect the aesthetics of the picture.

50200349207_758d6550a6_c

Peach Sun – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Ektar 100”

Fuji X Weekly reader Thomas Schwab helped me immensely with this recipe. He’s had a hand in several recipes, and even created one from scratch that’s quite popular: Urban Vintage Chrome. Thomas captured a bunch of pictures with actual Ektar film, and made several similar exposures with his X-Trans IV cameras. He showed me examples of both, applying my original Ektar recipe to the pictures captured with his Fujifilm cameras. Then we began to create a new Kodak Ektar 100 film simulation recipe based on his Ektar pictures, hoping to achieve something closer to the film than the original recipe.

We discovered very quickly that Ektar is impossible to faithfully recreate on Fujifilm cameras, because only Classic Chrome has the correct color palette, and it’s not vibrant enough. We tried Astia, Provia, Velvia, and PRO Neg. Hi, and of those Astia was the closest, but none of them were right. We settled on Classic Chrome despite it not being vibrant enough. We went back-and-forth on different settings, but especially the white balance. There were several times that we said, “This is it,” only to modify something the next day.

A problem we encountered is that Ektar can have several different looks, even from the same roll of film. There was a discussion about creating as many as three different recipes, depending on the exact aesthetic we wanted to recreate, but decided to go with just one recipe, modeled after our favorite pictures from Thomas’ Ektar film. After even more back-and-forth we finished with this recipe here. We feel confident that it is as close as we could get to actual Ektar film, acknowledging that it’s very close but not exactly right.

50207585381_690dfb5bdc_c

Boat in the Bay – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Ektar 100”

The original Ektar recipe isn’t an exact match to the film, and I believe that this new recipe is closer. The two recipes each produce a different look, and perhaps they both have a place, depending on what exact aesthetic you are after. This new recipe was a collaborative effort, and I want to give a special “thank you” to Thomas Schwab for all of the time and effort he put into making this a reality. It’s much appreciated!

This Kodak Ektar 100 film simulation recipe is intended for and only compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4. It uses Clarity, which slows down the camera considerably. I just allow the pause to slow myself down. Another option, which is what Fujifilm recommends, is to add Clarity later by reprocessing the RAW file in-camera or with X RAW Studio.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR-Auto
Highlight: +1
Shadow: -2
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: 0
Clarity: +3
Grain Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: 6050K, +3 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this new Kodak Ektar 100 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

50207056048_86d1cec035_c

Daisies by the Dock – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X100V

50199491133_a475819855_c

Henry’s Fork – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

50200032226_6241a7f21f_c

Johnny Sack Cabin – Island Park, ID – Fujifilm X100V

50207058698_99041b012e_c

North Shore of Island – Wild Horse Island State Park, MT – Fujifilm X100V

50199529508_52f79afbee_c

Butters – Roy, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50200035566_cd516a68ca_c

Mustang Evening – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50200344117_f53e848c66_c

Roofline Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50200063851_979837c7cc_c

Finding Clues – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50200354632_50fd1015d9_c-1

Golden Boy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50199551933_9ecd80cb81_c

Rocket Launching – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50200341742_072ae06d5d_c

Yellow Lady – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50200067236_71966bbedb_c

Light Too Bright – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50200096446_8f1f6bebff_c

Lawnmower Handle & Shadow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50200070531_d508a347b6_c

Air Pump – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50200356072_d4953bdcf0_c

Blossom Red – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50199544328_fd653a9cd9_c

Flower Garden Blossom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50199551953_a4ecaabf9d_c

Bug Hiding on a Flower – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50199537008_5815333243_c

Rose Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50200365587_aa5c94c9eb_c

Marsh Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Ultramax 400

50174810886_0124629e81_c

Empty Outdoor Seating – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Ultramax 400”

Ultramax 400 is Kodak’s consumer grade ISO 400 color negative film. Kodak has sold Ultramax 400 under many different names, beginning in 1987 with Kodacolor VR-G 400, rebranded Gold 400 one year later, called simply GC at one point, and finally, in 1997, Kodak settled on Ultramax 400. Kodak still sells Ultramax 400, although it’s not the same film as Kodacolor VR-G 400. This film has been tweaked and updated at least nine times over the years; however, the overall aesthetic is still substantially similar between all variations.

This recipe is a happy accident. I was actually working on a different Kodak film simulation recipe, and this was a failed attempt. But I liked how this one looked, so I made a minor adjustment, and created this recipe, which I determined looked a heck-of-a-lot like Ultramax 400. I didn’t intentionally create an Ultramax 400 recipe, but nonetheless here it is! Sometimes it’s better to be lucky than good.

50200245208_d78ebfb3c4_c

Colorful Store Decor – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Ultramax 400”

For some of you this new recipe will be an instant favorite. I really love how it looks and plan to use it frequently. This one might be right up there with Kodachrome 64 and Portra 400 for favorite Kodak presets. A word of caution: it does require Clarity, which slows down the camera considerably. This film simulation recipe (as of this writing) is only compatible with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4 cameras.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR-Auto
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +1
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: 0
Clarity: +3
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Auto, +1 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this new Kodak Ultramax 400 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

50178962181_da32606fab_c

Road Construction – Clearfield, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50178327343_0ac683488a_c

Store Closing – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50175068762_488e04a441_c

Urban Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50186500091_d71ac4d89d_c

Summer Fruit Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50186500256_e7d9cafc5d_c

Ripening Peaches – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50201065162_652937ce49_c

Wood Barrel – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50174810781_941e788494_c-1

Table & Chair – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50174272903_8148e89df8_c

Library Lights – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50174272833_412c04112c_c

Contemplation – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50186753377_66e82229c5_c

Blackberry Boy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50186500246_317a74d048_c

End Table Succulent – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50186555573_f3855e1f02_c-1

Math Books on a Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50202588233_e9759a3c0e_c

Kitchen Tools – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50200787276_d1efd98ae7_c

Quality Goods – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50200788091_501ee832c8_c

75 – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50200245203_b57a1d0732_c

Table Bloom – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50200787921_cd3d64a367_c

Fake Tulips – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50178423693_30aafce99f_c

Fake Flowers in Window Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation: Kodak Portra 400

49964317753_8dcdc9cc18_c

Bridge Over Stream – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Portra 400”

This is a brand-new version of my X-T30 Kodak Portra 400 film simulation recipe, designed specifically for the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4. My “old” recipe isn’t, in fact, old, as I published it only one month ago, but already I have improved on it, thanks to Fujifilm’s new tools, and also thanks to Fuji X Weekly reader Thomas Schwab, who helped tremendously refine the recipe to be more accurate to actual Portra 400 film. You see, he captured some pictures with Portra 400 film and made some identical pictures with his X-Pro3. After a few small changes, this new recipe emerged. It’s very similar to the X-T30 Portra 400 recipe, the differences aren’t huge, but it is subtly better in my opinion.

Portra 400 was introduced by Kodak in 1998, and was redesigned in 2006 and again in 2010. As the name implies, it’s intended for portrait photography, but can be used for many other types of photography. It’s similar to Portra 160, but with more contrast, saturation and grain. Believe it or not, ISO 400 was considered “high ISO” by many photographers back in the film days, and Portra 400 was one of the absolute best “high ISO” color films ever made. Like all films, results can vary greatly depending on how it’s shot, developed and printed or scanned, and even which version of the film you’re talking about.

49964830636_8e81ec2748_c

Backlit Forest Leaves – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Portra 400”

This new Portra 400 film simulation recipe requires the use of Clarity, which slows down the camera considerably. Fujifilm suggests shooting RAW and adding Clarity later, but I just use the pause to slow myself down. The use of Clarity also means that this recipe can’t be used on “older” cameras, only the X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4 (as of this writing), but feel free to apply the white balance shift of this recipe to the X-T30 version and see if you like it better.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR-Auto
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -2
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: +2
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Daylight, +3 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this new Kodak Portra 400 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

49964836441_2a4ed04636_c

Light Green Leaves – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

49964905801_df0f159f25_c

Sunlight In The Tree – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

49964845406_8b853f2941_c

Forest – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

49964836726_b18c6a34e6_c

Creek Through The Trees – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

49964845291_4056451dbe_c

Light on the Water – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

49964836471_b19476b0ee_c

Creek – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

49964820146_e8e887f267_c

Big Green Leaf – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

49962111552_5371f744ab_c

Sunshine & Tree Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

49962111532_7224eb6554_c

Sunlit – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

49964399628_1b4ea8cfef_c

Stone & Blooms – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

49965187477_3444e78a92_c

Jo Swinging – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

49977763936_042f02c24a_c

Brother & Sister Driving – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

49957191748_b42318d213_c

Protect & Serve – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

49977751431_996d67699a_c

Seagull on a Lamp – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

49957191848_cb47b5ea4e_c

Stormy Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Film Simulation Review: Kodak Portra 400 – New vs. Original

49834886928_58e28caeba_c

New Kodak Portra 400

49835725502_74e6c90e3c_c

Original Kodak Portra 400

I have two different Kodak Portra 400 film simulation recipes. I created the original Portra 400 recipe two years ago on my old Fujifilm X100F. I created the new Portra 400 recipe just recently on my Fujifilm X-T30. Which one is better? Which should you use? How do they compare?

The original recipe requires a hard-to-achieve custom white balance measurement, and for that reason I never really liked it. Yes, it looks good, but to get the recipe right requires a vague setting. Some people, in lieu of the custom white balance measurement, use auto-white-balance, which is a fair way to deal with the issue. On my X-T30 I don’t think I have the custom white balance quite right, but it was as close as I could get at the time that I took the measurement. The original Portra 400 recipe is one of the most frustrating recipes I’ve created, but it also produces great results sometimes.

The new Portra 400 recipe is a little more accurate to the film, in my opinion. Of course, with film, depending on how it’s shot, developed, printed or scanned, results can vary greatly. While I think the new version is more accurate, that’s not to say that the original version isn’t accurate. It’s just a little different look. In this post are examples of pictures captured with both recipes side-by-side.

Which one is the better Kodak Portra 400 recipe? The new version is easier to program, overall a little more accurate to the film, and in many situations I like it better; however, sometimes I prefer the original Portra 400 recipe. I can’t tell you which one is better for you, but I can tell you for me, I like the new recipe better, yet I see that the original version has its place and shouldn’t be discarded. That’s just my tastes, and yours might be different. Hopefully seeing the two recipes next to each other provides you with some clarity on which to choose.

49835408621_4c5bc4874b_c

New Kodak Portra 400

49835729787_dbbef1bb70_c

Original Kodak Portra 400

49835714892_599f706a6f_c

New Kodak Portra 400

49835729722_db842947d5_c

Original Kodak Portra 400

49835408636_e8f5f24765_c

New Kodak Portra 400

49835423656_dba3466f5a_c

Original Kodak Portra 400

49834917543_0252597677_c

New Kodak Portra 400

49835427701_849d0701f7_c

Original Kodak Portra 400

49835452751_003d5cdaef_c

New Kodak Portra 400

49834913058_1062c109a9_c

Original Kodak Portra 400

See also: Film Simulation Reviews

My Fujifilm X-T30 Kodak Portra 400 Film Simulation Recipe

49836241267_a13aee27e1_c

Around The Bend – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Kodak Portra 400”

Portra 400, which is a color negative film, was introduced by Kodak in 1998. It was redesign in 2006 and again in 2010. As the name implies, it’s intended for portrait photography, but can be used for many other types of photography. It’s similar to Portra 160, but with more contrast, saturation and grain. Believe it or not, ISO 400 was considered “high ISO” by many photographers back in the film days, and Portra 400 was one of the absolute best “high ISO” color films ever made. Like all films, results can vary greatly depending on how it’s shot, developed and printed or scanned, and even which version of the film you’re talking about. Interestingly, Kodak briefly made a black-and-white version of Portra 400!

I’ve been meaning to revisit Kodak Portra 400 for some time now. As you may know, I already have a Kodak Portra 400 recipe, which I created two years ago, but it requires a difficult-to-achieve custom white balance measurement. I was never really satisfied with that recipe, even though it can produce interesting results. I have been eager to create a new Portra 400 recipe, and, In fact, I’ve tried a couple of times, but without success.

49839225103_03baccba57_c

Blue Sky Day – Syracuse, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Kodak Portra 400”

A Fuji X Weekly reader suggested to me that if I use my Kodak Portra 160 recipe, except increase Shadow, Highlight and Color by one, that should be pretty close to Portra 400. Indeed it is! I liked what I saw, but I played around with the settings more to see if I could improve on it. Turns out not much needed to be tweaked. I liked the results better with Color Chrome Effect set to Strong, but if you have an X-Trans III camera, which doesn’t have that feature, you can still use this recipe, but it will look slightly different. The only other change that I made was I set Grain to Strong.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR-Auto
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -1
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Grain Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
White Balance: Daylight, +4 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Kodak Portra 400 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

49845738078_566374f3e2_c

Mountain in the Evening Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49837851111_ccb502874d_c

Reeds To The Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49839733486_9d9a57c25a_c

Jensen Pond – Syracuse, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49835936441_ccc227b5d1_c

Water Beyond The Trees – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49835936671_349cc65f80_c

Paved Trail – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49836240517_1a20cff8af_c

Spring Green & White – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49839193168_9c462e5c93_c

Fries in the Sky – Syracuse, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49834802131_285ccf7cac_c

Royal Lunch – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49839194168_b9bb07190f_c

Evening Suburban Home – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49839735121_11b30dbc87_c

Boy in the Striped Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49839192068_47b176bf08_c

Boy Sitting – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49835450181_e1d3540955_c

Sunlight Through The Pink Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49835450321_5090722863_c

Pink Tree Bloom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Film Simulation Review: Walk in the Park, Part 1: Kodak Ektar 100

49832643172_7561eef254_c

April Forest – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm

Last week I went for a walk in a local park here in Utah. This park has trails that pass through forests. There’s a stream and a small lake. The snow-capped peaks are visible to the east. It’s a beautiful place, especially in the spring when the green is fresh and the flowers are blossomed. On this hike I brought along my Fujifilm X-T30 with a Fujinon 35mm f/2 lens attached to it, which is one of my absolute favorite lenses. It’s sharp, small, and plenty fast, plus it’s a versatile focal length. On the way up the trail I used my Kodak Ektar 100 film simulation recipe, which are the pictures that you see here in Part 1, and on the way back down I used my Portra 160 recipe, which you’ll find in Part 2.

Ektar is a color negative film made by Kodak. It’s known for vibrant colors, high contrast and fine grain. It’s the closest negative film to reversal film. In fact, when Kodak discontinued Ektachrome 100VS, they recommended Ektar 100 as the best alternative. It’s a great film for landscape photography, which is why I chose it for this walk in the park.

Ektar film, and especially this Ektar film simulation, can be difficult to use because of the contrast. With the film, there are things that can be done in development and/or printing to reduce the contrast if it’s too much. With these settings, one could use +2 Shadow instead of +3, which is what the recipe calls for, if they wanted less contrast. These pictures are straight-out-of-camera (with the exception of some minor cropping) with the  settings exactly as the recipe states.

My opinion is that my Ektar recipe is best suited for low-contrast landscapes, where a boost in contrast and vibrancy is needed. But it can do well in other situations, as well. I thought it served this photographic outing well, although it was borderline too contrasty for the scene. Ektar was a good choice for a walk in the park, but was it the best choice? How does it compare to Portra 160? We’ll take a look at that in Part 2.

49831797643_a86d3bc427_c

Sunlight Through The Leaves – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm

49831759703_66a11037ba_c

Old Log – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm

49831759693_576288ea0e_c

Forest Stream – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm

49831755158_caa7133446_c

Stream & Yellow Flower – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm

49831771188_dc961c9e23_c

Single Tree Blossom – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm

49832617177_58700270bf_c

Green Tree, White Tree – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm

49831800563_04247ea9e8_c

Blossoming Branches – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & 35mm

Walk in the Park, Part 2: Portra 160
See also: Film Simulation Reviews

My Fujifilm X-T30 Kodacolor II 126 Film Simulation Recipe

49822797723_42b7ab09ae_c

Blooming Pink – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Kodacolor II 126”

A Fuji X Weekly reader asked me to recreate the look of some old family prints from the 1970’s that he found. After some investigating, it was determined that the pictures were captured on an Instamatic camera using 126 film (also called Kodapak). 126 film was basically 35mm film, except with a paper back and no sprockets (like 120 film), and in a cartridge that didn’t need to be rewound (similar to 110 film). It was intended for low-budget point-and-shoot cameras, and the cartridge made loading and unloading film easier. Basically, Instamatic was Kodak’s attempt to open up photography to the masses, as it required little to no skill or photographic background. It was very popular in the 1960’s and ’70’s, and became less popular in the 1980’s. A quirk of Instamatic cameras and 126 film is that it captured square pictures.

It’s unknown what film was used on the pictures in question, but most likely it was Kodacolor II, which was by far the most popular color 126 film during the time that these pictures were captured. Kodacolor is a name that Kodak gave to a number of different color negative films going back to the 1940’s. Kodacolor II was the very first C-41 process film. It was introduced in 1972 and discontinued in 1981, replaced by Kodacolor VR, which is the film that my Kodacolor film simulation recipe resembles. The prints likely have some fading and color shifts due to age, but they appeared to be in good condition overall.

49827010196_567acc50fe_c

Instamatic – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Kodacolor II 126”

This film simulation recipe, which I’ve called Kodacolor II 126, is a bit unusual in that it is supposed to mimic a look that came from cheap cameras. It calls for Image Quality to be set to Normal instead of Fine (I normally use Fine). The only other recipe that I’ve done this with is my Kodak Elite Chrome 200 Color Fade. I keep the ISO high on this recipe to make it look more grainy. While I’ve done that with several black-and-white recipes, this is the first time I’ve done it with color. This is also the only recipe that calls for the 1:1 aspect ratio, although feel free to use 3:2 or 16:9 if you’d like. These settings pair well with vintage lenses, and if you “miss” focus a little sometimes, well, that just makes it resemble Instamatic even more.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +3
Color: -4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -4
Grain Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Image Quality: Normal
Aspect Ratio: 1:1
White Balance: 6300K, +6 Red & +3 Blue
ISO: 3200 – 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Kodacolor II 126” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

49827009831_a15e7d8efa_c

Polaroid Girl – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49826464188_0cb81edda3_c

Lizard, Boy & Wall – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49826464483_c8f95b6b81_c

Boy in the Alley – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49827005086_8b8694bf97_c

Two Cans – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49826476758_ac6224e28d_c

Suburban House & Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49827324507_cf114c8399_c

Suburban Trees & Distant Mountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49827010456_ded3398919_c

Tree Top & Mountain Top – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49823328906_ab630003ed_c

Suburban April  – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49822797703_81ab4cd6fc_c

Robot in the Window – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49827325207_d3b6531bb6_c

Heart & Soul – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49827324832_b2b25f3460_c

Wreath & Flowers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49826476583_c07a6e6dd4_c

White Paper – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49826998136_f03d029b09_c

Bowl on a Trike – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49826464618_cc4aa2a322_c

Hose & Elephant – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49823647997_87d0d1f9a1_c

Concrete Path – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49823328946_b8b79c8382_c

Little Colorful Chair – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49827311787_d8f53bb45d_c

Summer Chair – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49822797708_686b8a52cb_c

Day Dreaming – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

 

Film Simulation Review: Planting Flowers with “Kodak Gold 200”

49803328793_c3a2b23a82_c

White Tulip Bloom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

Believe it or not, there are over 70 different film simulation recipes on Fuji X Weekly! That’s amazing! There are lots more than I would have guessed before I counted them. And I’m working on even more!

Something I’ve realized is that I haven’t spent all that much time on the practical use of these different recipes. You might not know which ones to choose, or when to use them, or maybe even how to use them. Perhaps you are overwhelmed by all of the options. Maybe you are not sure which ones can be used on which cameras. I haven’t done a great job with this side of it, the practical side. Moving forward I hope to make things easier for you by showing you the “what, where and why” of the different film simulation recipes.

This post is the very tiny tip of what I hope is a great big iceberg of information. I plan to publish many articles that I hope are helpful to you, that answer some of the questions you might have about these recipes. This article is a very simple one: an example of when to use my Kodak Gold 200 film simulation recipe. I get asked often, “What’s the best recipe for this situation?” Whatever that situation might be. I thought it would be helpful to showcase different recipes being used in various situations. I hope to do a whole bunch of these types of articles, and I’m calling them Film Simulation ReviewsYou’ll be able to see a certain recipes used in a certain situation, and you’ll be able to judge for yourself if you like it or not. If you appreciate how a certain recipe looks in a certain case, for example Kodak Gold 200 with flowers and shaded light, which is what you see here, then you can use it yourself when in a similar situation.

My wife, Amanda, was going to plant some flowers in a pot on our porch, and I wanted to capture it. I grabbed my Fujifilm X-T30 and attached a Fujinon 35mm f/2 lens to it. Why this combo? I like that camera and lens; I don’t have a profound answer. Initially I planned to use my Portra 160 recipe, but after judging the light, which was shady and flat, I decided to go with the Gold recipe instead because it has more contrast. I think it was a good choice for this scene. Actual Kodak Gold film was considered a good all-around choice for many situations, so it shouldn’t surprise anyone that the film simulation that mimics it is also good for many different situations.

49803384588_c387c266a7_c

Pot & Soil – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

49803383623_a507c1886e_c

Digging Dirt – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

49804161957_2e0657075b_c

Planting Tulips – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

49803859056_61cd59fac9_c

White Tulip Blossom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

49803860746_9d07fe8418_c

Adding Yellow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

49804163367_91a58a47f3_c

Adding Soil – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

49804140022_e2f30c2085_c

Potted Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

49804119687_0bc5c136cc_c

Just Add Water – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

49803264933_8389a4a4cd_c

Wet Potted Blossoms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

49804120197_82b0631d7f_c

Wet Tulip – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

49804119522_733933c270_c

Porch Blossoms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

49803263508_f47c51355e_c

Potted Blossoms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujinon 35mm f/2

My Fujifilm X-T30 Kodak Gold 200 Film Simulation Recipe

49774488592_c4416b0be1_c

Crown Burger – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Kodak Gold 200”

I’ve been asked countless times to create a Kodak Gold film simulation recipe. I’ve tried several times to make one, but I couldn’t get it quite right. Last week I was scrolling through Instagram and I saw a picture that I thought at first glance was captured using my Portra 160 recipe. It’s not unusual to see pictures that were captured using my different recipes, as some of them have become quite popular. It was an interesting picture, so I took my time looking at it, and as I did I thought that there was just too much saturation, contrast and grain for it to be my Portra recipe, yet it was still very similar. When I read the description I realized that the picture was captured with actual Kodak Gold 200 film! At that moment I knew that I could create a Gold recipe simply by modifying the Portra recipe.

Kodak Gold, which was introduced in the late-1980’s and is still around today, is a general purpose color negative film. It was originally called Kodacolor VR-G, then Kodacolor Gold, and finally Gold. It replaced Kodacolor VR. While the film has been improved a few times over the years, it still looks pretty much the same today as it did in the 1980’s. The film is prone to color shifts, and results can vary significantly depending on how the picture was shot, developed and printed or scanned.

49775604241_eb3ab3b089_c

Flowing Farmington Creek – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Kodak Gold 200”

Even though this Kodak Gold film simulation recipe is very similar to my Portra recipe, it took many experiments to get it right. I tried different combinations of Highlight, Shadow and Color before settling on these settings. I adjusted the white balance shift several times before returning to the same shift as Portra 160. I feel that this recipe is a good facsimile to actual Gold film, although, like all recipes, it will never be exact, as it cannot account for all the variables. It’s pretty close, though, in my opinion. I want to give a special thank-you to Fuji X Weekly reader Piotr Skrzypek for creating the original Portra 160 recipe for X-Trans II, which allowed me to make one for X-Trans III & IV cameras, which in turn made this Kodak Gold 200 recipe possible. This recipe is compatible with X-Trans III & IV cameras.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR-Auto
Highlight: -2
Shadow: +1
Color: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Grain Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect: Off
White Balance: Daylight, +4 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Kodak Gold 200 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

49774539447_f83eb47756_c

Space Communication – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49774554757_6ddca63af1_c

Sky Traffic – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49774241111_d808a43f34_c

Little Grass Runner – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49774647607_89d49eb449_c

Pear Tree Top – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49774647727_d17abe0254_c

Spring Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49774642802_5eda906d40_c

Tree Blossom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49774317051_ac62acc7ab_c

Backlit Pear Blossoms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49773820533_10e0d0b78e_c

Pear Blossom Day – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49771649027_62e6539412_c

Boy in Spring – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49779377162_a007422af1_c

Branch & Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49779386352_0cc466c4f8_c

Pear Blossom Reflection – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49779056351_cce3ae82f3_c

Phragmites – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49774681332_4327c8e0bb_c

Easy Feelin’ – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49774276966_193640a5f7_c

Girl in the Backyard – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49774552622_4f6d42bef8_c

Stages of Tulip Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49774223951_1036a2cd4a_c

Crescent Tulips – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49774350001_9a79bd5789_c

Floral Decor – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49774624137_48c7f13b34_c

Cheese – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49774749733_2f1ea3f63b_c

Grill & Chill – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49774748088_9108979d45_c

No Door Dash in the Drive Thru – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49775610497_8e0dc459bf_c

Corner – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49774574762_73b8733792_c

KFC – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49774565822_beebd84ee1_c

Everette Brown – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49774158171_a07c6929dd_c

Outside 7-Eleven – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49773629303_7481eda440_c

Sunlight Through The Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49773671513_a1f31e341d_c

Tree Trunk Above the Pond – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49773678743_387b21f41a_c

Boulder Above the Pond – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49773631263_612eb2ac63_c

Father & Son Fishing in Farmington Pond – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49773621348_8eae490f67_c

Fishing in Farmington Pond – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49773670208_19b16d4135_c

Staircase Down to the Water – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49775102993_b3afa9e2ef_c

Flowing Creek – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49774488472_0b4e919c89_c

Creek in the Woods – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49775572516_a01c32f1eb_c

Rocky Farmington Creek – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49778078091_601a96a179_c

Winter is Nearly Over – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49778381298_c12282064d_c

Red Car in Green Grass – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49778909706_fe4579f168_c

Bug in the Dirt – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49774157836_9f69d210e5_c

Sunset on Burger Customer Parking  – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also: Film Simulation Recipe

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Kodak & Fujifilm Unite! Sort of….

46602118275_7c1a5c4978_c

When I first started out in photography, two big names in the industry were Kodak and Fujifilm. While they both made cameras, it was not their gear that they were famous for. Kodak and Fujifilm were known for their photographic films. Kodak was the long-standing big dog on campus, while Fujifilm was the distant runner up. Back then, almost everyone used film, as digital capture was new and not particularly good, and so there was a lot of business to be had. These two companies were rivals, and they both battled very hard for your business.

When the film industry collapsed, it was very abrupt. Within a couple of years, both companies went from record profits to full-fledged panic. Film sales dropped about 25% each year for many years in a row. Kodak, the giant in the industry, fell especially hard, eventually going bankrupt. What remained was divided and sold, and Kodak today, in its various forms, is mostly insignificant in the current photographic industry. Fujifilm, on the other hand, made some smart decisions, such as diversifying by applying their unique knowledge to other fields (such as cosmetics and pharmaceuticals), which allowed them to not only survive, but grow. Now photography is a small part of their overall business model, but nevertheless it is a successful and profitable arm of the company. While Kodak had the upper hand for a long, long time, Fujifilm won in the long run.

46502578075_c094641f1a_c

A Kodak Moment – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

When I purchased my Fujifilm X-T30, I wanted to upgrade to a better camera neck strap than the one that came with the camera. I browsed the web for different ones, and I ended up going with a vintage Kodak strap. A cool feature is a built-in film canister holder (it can hold up to three), which is completely useless in today’s photographic world, but would have been handy 20 years ago. I’m not completely sure how old the neck strap is, but it was in great condition, like it was barely used, if used at all. It adds a retro touch that nicely compliments the retro-inspired design of the X-T30.

It might seem strange to put a Kodak strap on a Fujifilm camera. At one time these two companies were serious rivals. Back then I used film made by both of them, as well as other companies like Ilford and Agfa. I supported these companies with my hard-earned dollars. It’s sad that film has become a small niche market. It’s sad that the mighty Eastman Kodak Company experienced such a big fall. I’m happy to display their logo on my gear in honor of the pictures that I made with their products. I’m also happy to use a Fujifilm camera today, as it’s such a great photographic tool. While it may seem unusual to unite these two brands together in this way, I feel privileged to do so, since both have played an important role in my photography.

46602114515_d6e53b077e_c

46602123315_3ea23deaa9_c