The 10 Best Film Simulation Recipes on the Fuji X Weekly App

Fujifilm X-E4 + Fujinon 90mm f/2 + Kodachrome 64 Film Simulation Recipe

“I’m new to Fujifilm,” I’ve heard about 20 times over the last two weeks or so. “Which Film Simulation Recipes are the best?”

With over 250 (and quickly approaching 300!) Film Simulation Recipes on the Fuji X Weekly App, it can be difficult to know which to use. There are so many to choose from! This, of course, is a good problem to have, but a problem nonetheless—especially for those new to Fujifilm cameras and recipes. Where do you start? Which recipes should you try first? Which are the best?

Best is a subjective term, and what I might like best you might not. One person’s favorite might be another’s least favorite. I cannot tell you what you will like, but I can suggest recipes that you might like, because these are recipes that I like. The list below are some Film Simulation Recipes that I believe are the best. Your opinion of them might vary, and that’s just fine because we each have our own tastes and styles. Aside from these, there were probably 25 others that I strongly considered choosing, and I had to reluctantly skip. If your favorite didn’t make this list, please let me know in a comment; if one of these is a favorite of yours, let me know that, too!

If you haven’t yet downloaded the Fuji X Weekly App, be sure to do so for free today!

The 10 Best Film Simulation Recipes on the Fuji X Weekly App

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, but becoming a Patron subscriber unlocks the best App experience. There are several Patron benefits, including Filtering the Film Simulation Recipes by camera or sensor, film simulation, color or B&W, and more. Patrons can Star their favorite recipes and use Colored Stars to organize them into groups. Also, Patrons get early-access to some new recipes months before anyone else (currently, as of this writing, there 13 Early-Access Recipes on the App). Besides all of that, Patrons financially support the work of this website, and it’s a great way to assist current and future projects.

See also: Which Film Simulation Recipes, When?

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-E4 in black:  Amazon   B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-E4 in silver:  Amazon   B&H  Moment
Fujinon 90mm f/2: Amazon   B&H  Moment

Vintage Cinema — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe

Glimpse of a Fleeting Memory – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Vintage Cinema”

I recently binge-watched a number of classic movies from the 1950’s, and I was really inspired by their picture aesthetics. After some research, I discovered that Kodak ECN 5248 25T motion picture film was used in several of these flicks. The problem, of course, with trying to replicate the look of a motion picture film stock is that not only is the aesthetic dependent on the usual factors of how shot and developed, but also on the lighting and filters used, which can be different movie-to-movie and even scene-to-scene. Instead of attempting to mimic the look of any particular movie or cinema film stock, I wanted to create a certain feel or mood—a “memory color” reminiscent of color movies from the 1950’s.

This Vintage Cinema Film Simulation Recipe is a Fuji X Weekly App Patron Early-Access recipe, which means if you are an App Patron, you have access to it right now. The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes, such as this one. These Patron Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App, so I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

Ball on a Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Vintage Cinema”

The Vintage Cinema Film Simulation Recipe, which is the very first Patron Early-Access Recipe for X-Trans V, is only compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S (and I’m sure the X-S20 when it’s released this spring). I assume that the GFX100S and GFX50S II can also use this recipe, but that it will render slightly different—I don’t have either of those cameras to test it to know for certain. This recipe is best for sunny daylight conditions, and seems especially well-suited for golden hour photography, but can sometimes produce interesting results in cloudy, shade, and indoor situations, too. I believe this recipe would pair especially well with vintage lenses and probably diffusion filters, but for these pictures I used Fujinon lenses, including the 27mm f/2.8, 35mm f/2, 90mm f/2, and 100-400mm, without any filters.

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Vintage Cinema” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Birds of a Feather – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Flipped Reflection – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Three Ducks in a Lake – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Bougainvillea Blooms & Blue – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Bougainvillea Beams – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Side Gate Cracked Open – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Bougainvillea Bush in Bloom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Hanging Bougainvillea Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Desert Bunny – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Jo on a Dirt Path – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Jo on the Patio – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Late Autumn Yellow – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Leafless Tree – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Do Not Enter When Flooded – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Dry Leaves on a Patio Chair – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Pruner & Gloves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Fruit – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H  Moment

Vintage Bronze — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Autumn Rainbow – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Vintage Bronze”

This Vintage Bronze Film Simulation Recipe was an accident. It came about when Fuji X Weekly reader Dan Allen was first trying Anders Lindborg‘s Ilford FP4 Plus 125 recipe, and he accidentally selected the Eterna Bleach Bypass film sim instead of Monochrome. The results were pretty interesting, with a vintage alternative-process aesthetic—which I happened to really like—so I decided to make it an official recipe.

The Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulation is intended to replicate the look of motion picture film that has had the bleach step reduced or skipped. With this Vintage Bronze Film Simulation Recipe, there are some similarities to that (Michael Radford’s 1984 comes to mind), but it also reminds me a little of Kodak ColorPlus film cross-processed in E6 chemistry. Obviously, it’s not modeled after any specific film or process, so any similarities are simply happy accidents. I don’t think this recipe is necessarily a close facsimile to bleach-bypassed motion picture film or cross-processed ColorPlus, and not really an exact match to anything that I have seen, but it’s in the general neighborhood of those alternative-process aesthetics. I think an argument could be made that Kodacolor that’s faded a little is also somewhat similar.

Paperflowers – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Vintage Bronze”

Because of the blue color rendering difference between X-Trans IV and V, this Vintage Warm Film Simulation Recipe is only compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S. You can use it on those X-Trans IV cameras with Eterna Bleach Bypass, but the rendering will be slightly different (give it a try anyway). I assume that the GFX100S and GFX50S II can also use this recipe, but that it will render slightly different—I don’t have either of those cameras to test it to know for certain.

Film Simulation: Eterna Bleach Bypass
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome FX Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, +6 Red & -8 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: 0
Shadow: -1
Color: 0
Sharpness: -2

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -2
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -2/3 to 0 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Vintage Bronze” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Sunset Over White Truck – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Ford Wagon – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
5 & 6 – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Cart Lock – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Bus – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Jon in December – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Johanna & Lens Flare – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Outdoor Lightbulbs – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Projector – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Abstract Snow – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Christmas Song – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Winter Guitar – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
A Gift For You – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Joy, Unsure – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Reading the Paper in December – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Sprinkled Donut – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Softdrinks – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Rudolph – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H  Moment

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Introducing Fuji X Weekly App Widgets for iOS!

The Fuji X Weekly App now has Widgets! This can transform how you use the Fuji X Weekly App, turning your home screen into a Film Simulation Recipe launchpad!

If you have an iOS device, you now have this new feature—if your iPhone or iPad didn’t update automatically, be sure to manually do it now. Those with Android devices don’t fret, as Widgets are in the works for Android, too.

What are Widgets? Larger than app icons, Widgets give you quick access to information or provide a different way to interact with the app. Specifically to Fuji X Weekly, you now have six Widgets to choose from: Newest Recipes (one recipe), Newest Recipes (two recipes), Recipe of the Day, Selected Recipe, Recipe Detail, and The Big X.

For Newest Recipe Widget, you have two options: small and medium. The small Widget is a shortcut to the newest recipe, and displays the lead photo of the recipe, which, when tapped, will take you right to it in the Fuji X Weekly App. The medium Widget is a shortcut to the two newest recipes, displaying the lead photo of each, and will take you to whichever of the two recipes that you tap. These Widgets are excellent for those who don’t always visit the Fuji X Weekly Blog, yet want to know when a new recipe is released.

The Recipe of the Day Widget is for when you’re not sure which recipe to use. Each day a new Film Simulation Recipe is provided, and the exact recipe will be different for each user. Between this and the Random Recipe selector, you should be able to find a recipe to use whenever you find yourself stuck for one. This Widget could be incorporated into an interesting project, such as using a different recipe each day for 30 days, or something like that. Today, on my iPhone, Kodak Portra 400 v2 is my Recipe of the Day.

Next is Selected Recipe, which is my personal favorite Widget. You can have quick access to any of the over 250 recipes right on your home screen! In order to use this, you have to tap-and-hold on the Widget, then select Edit Widget, then choose the recipe you want. Tap the Widget to open the recipe in the Fuji X Weekly App.

Recipe Detail displays the parameters of a recipe in a medium-sized Widget. To set it up, you have to tap-and-hold on the Widget, then select Edit Widget, then choose the recipe you want to display. Tap the Widget to see the recipe in the App.

Finally, there’s the Big X, which is just a four-times-size Fuji X Weekly App icon, should you find the regular-sized one to be too small.

The wonderful thing about these Widgets is that you can have as many as you’d like. If you want just one, or seven, or 20—there’s no limit! My iPhone has literally been taken over by Fuji X Weekly Widgets, and it’s transformed how I interact with the App, turning my home screen into a Film Simulation Recipe launchpad.

How do you add Widgets to your iPhone? Tap-and-hold anywhere on your home screen (except directly over an app icon), which will make all of your icons wiggle. Tap the plus in the top-left corner, which opens the Widget menu. You can either scroll down to find the Fuji X Weekly App in the app list and tap on it, or simply search for Fuji X Weekly in the search bar at the top. Find the Fuji X Weekly App Widget that you want to add to your home screen, and tap Add Widget. You can move the Widget to wherever you want on your home screen. I have several pages that are nothing but Fuji X Weekly Widgets! You can also add Fuji X Weekly Widgets to the Today View screen.

Don’t have the Fuji X Weekly App? Download it for free today (Apple here, Android here)! Consider becoming a Patron to unlock the best App experience and to help support this website.

If you have an iPhone, you should also download the RitchieCam camera app for iOS (click here).

New Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Expired ECN-2 100T

Palm Trunk & Arches – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Expired ECN-2 100T”

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes. These Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many Early-Access Recipes have been publicly published on this blog and the App, so now everyone can use them! Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

Eastman Color Negative II 100T, which was also known as ECN-2 Type 5247/7247, was a 100 ASA Tungsten-balanced motion picture film made by Kodak between 1974 and 1983 (although, apparently, it could still be found and was used into the early 1990’s). A lot of iconic movies used this film for at least some shots, including Star Wars, Back to the Future, Raiders of the Lost Ark, and many more. This Film Simulation Recipe is intended to mimic the aesthetic of this film stock that’s expired and developed in C41 chemistry after having the Remjet layer removed. This recipe isn’t intended to look like the film as it’s seen in the movies, but expired film that’s been developed in C41 chemistry instead of the ECN-2 process.

Truck Tire – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Expired ECN-2 100T”

This “Expired ECN-2 100T” Patron Early-Access Recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. I believe it will also work on the X-H2 and X-H2s cameras, although I have not tried it myself to know for certain. If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the Fuji X Weekly App! If you don’t have the App, download it for free today. A side-note: this is the 250th Film Simulation Recipe in the App!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Expired ECN-2 100T” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Saguaro Green – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Stop, All Ways – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Truck Mirror – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Lightning McQueen’s Home – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Truck – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Texting & Walking – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Bougainvillea Over Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Backlit Bougainvillea & Lens Flare – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Light Pink Blooms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Sunlit Trumpets – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Shaded Hummingbird Feeder – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Sidewalk Chalk & Red Bucket – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Red Soccer Ball – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Friendly Skeleton – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Kodak Instamatic Camera – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4

Fujifilm X-Trans IV + X-H1 FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipes: Vintage Eterna

Bougainville Branch Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Vintage Eterna”
Cactus Spikes – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Vintage Eterna”

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is that you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes. These Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many Early-Access Recipes have already been publicly published on this blog and the App, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new “Vintage Eterna” Early-Access Recipe is a bit unusual in that there are actually two recipes: one for the X-H1, X-T3, and X-T30, and another for newer models (X-Pro3 and newer). The premise was simple: what would the Vintage Kodachrome recipe look like if I used Eterna instead of Classic Chrome? As it turns out, it looks alright; however, after I made more modifications, it looks much better! I initially created this on my Fujifilm X-E4, but then I wanted a version for my X-H1, so I made a recipe compatible with that camera, and even used it on my X-T30. If you have an X-H1 or any X-Trans IV camera, you can use the “Vintage Eterna” recipe—just find the one that’s compatible with your model. For those with the X-H2s (or soon-to-be X-H2), you can use the version of this recipe that’s for the newer X-Trans IV cameras, and it should render pretty much identically on X-Trans V, but I haven’t tried it myself to know for certain. If you have a GFX camera, one of these two recipes will work on the model you have, but it will render slightly differently (try it anyway, though).

If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the App!

Fujifilm X-H1, X-T3, & X-T30 — “Vintage Eterna”

Cloud Above Roof – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Summer Blossoms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Sky Vines – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Backlit Leaves of Summer – Fujifilm X-H1
Hummingbird Feeder – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Golden Trumpets – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Yellow Trumpet Flower – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Red Trumpet Flower – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Garden Wall Light – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, & X-T30 II — “Vintage Eterna”

Labyrinth – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Sky Dome – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Little Desert Berries – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Saguaro & Storm – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Birdie Footprints – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Distant Downtown – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Sky Rays – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Saguaro Silhouette – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Purple Plant – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4

Fujifilm X-Trans IV FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Vintage Print

Bell Tower – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Vintage Print”

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is that you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes. These Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many Early-Access Recipes have been publicly published on this blog and the App, so now everyone can use them! Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This recipe began when my wife suggested that I should try to emulate a certain look that she found. I wasn’t successful, but in my efforts I discovered these settings, which I thought looked interesting nonetheless. They remind me of vintage color prints—not from any specific film or process, but just my “memory color” (as Fujifilm puts it) of some old prints that I’ve seen in the past. It has almost a classic magazine quality to it, or even a bit of a post-card resemblance. Whatever it may or may not look like, it definitely has a vintage-like look that some of you might really appreciate.

All of these pictures were captured using manual vintage lenses, including—actually, mostly—a Helios 44-2. I also used a 5% CineBloom or 10% CineBloom filter with around half of them. I did this to help achieve an analog aesthetic. The use of vintage glass and diffusion filters aren’t required for this recipe, but you are certainly welcome to do so if you want—I think they help a little to take the digital edge off of the pictures.

Suburban Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Vintage Print”

This “Vintage Print” Early-Access Recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. Those with the X-H2s and newer GFX cameras can use it, too (results may vary, though). If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, it’s available to you right now on the Fuji X Weekly App! If you don’t have the App, download it for free today.

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Vintage Print” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Big Storm Looming in the Background – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Lake, House – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Jon Is Happy – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Labyrinth Church – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Saguaro & Dust – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Twin Saguaros – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Saguaro as Seen Through a Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Teddy Bear Cholla – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Desert Spikes – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Desert Barrel – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Trumpets Down – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Bright Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4

Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Eterna Bleach Bypass

Evening on Main – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Eterna Bleach Bypass”

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes. These early-access recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many early-access recipes have already been publicly published on this blog and the App, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

I was challenged by Thomas Schwab to create a Film Simulation Recipe that mimics the aesthetic of the picture in the background of Dan Bailey’s YouTube video discussing the Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulation. There were some challenges, including limited samples (which were viewed on a YouTube video), and the fact that I now live in Arizona and not Utah (no access to majestic snow-capped mountain scenes), but I do believe that I got in the ballpark. This is essentially a “black-and-white” recipe for color photography—capable of producing dramatic near-monochrome images.

Pacific Photographer – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4

Because this “Eterna Bleach Bypass” recipe uses the Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulation, it is only compatible with those cameras that have it, which are the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II. I do believe that this recipe is fully compatible with X-Trans V (currently the X-H2s), but I have not tested it yet to know for certain. Those with newer GFX cameras can also use it, although it will likely render slightly different.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, this recipe is available to you right now on the App!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Eterna Bleach Bypass” on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Suburban Roof Abstract – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
CVS – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Climbing a Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Wall Details – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Bougainvillea & Building Storm – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Clouds Above Mesa – St. George, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Crashing Wave Along Coast – San Simeon, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Backyard Garden Sunbeams – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Garden Trumpet – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Little Bug – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Saguaro Fingers – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Boardwalking – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4

Random Recipe Challenge: 10 Frames with LomoChrome Metropolis

The Fuji X Weekly App has a brand-new feature that’s super fun: Random Recipe! When you tap the criss-crossed arrows at the top-right, the App will randomly select a Film Simulation Recipe for you.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron and you have various Filters selected (such as Filter by Camera, Filter by Film Simulation, Filter by B&W, etc.), the Random Recipe selector will only choose from the list of filtered recipes, so you can have it select from what is compatible with your camera. In my case, I chose “Filter by X-E4” prior to tapping the Random Recipe selector, so only the recipes compatible with the X-E4 were considered.

Here’s a fun way to use this new feature: the Random Recipe Challenge! The rules are 1) use the App to select a Random Recipe for you⁠—whatever it selects you have to use (if you are not a Patron and the App chooses a non-compatible recipe, you can try again until it lands on a recipe that is compatible with your camera)⁠—and 2) shoot with this recipe for 24 or 36 frames (your choice), like it’s a roll of film, before changing recipes. If you post to Instagram, use the hashtag #fxwrandomrecipechallenge. I hope that you have a lot of fun with the Random Recipe Challenge, and I can’t wait to see what you capture!

When I tapped the Random Recipe icon, the App chose for me the LomoChrome Metropils Film Simulation Recipe. I shot 36 frames with this recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4 with a Vivitar 135mm f/2.8 lens attached to it. Below are my favorite 10 pictures of the 36 frames. Enjoy!

Lather – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm
Malnatis Pizzeria – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm
Cheese ‘n Stuff – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm
Local – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm
Umbrella – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm
Empty Hummingbird Feeder – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm
Daylight Bulb – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm
Tree Leaves – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm
Spraying Water – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm
Palm Tree Top – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm

Find the LomoChrome Metropolis Film Simulation Recipe and over 200 others on the Fuji X Weekly App! Don’t have the App? Download it for free today! Become a Patron to unlock the best App experience.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

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New Fujifilm X-Trans IV FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Magenta Negative

Flag & Dome – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Magenta Negative”

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes. These Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many Early-Access Recipes have already been publicly published on this Blog and the App, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This Film Simulation Recipe is intended to mimic the use of a Magenta Color Correction Filter, such as the Tiffen CC30M, which reduces the intensity of green, and is used to combat green color casts. Back in the film days, using Color Correction Filters was common, but it is much less so now, since you can dial in very precise white balance adjustments for whatever the light is; however, you can still use these filters if you want to. Instead of using a magenta filter, you can use this recipe.

Because this recipe uses Classic Negative, it has a generic Fujicolor Superia aesthetic; however, it is not meant to precisely mimic any specific Superia emulsion. The inspiration actually came from a YouTube video by Cammackey, entitled Fujifilm X100V Recipes / Old Film Tricks. While this recipe is a little different than his, it is intended to produce similar results, just without the need of a Color Correction Filter, which his recipe requires. This “Magenta Negative” Film Simulation Recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, it’s available to you right now on the App! Don’t have the App? Download it for free today! Become a Patron to unlock the best App experience and gain early access to this recipe.

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Magenta Negative” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Wet Red Rose – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Flowers by a Rock Wall – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Waterfall in the Ozarks – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Staircase Waterfall – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Unexpected Canyon – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Chapel & Cannon – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Pine Above Rooftop – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Magnolia Flag – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Ozark – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Little Cloud – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Plaza – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Window View – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Spiderweb on a Window – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Abandoned Porch Seats – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Tree Prism – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Ford & Tree Shadows – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Steampunk Art – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4

New: Fuji X Weekly App Update!!

I just published an update to the Fuji X Weekly App! If your device didn’t update the App automatically, be sure to manually do so right now.

What’s in this update?

First is Search. You now have the ability to search for Film Simulation Recipes! This new feature allows you to search for recipes by name to more quickly locate the exact one that you are looking for. If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, the search feature works in conjunction with Filter, so (for example) if you Filter By Camera, only those recipes compatible with your camera will appear when you Search. In other words, all App users get Search, but this feature is even better for Patrons. The ability to search for recipes is a significant improvement⁠—it definitely makes the App more user friendly. On Apple, simply scroll up (drag the recipe list down) and Search will appear towards the top. On Android, tap the magnify glass icon at the top-right and Search will appear.

Next is Random Recipe selector. Not sure which Film Simulation Recipe to use? Let the Fuji X Weekly App decide for you! Tap the crossing arrows icon at the top-right, and the App will randomly select one for you to use. The Random Recipe selector also works in conjunction with Filter, so even though it’s available to everyone, it’s even better if you are an App Patron. This fun new feature is addicting! If you’re in a photographic rut, this might help you get out of it. If there are a couple of you out photographing together, you can make a game out of it. I personally have really enjoyed using the Random Recipe selector, and I think you will, too!

Last but not least, the recipe parameter order has been improved. Unfortunately, the order of settings is different depending on your camera model, and even on the same model the order can be different within the IQ menu vs Custom Settings menu, so it’s not possible for it to be perfect; however, I do believe that the new order will make it a bit easier to program recipes into your camera.

This Fuji X Weekly App update is intended to make recipes easier to find and program, plus add a little fun to the experience. I hope that you find it useful and enjoyable!

Don’t have the Fuji X Weekly App? Download it today!

Not a Fuji X Weekly App Patron? Consider subscribing to unlock the best App experience! Within the App, tap the Gear icon, then select Become A Patron.

New Fujifilm X-Trans IV FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Expired Velvia

Red Blossom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Expired Velvia”

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes. These Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many Early-Access Recipes have already been publicly published on this Blog and the App, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new “Expired Velvia” Fuji X Weekly App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe came about after a Fuji X Weekly reader shared with me some photographs that he had captured on long-expired Velvia 50 color reversal film. He didn’t have the lab adjust the development time for the expired film, so they were all underexposed; however, they turned out really interesting, with an aesthetic that leaned more towards Superia than Velvia. I think this recipe does a great job of mimicking that look. If you are searching for a Film Simulation Recipe that’s a little different, this is one to try! It’s definitely not for everyone, but some of you will love it. It’s compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, it’s available to you right now on the App!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Expired Velvia” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Light Post – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Hotel Door – Flagstaff, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Restaurant – Flagstaff, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Webs We Weave – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Outdoor Chair Cushion – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Jo Playing with Roly Polies – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
A Boy & His Fishing Pole – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Covered Boat Dock – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Lake Houses – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
‘Bout to Blossom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Wet Rose – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Triangles – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Fenced Sun – Amarillo, TX – Fujifilm X-E4
A Whale of a Sunset – Branson, MO – Fujifilm X-E4

Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Pushed CineStill 800T

Snow on the Stormy Mountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Pushed CineStill 800T”

This “Pushed CineStill 800T” Film Simulation Recipe came about after I stumbled across an amazing picture that was captured on CineStill 800T film during daytime with an overcast sky. It turned out that the film was push-processed, but I never learned by how many stops (I’m guessing one-stop). After some extensive Googling, I was able to find several more examples of push-processed CineStill 800T film shot in overcast daytime light. I then set out to mimic that aesthetic on my Fujifilm camera.

Interestingly enough, even though this recipe is intended for daytime photography, it does quite well at night, too; however, I do believe it more faithfully mimics the film in cloudy daytime conditions. It does produce nice results in daylight or night, so feel free to use it anytime. Film can look different depending on how it is shot, developed, or scanned (among many other things). This recipe doesn’t replicate pushed CineStill 800T film under all circumstances, but in certain conditions it’s a good facsimile. I really like how this one looks, and I think some of you will really appreciate it, too!

Book & Minolta – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Pushed CineStill 800T”

Because this “Pushed CineStill 800T” recipe uses the Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulation, it is only compatible with the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. It’s possible that this recipe is also compatible with the GFX100S and GFX 50S II, but I’ve never tested it to be certain. This was a Fuji X Weekly App Patron Early-Access Recipe, so App Patrons have had access to it since October, but now it’s available to everyone! A new Early-Access Recipe replaced it find—it in the Fuji X Weekly App!

Eterna Bleach Bypass
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -0.5
Shadow: -1.5
Color: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: 0
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: 7700K, -9 Red & +5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Pushed CineStill 800T” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Happy Birthday Wish – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Ready To Go Nowhere – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Pipe Door – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Night Urban Path – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Empty Parking Garage – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Empty Harmons Fuel Stop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Night Hydrant – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Wet White Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Little Wild Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Clouds Building Over Green Ridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Pumpkins In A Patch – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Bee Boxes – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Hidden Townhomes – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Winter Dusting – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this Film Simulation Recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: CineStill 50D

Wind from the West – Hammond, OR – Fujifilm X-E4 – “CineStill 50D”

CineStill 50D is Kodak Vision3 50D (a low-ISO daylight color negative motion picture film) with the remjet layer removed so that it can be developed via the C-41 process. I’ve been asked many times to recreate the look of this film for Fujifilm X cameras. I’ve attempted multiple times, but never succeeded—even this recipe I’m a little hesitant to share because it is “as close as I can get” but perhaps not as close as I’d like it to be. I think some of you will really appreciate it, and I hope everyone else can excuse that it isn’t perhaps the most accurate recipe I’ve ever made.

There were a few tricky parts creating this CineStill 50D recipe. First, I’ve never shot the film, and had to rely on examples from the internet. Second, there are at least three distinct aesthetics produced by this film, which I assume is from how it was shot, developed, and scanned. All films can vary in looks depending on a lengthy host of factors, and this one seems especially so. I picked one specific aesthetic that I came across as the basis of this recipe, and I think this recipe mimics that pretty well. Third, I came across an article stating that CineStill 50D scans must be treated as RAW images, as “they’re not finished straight out of the scanner.” That made me wonder how much editing had been done to the picture samples I found—how much of the look was from the film and how much was from the software. These were just some of the challenges.

Spring & Winter on Wasatch – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “CineStill 50D”

Because the film is missing the remjet layer, it is particularly prone to halation, so I used a 10% CineBloom filter for a couple of these pictures (such as the one above) to mimic that. I don’t think it helped as much as I thought it might, so I discontinued that pretty quickly, but it certainly something you can try. I think this recipe looks best in direct sunlight. Under overcast, shade, indoor, or nighttime light it can produce interesting results, but is “most accurate” to the film when photographing in blue-sky daylight. Because it uses Clarity, this recipe is not compatible with the X-T3 and X-T30; however, if you use a diffusion filter—such as 10% CineBloom or 1/4 Black Pro Mist—in lieu of Clarity, that will give you similar (but not identical) results.

Astia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -1
Shadow: 0
Color: -4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: 0
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: 6800K, -5 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “CineStill 50D” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Seagulls Circling Haystack Rock – Cannon Beach, OR – Fujifilm X-E4
Small Church – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Cracker Barrel – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Bread Truck – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Red Flag Truck – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Tulip Sale – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Tree & Block Wall – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
House in the Trees – Hammond, OR – Fujifilm X-E4
Country Barn – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Shrub at Night – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Playing Games – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-Pro1 (+ X-E1) FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Color Analog

109 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Color Analog”

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly App Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes. These Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many Early-Access Recipes have already been publicly published on this blog and the App, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

For this Film Simulation Recipe I didn’t attempt to model any specific film; instead, I wanted a low-saturation, low-to-mid contrast recipe that would remind me of color negative film. I wanted it to be warm, but not overly warm. After several tries, I landed on some settings that I liked. While I didn’t have any film in mind when I created this recipe, it is vaguely reminiscent of Kodak Portra 160 NC, which was a “neutral color” (low-saturation) version of Portra film that was around from 1998 to 2010, when it was discontinued. It’s not an exact match to that film, but is simply by chance in the neighborhood of it. As Lefty Gomez famously said, “I’d rather be lucky than good.”

Sunset Branch – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Color Analog”

I think this recipe is a good “everyday” daylight option. If I were to suggest C1-C7 Custom Presets for the X-Pro1, this is one that I would include. I would also consider Color Negative Film, either Kodachrome I or Kodachrome II, Vivid Color, Superia Xtra 400, and Monochrome. I know that’s only six (not seven), but you wouldn’t have to remember to change the White Balance Shift when switching presets because each of these calls for a different White Balance type. I suppose I’ll have to create a recipe to fill that seventh spot (actually, I’m already working on it…), but in the meantime you could pick one other recipe—you’ll just have to remember to switch the shift when changing presets—or leave the seventh spot empty.

This new Patron Early-Access recipe is compatible the Fujifilm X-Pro1 and X-E1 cameras. Those with X-Trans II and Bayer cameras can also use it, although the results will be just a little different. If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, it’s available to you right now on the App!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Color Analog” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-Pro1:

Daffodil Garden – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Daylight Pines – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Pear Blossom Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Creek Rocks – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Newly Bloomed – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
White Fruit Tree Blossoms – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Round & Red – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Aperture Artifact Apparition – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Sunlight Through Tree Branches – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Suspended Sun – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Reflection Structure – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Train 16 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-Trans III (+ X-T3 & X-T30) FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Pro

Last Light on Brush – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Fujicolor Pro”

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly App Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes. These Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many Early-Access Recipes have already been publicly published on this blog and the App, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This “Fujicolor Pro” recipe is intended to produce a nice analog-like color-negative-film aesthetic with a classic Fujicolor palette. Those with cameras older than the X-Pro3 don’t have access to the Classic Negative film simulation, and there’s no substitute to mimic Classic Negative, so I wanted to create a next-best-thing recipe. While I didn’t attempt to mimic any specific film, I had Fujicolor Pro 160NS in my mind as I made this. There are already recipes for that film (here and here), and this recipe isn’t “better” than those two, but more of an alternative version that you might really like. I also had pulled-process Fujicolor Pro 400H on my mind (there’s also already a recipe for that); again I didn’t necessarily try to mimic that film and process specifically, but had the intention of producing a general Fujicolor Pro “memory color” (similar to what I did with my Nostalgic Color recipe). This “Fujicolor Pro” recipe is a good all-around option that works well in a variety of daylight situations.

Parking Garage – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Fujicolor Pro”

This “Fujicolor Pro” Patron Early-Access Recipe is compatible with Fujifilm X-Trans III and X-T3 & X-T30 cameras. For those with newer X-Trans IV cameras, set Color Chrome FX Blue to Off, Clarity to 0, and I’d suggest Grain size Small.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, it’s available to you right now on the App!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Fujicolor Pro” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-H1:

Stairs Up – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Main St. Market – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Yellow Among Green – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Frary Peak Sage – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Great Salt Lake Rocks – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Lake Between the Rocks – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Salt Lake From Antelope Island – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Island Brush – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Jetty – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-H1
Sunset Over Salt Lake – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X-H1

Find this Film Simulation Recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-Trans III + X-T3 & X-T30 Film Simulation Recipe: Kodacolor VR

Inside City Creek – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Kodacolor VR”

This Film Simulation Recipe was an experiment. I started out with my Fujicolor 100 Industrial recipe, but instead of using a cool White Balance with a warm White Balance Shift, I did the opposite: I used a warm White Balance with a cool shift. After many adjustments to various settings, this ended up not resembling the Fujicolor 100 Industrial recipe much at all, but it does have a great vintage print-film aesthetic that I really like.

I wasn’t sure at first which film this recipe most closely resembled (since it wasn’t intended to mimic any specific film), although it seemed to have some similarities to Kodacolor VR. I already have a Kodacolor recipe (plus a variant of it), which does a great job at mimicking Kodacolor VR; this recipe and that one look somewhat similar, but definitely different. Then I ran across some pictures that looked very similar to the ones you see in this article, and it turned out that they were shot on Kodacolor VR film that had expired. So I think this recipe, while it does resemble Kodacolor VR, as well as ColorPlus 200 (which is a direct descendant of that film), it most closely looks like Kodacolor VR that’s been stored a little past its expiration date. Of course, one film can have many different looks, depending on how it was shot, developed, scanned and/or printed, and (in this case) stored, so this recipe serves as a nice alternative to my original Kodacolor recipe.

Leaning Tower – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Kodacolor VR”

This “Kodacolor VR” recipe was originally a Patron Early-Access Recipe, but is now available to everyone! If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, there is a new Early-Access Recipe that replaced this one, so be sure to look for that. This recipe is compatible with Fujifilm X-Trans III and X-T3 and X-T30 cameras. For those with newer X-Trans IV cameras, set Color Chrome FX Blue to Off, Clarity to 0 (or perhaps -2), and I’d suggest Grain size Large, but use Small if you prefer.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +1
Color: +2
Sharpness: -1
Noise Reduction: -4
Grain: Weak
Color Chrome Effect: Off
White Balance: 10000K, -7 Red & +8 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Kodacolor VR” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

Summer Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Corner Through Leaves – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Stones & Glass Ceiling – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Glass – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Building a Building – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Small Spaces Between – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Twilight Telephone Poles – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Stoneground – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Goes for Gold – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Night Parking – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Doki Doki – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Escalators – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Downtown Buildings – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Coming Train – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Trax – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Waiting on the Platform – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Glass & Sky – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Tall Downtown Buildings – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-Pro3 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Agfa Ultra 100

Mutual Conversation – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Agfa Ultra 100”

Agfa Ultra 100 was a short lived film—introduced in 2003 and discontinued in 2005, although it was still available for a few years after—and was Agfa’s most vibrant color negative film. I’ve been attempting to mimic this film for a little while now (ever since I published the AgfaChrome RS 100 recipe last summer), but I couldn’t get it right. This Agfa Ultra 100 recipe actually has some similarities to the AgfaChrome RS 100 recipe, and (for this particular attempt) I used that recipe as the starting point. I never used this film, so I relied on online references and a couple pictures I found in an old magazine article as samples.

I’m actually not fully satisfied with this recipe. I think sometimes it’s pretty spot-on, and I think other times it is significantly off. Of course, one film can have several different aesthetics depending on how it was shot, developed, scanned and/or printed, and viewed, so perhaps that accounts for some of it. I think an argument can be made that Color should be +3 or even +4, but I also feel that sometimes that’s too much and +2 is just right. I think green is the least correct color, and if you do have a lot of green in the shot, you might consider increasing Color to +3 or +4 for a more accurate facsimile, although you might find reds and blues are rendered too strong if you do that.

Urban Sunstar – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Agfa Ultra 100”

Because this recipe uses Classic Negative, Clarity, and Color Chrome FX Blue, this Agfa Ultra 100 film simulation recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: -2
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -1
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Daylight, -2 Red & +3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs captured using this “Agfa Ultra 100” film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-Pro3:

Red – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Blu – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Orange – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Walker Reflected – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Common Signs – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Pitched In Street Sign – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Elevator – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Street Crossing – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Sidewalk Seat Shadow – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Blue Boxes – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Urban Congo – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Sidewalk Closed In 150 Feet or Less – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-Pro3 Amazon B&H
Fujifilm X100V Amazon B&H
Fujifilm X-T4 Amazon B&H
Fujifilm X-S10 Amazon B&H
Fujifilm X-E4 Amazon B&H
Fujifilm X-T30 II Amazon B&H

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-Pro3 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Vintage Color v2

February Reaching – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Vintage Color v2”

This “Vintage Color v2” recipe is a modification of the original Vintage Color Film Simulation Recipe. In the comments, Thomas Schumacher suggested using Classic Negative instead of Eterna. Sometimes when you try a different film simulation than what the recipe calls for, you discover interesting results. Well, I gave it a try and loved the results; however, I made a couple more modifications. Because Classic Negative has a lot more contrast built into it than Eterna, I chose DR400 (instead of DR200) to help prevent clipped highlights. Classic Negative also has more saturation than Eterna, so I set Color to -1 (instead of +1). I also changed Clarity to -3 (instead of -2) just to soften it a tad. The results produced by this “Vintage Color v2” recipe can be absolutely fantastic!

This recipe has almost two different looks, depending on the exposure. You can reduce exposure a little—go almost low-key—and get a wonderfully moody feel. You can also increase exposure a little—go almost high-key—and achieve something somewhat similar to overexposed Fujicolor Pro 400H. You can get beautiful pictures either way. Or split the difference and still get excellent results.

Pillars – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Vintage Color v2”

This “Vintage Color v2” recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. As a reminder, Clarity causes the camera to pause for a moment after each shot. I use the pause to slow myself down, but if you need to be quick, and if you shoot RAW+JPEG, you can always set Clarity to 0, and add it later by reprocessing the RAW file in-camera.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +3
Color: -1
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -2
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: 7350K, -1 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs captured using this “Vintage Color v2” film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-Pro3:

High Rise & Moon – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
KeyBank – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Bronze Building – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Bank Above Macy’s – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Boy With Nerf Gun – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Fake Succulent on Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
House At Last Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Winter Bloom Remnants – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Frozen Pond near Sunset – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Grass & Frozen Waterway – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Wild Gold – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3
Backlit Marsh Reed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro3

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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New Fujifilm X-Trans IV Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Fujichrome Provia 100F

Berry Behind the Baseball Diamond – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujichrome Provia 100F”

The Fuji X Weekly app is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new film simulation recipes. These Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, all of the original Early-Access Recipes have been publicly published on this blog and the App, so everyone can now use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App, so I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new recipe is called “Fujichrome Provia 100F” after the film that it is intended to mimic. Fujifilm introduced Provia 100 in 1994, and replaced it with the much improved Provia 100F in 2001. I’ve only shot a couple of rolls of Provia 100F. I remember that it had a cool color cast (especially when compared to Kodak films), it had a fair amount of contrast, moderate saturation, and tended to render blues strongly. This recipe has been in the works for awhile, with a lot of failed attempts. I think it does pretty well at reproducing the aesthetic of the film, but there are definitely a few compromises—more of the “memory color” that Fujifilm talks about, than perhaps a 100% accurate rendition. Still, I believe that it turned out pretty well overall.

Actual Fujicolor Provia 100F 35mm film. Chicago, 2005.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the App!

Example photographs captured using this “Fujichrome Provia 100F” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Wasatch Front – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Blue Sky Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Branch Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Baseball Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Windsock – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Field 3 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Skateboard & Runner – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Creek Under Branches – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Trail Through the Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fence Along Path – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Josh at the Court – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V