Fujifilm X-H1 (X-Trans III + X-T3 & X-T30) Film Simulation Recipe: Everyday Astia

Urban Palm Leaves – Sun City West, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Everyday Astia”

Earlier this year I started a new Film Simulation Recipe series with the intention of customizing each film simulation to optimize the aesthetic that Fujifilm intended. In other words, make a nice-looking recipe that is similar to yet better than the stock look of a film simulation. The first one was called Standard Provia and the second was called Improved Velvia. And then I stopped. Life happened. I took a long road trip. Now I’m living in another state (Arizona instead of Utah), and I’m picking this series back up again, taking a look at Astia.

The Astia film simulation doesn’t much resemble real Astia film—it’s actually closer to Provia 100F, but not a particularly close match to that, either. Even so, it’s actually a nice film simulation that is sometimes a “Goldilocks” option: contrasty but not too contrasty, vibrant but not too vibrant, etc.. Still, it’s one of the film simulations that I least use. Why? In my experience, a lot of times it just seems to lack the classic analog feel that I love; perhaps it is technically excellent but lacking soul. So I set out to give it some soul without significantly changing the overall aesthetic.

Partially Green – Sun City West, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Everyday Astia”

I call this recipe “Everyday Astia” because it is good for everyday photography. It’s great for sunshine and does well in the shade. It’s a good option for portraits. You can use it for street, landscape, or even artificial light photography—it’s highly versatile! This recipe is fully compatible with X-Trans III cameras plus the X-T3 and X-T30. To use it on newer X-Trans IV cameras (plus X-Trans V), set Color Chrome FX Blue to Off, Clarity to 0, and Grain size to Small.

Astia
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +1
Color: -1

Color Chrome Effect: N/A (X-Trans III) or Off (X-T3/X-T30)
Sharpness: -1
Noise Reduction: -4
Grain: Weak
White Balance: Auto, -1 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Everyday Astia” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-H1:

Architecture Abstract – Sun City West, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Striped Directory – Sun City West, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Fading Bloom – Sun City West, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Reaching Pink Flowers – Sun City West, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Empty Patio Chairs – Sun City West, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Welcome Courtyard – Sun City West, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Late Summer Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
10:30 Moon – Sun City West, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Tiny Tower – Sun City West, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Palms & Building – Sun City West, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Architectural Stripes – Sun City West, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Mirror Mirrored – Sun City West, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Headlights – Sun City West, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Aged to Perfection – Sun City West, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Trike Tire – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Backlit Joy – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Happy Jon – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Building Storm Clouds – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1

This “Everyday Astia” recipe compared to “stock” Astia (everything set to factory defaults):

“Everyday Astia” recipe
Astia with everything set to factory defaults

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and nearly 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-Trans III + X-T3/X-T30 Film Simulation Recipe: Melancholy Blue

Pops of Pink – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Melancholy Blue”

For this Film Simulation Recipe I wanted to combine the beautiful blues of the new Pacific Blues recipe with the dark moodiness of the Vintage Agfacolor recipe. The result is a slightly melancholic aesthetic that can also produce dramatic results in certain circumstances. It’s great for daylight photography—delivering interesting (yet quite dissimilar) results in both overcast and bright sunlight conditions, including Low Key photography—and it also seems like a good option for some artificial light situations. Despite its versatility, it’s not a recipe that everyone will love; however, I know that a few of you will really appreciate it.

Unless your camera is an X-Pro3 or newer, you cannot save a white balance shift with your C1-C7 custom presets; however, your camera will remember one shift per white balance type, so if each C1-C7 recipe uses a different white balance type, you won’t have to remember to change the shift when you change recipes. There aren’t very many recipes that use the Incandescent White Balance, but now you have another recipe option if you are using this method.

Enlightened Nature – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Melancholy Blue”

This “Melancholy Blue” Film Simulation Recipe is intended for Fujifilm X-Trans III cameras, plus the X-T3 and X-T30. I used it on my Fujifilm X-H1 and X-T30, and it did well on both. For newer X-Trans IV cameras, set Color Chrome FX Blue to Off, Clarity to 0, and Grain size to… either Small or Large, you’ll have to decide which you prefer.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +3
Shadow: -1
Color: -2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -1
Grain Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect: Off/NA
White Balance: Incandescent, +4 Red & -9 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400

Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to -1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Melancholy Blue” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30 & Fujifilm X-H1 cameras:

Prickly Fruit – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Yellow on Top – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Dark Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Buddies – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Lights Along A Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30
Backyard Blooms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Backlit Trumpets – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Twin Blooms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30
Climbing Trumpets – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30
Bougainvillea Branch – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Block Wall Shadow – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Does Not Stop – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Roof Lines – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly App!

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Fujifilm X-T20 (X-Trans III) + X-T30 Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Ultramax

Street Lamp Sunset – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Kodak Ultramax”

I’ve received a lot of positive feedback from my Fujifilm X100V Kodak Ultramax 400 film simulation recipe, which I published two weeks ago. I’ve had a ton of requests to make a version of this recipe that’s compatible with X-Trans III sensor cameras, plus the X-T30 and X-T3. Well, I’ve done it, and here it is!

This version of the Ultramax recipe is pretty close to the original, but not precisely the same. Because the new cameras—the X100V, X-T4 and X-Pro3—have different tools, that recipe isn’t compatible with “older” Fujifilm cameras, but I made some adjustments and changes, and created this new version, which produces similar results. It’s fully compatible with the X-Pro2, X100F, X-E3, X-T2, X-T20, X-H1, X-T3 and X-T30 cameras. While not 100% exactly the same as the original recipe, it definitely has the same overall Ultramax aesthetic.

Sunstar Through Peach Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 – “Kodak Ultramax”

Ultramax 400 is Kodak’s consumer grade ISO 400 color negative film. Kodak has sold Ultramax 400 under many different names, beginning in 1987 with Kodacolor VR-G 400, rebranded Gold 400 one year later, called simply GC at one point, and finally, in 1997, Kodak settled on Ultramax 400. Kodak still sells Ultramax 400, although it’s not the same film as Kodacolor VR-G 400. This film has been tweaked and updated at least nine times over the years; however, the overall aesthetic is still substantially similar between all variations.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +2
Color: +4
Sharpening: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Grain: Strong
Color Chrome Effect: Off or N/A
White Balance: Auto, +1 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this Kodak Ultramax film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-T20 and X-T30:

Creek – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20
Shadow Catcher – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Boy by a Window – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Jonathan in Window Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Pencils on the Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Balcony – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20
Panda Express – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20
Window Flag – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
American Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Green Mountain Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Summer Pear Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Greens of Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Backyard Tree Evening – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20
Backyard Aspen Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also:
Fujifilm X-Trans III Film Simulation Recipe Compatibility
Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe Compatibility

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Film Simulation Recipe Compatibility: X-Trans III

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Bayer, X-Trans I & II

Those with Fujifilm X-Trans III sensor cameras, which include the X-Pro2, X100F, X-E3, X-T2, X-T20, and X-H1, might be unaware which film simulation recipes to use. I’ve published around 80 different film simulation recipes, so which recipes are compatible with your camera? The answer is simple: all of the ones in the list below:

Velvia
Astia
Classic Chrome
Vintage Kodachrome
PRO Neg. Hi
Fujicolor Superia 800
CineStill 800T
Eterna
Kodak Portra 400
Kodak Ektar 100
Kodak Ultramax
Cross Process
Kodachrome II
Dramatic Classic Chrome
Vintage Agfacolor
Aged Color
Kodak Ektachrome 100SW
Fujicolor Pro 400H
Agfa Optima
Classic Negative
Cine Teal
Acros
Acros Push-Process
Agfa Scala
Ilford HP5 Plus
Tri-X Push-Process
Sepia

If you have an X-Trans III camera, you have many recipes to choose from. Yet you actually have many more options than that. You see, X-Trans IV recipes intended for the Fujifilm X-T3 and X-T30 (not the X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4, as that’s a whole other situation) are mostly compatible with your X-Trans III camera. The only X-Trans III camera with Eterna is the X-H1, so those X-Trans IV recipes that require the Eterna film simulation will work on that one camera only, and will not work on any other X-Trans III camera. Color Chrome Effect and B&W Toning are the two other features that are added to X-Trans IV. Not all of the X-Trans IV recipes call for those features, which makes those particular recipes fully compatible with X-Trans III. Those that do call for CCE or Toning can still be used, but results will be just a little different. In other words, those X-Trans IV recipes intended for the X-T3 and X-T30 are, for the most part, either fully or mostly compatible with X-Trans III cameras, especially if you have an X-H1, so I invite you to give them a try and see what you think!

X-Trans IV

Fujifilm Classic Chrome Film Simulation Recipes

Classic Chrome is one of the most popular film simulations available on Fujifilm X-Trans cameras. It produces a look similar to quintessential Kodak color transparency films like Kodachrome and Ektachrome, which graced the pages of publications like National Geographic and Arizona Highways for many years. With all things vintage being in style, there is a huge draw to the analog-esque results produced by the Classic Chrome film simulation.

I love Classic Chrome and I have used it as the base for a bunch of different film simulation recipes. It’s possible to achieve a number of different interesting looks straight out of camera by adjusting the settings. Honestly, I think that I’ve only scratched the surface of what’s possible. I plan to create even more film simulation recipes using Classic Chrome in the coming months. As I do, I will add them to this article.

Below you will find all of my different film simulation recipes that I have created that use Classic Chrome. If you haven’t tried them all, I personally invite you to do so and see which are your favorites! My personal favorite is Kodachrome II, but they each have their own usefulness and charm. Let me know in the comments which recipe you like most!

Even though the different recipes say X100F, X-Pro2, and X-T20, they are completely compatible with any Fujifilm X-Trans III or IV camera. For example, you don’t have to use the X100F recipes exclusively on the X100F. You can use any of my recipes on any X-Trans III camera.

My original Classic Chrome recipe.

My dramatic Classic Chrome recipe.

My Vintage Kodachrome recipe.

My Kodachrome II recipe.

My Vintage Agfacolor recipe.

My Kodak Portra recipe.

See also:

My Classic Chrome recipe for Fujifilm Bayer and X-Trans II.

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