Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Positive Film

Approaching Storm at Last Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Positive Film”

I was attempting to create a film simulation recipe that mimicked the aesthetic of Saul Leiter. The problem with this task is that Saul used many different films over the years; while he had a unique and recognizable style, his exact aesthetic varied significantly. These settings can sometimes mimic his look, but sometimes not, so I wouldn’t call it a success, but I just love how this recipe looks—that’s why I’m sharing it. If you’re attempting to recreate Saul’s aesthetic, this recipe is a good starting point. Another one to try is “Old Kodak“—available (as of this writing) as a Patron early-access recipe on the Fuji X Weekly app.

I think this recipe is in the ballpark of the “Positive Film Effect” on Ricoh GR cameras—perhaps not an exact match, but definitely a similar feel, which is why I named this recipe “Positive Film.” There’s a likeness to Kodak Elite Chrome or maybe Ektachrome 100G, although (again) it’s more of a similar feel than an exact match. Whether this recipe is close to Saul Leiter’s look, Ricoh Positive Film, or a Kodak transparency is debatable; what’s not debatable is that this recipe looks really, really good!

Blacktop Lines – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Positive Film”

You might notice that I used a similar White Balance and White Balance Shift technique as my Fujicolor 100 Industrial recipe. Because it uses the Classic Negative film simulation, Color Chrome FX Blue, and Clarity, this recipe (as of this writing) is only compatible with the Fujifilm X-E4, X100V, X-Pro3, X-T4 and X-S10 cameras.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +2
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpeness: -2
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: 2950K, +7 Red & -9 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Positive Film” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Sunset Behind Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Mountain Ridge & Rainbow Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Dark Sky Behind Francis Peak – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Blue Ridge Storm – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
White House – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
House in Last Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Low Sun Behind Pines – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Light on the Treetop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Suburb Home – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Turnstile – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Wristbands – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Wet Benches – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Red Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Underground Mini – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Garage Pole – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Sliced – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Empty Chairs – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
In Window Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Tiny Wet Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
T – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

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Fujifilm X-Trans IV (X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 & X-E4) Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor NPS 160 Pulled

Sunlight Through The Forest – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor NPS 160 Pulled”

Fujifilm introduced Fujicolor NPS 160 sometime in the 1990’s. It was a low contrast, low saturation color negative film intended for portrait photography. Fujifilm replaced it in 2004 with Fujicolor Pro 160S (later renamed Fujicolor Pro 160NS). I actually shot a few rolls of NPS 160 back in the day, and a picture of my parents captured with this film hangs an a wall in their house. Pulling the film, which is a technique where you overexpose and reduce development time to compensate, further reduces the contrast and saturation. This recipe looks a lot like NPS 160 that’s been pulled.

This Fujicolor NPS 160 Pulled recipe was created by Thomas Schwab, who has made several film simulation recipes published on this website, including Superia Xtra 400Urban Vintage ChromeKodachrome II, Kodak Portra 800 v2Classic MonochromeB&W Superia, and Monochrome Kodachrome. Thomas has also collaborated on other recipes, playing an important role in getting them right, including Kodak Portra 800Kodak Ektar 100Kodachrome 1Kodak Portra 400, and Kodak T-Max 400. Some of Thomas Schwab’s pictures that he captured with this recipe can be found further down.

Empty Garage – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor NPS 160 Pulled”

What I especially love about this recipe is that it has a soft feel that’s just wonderful. It has a film-like quality to it that’s easy to appreciate. I really love shooting with this recipe! Because it required the Classic Negative film simulation, Color Chrome FX Blue and Clarity, it’s only compatible with the Fujifilm X-E4, X100V, X-Pro3, X-T4, and X-S10 cameras.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: -2
Color: -4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpeness: +1
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Auto, -1 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor NPS 160 Pulled film simulation recipe:

Thomas Schwab

Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab

Ritchie Roesch

Evening Condos – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Country Trailers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Farm Dirt – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Sunlight Through Forest Branches – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Forest Trail – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Fresh Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Ghost Bike Ahead – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Bunch of Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Peace – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Building Legos – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Jon on a Couch – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

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7 New Fujicolor Pro 400H Film Simulation Recipes!

Pink Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Fujicolor Pro 400H Box Speed”

In my last post, entitled A Different Approach, I shared Anders Lindborg‘s new take on film simulation recipes, which included seven different Fujicolor Pro 160NS recipes that he invented. This is Part 2 of that article. Below you’ll find another seven recipes, this time for Fujicolor Pro 400H! If you haven’t read the first post, you’ll want to do that now, because this will make a lot more sense if you have that prerequisite understanding.

If you don’t want to take the time to read it (or if you’ve already forgotten), here’s a quick summery. Anders’ approach is to have a good base recipe that works well in most circumstances, but also have subtle variations of that recipe, that mimic pushed and pulled film, for when the conditions require either less contrast (pulled) or more contrast (pushed). You can use all seven Custom Presets in the Q Menu to save each of these recipes if you want, or just save the base recipe (called “Box Speed”) and adjust to the various variations on-the-fly, or save the base setting and have the variations programmed into X RAW Studio. Also, by design these recipes will work with any film simulation, even though they call for PRO Neg. Hi.

Like the 160NS recipe, I’m only including the “Box Speed” version in the Fuji X Weekly app, and I encourage you to use the Notes section under the recipe to store the pushed and pulled variations. These seven Fujicolor Pro 400H recipes are compatible with the Fujifilm X-T3 and X-T30 cameras. If you have a newer X-Trans IV camera (X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4), Anders recommends setting Clarity to -3 and Grain to Weak & Large. If you have an X-Trans III camera, ignore Color Chrome Effect; the results will be slightly different, but it will still produce good results. For Pushed +3 and Pushed +4, feel free to try Grain Strong.

This recipe wasn’t intended to mimic Fujicolor Pro 400H film, but it does resemble it fairly well. A lot of people like to overexpose real 400H film to get a pastel look; unfortunately, this recipe won’t achieve that particular aesthetic (but look here and here). Anders created this recipe by modifying his Pro 160NS settings; I made a couple of small modifications to it, but mostly these settings are created by him. Thank you, Anders, for creating these recipes and allowing me to share them!

Fujicolor Pro 400H Box Speed

Pops of Red – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: 0
Color: +1
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Free Pie – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Birthday Girl Coloring – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Shelf Plant – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 400H Pulled -1

Snail – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -1
Color: +1
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pulled -1: HL & SH -1.

Green Aspen Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Tank Cars – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Yellow Cat – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 400H Pulled -2

Hazy Mountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: -1
Color: 0
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pulled -2: HL -2, SH -1, CLR 0.

Box Cars – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Suburban Sunset – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Hazy Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 400H Pushed +1

Yucca Leaves – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: 0
Color: +1
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pushed +1: HL +1.

Red Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Tree & Dark Clouds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
David Baldwin – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 400H Pushed +2

Wood Stripes – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: 0
Color: +2
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pushed +2: HL +2, CLR +2.

Mountain Biking – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Radar Mountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Bloomin’ Onion – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 400H Pushed +3

Three Artificial Plants – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +1
Color: +3
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pushed +3: HL +2, SH +1, CLR +3.

Berry Bush Leaves #1 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Berry Bush Leaves #2 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Sky Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 400H Pushed +4

Old Phone – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +3
Shadow: +2
Color: +4
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -4
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pushed +4: HL +3, SH +2, CLR +4, SHARP -4.

Berry Bush Leaves #3 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Green – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Landscape Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Below are examples of using the Fujicolor Pro 160NS Box Speed recipe using other film simulations. You can do this with all of the pull and push variants, too, although I didn’t supply any examples of those because this article is already very long.

PRO Neg. Hi “Box Speed”
Provia “Box Speed”
Velvia “Box Speed”
Astia “Box Speed”
Classic Chrome “Box Speed”
PRO Neg. Std “Box Speed”
Eterna “Box Speed”
Acros “Box Speed”
Monochrome “Box Speed”

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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A Different Approach + 7 New Fujicolor Pro 160NS Film Simulation Recipes! (Yes, 7!)

Pink Paper Blossom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Fujicolor Pro 160NS Pulled +2”

I received an email the other day from Anders Lindborg with this subject title: A Different Approach. Anders created the Kodak Tri-X 400 film simulation recipe, which is my personal favorite for black-and-white photography. I was immediately intrigued, and I was not disappointed as I read his message. I’ll let Anders explain this new approach below as he described it to me.

“Doing professional work is tough. Since getting a Fujifilm X-T3 (and later an X-Pro3), I’ve come to rely totally on the straight-out-of-camera JPEGs. They look great and I get more jobs just because I can deliver good results fast. After diving deep into the Fujifilm film simulations, I’ve come to realize that you cannot create a single recipe that will always look great. Sometimes the sunlight is so strong that everything gets blown out and the next day the same recipe will make everything look murky and dull.”

“Coming from a film background, I’m reasonably used to pushing and pulling film as needed. With cheap consumer film stocks, you could sometimes get absolutely horrific (or ”creative” as some call them) results, but the professional films were often quite predictable. Some film stocks have become legendary because they really could take a good beating, no matter how you treated them. Also, the exposure latitude of film is insane compared to digital, which is something I really have missed since switching. Awhile back I started experimenting with recreating this, but I slowly realized that it would require several different variations of my settings. When I was finished, I had used up all seven slots! A lot of research and assumptions went into the process. For example, I totally assume that Fujifilm knows what they’re doing and that their stock simulations are good. I can honestly say after all this, that—yes—they do know their game!”

“The settings emulate a flexible film look. They serve as a base that can be modified as needed on the spot via the Q Menu (for example: changing film simulation, white balance, tint, dynamic range, etc.). The objective was to always have working settings for any scenario that emulates how professional film behaves when being pushed or pulled. They’re intended for professional use and come out of both a need and want for realistic film-like simulations that are guaranteed to work, no matter what task I’m currently challenged with. Of course it’s up to the end user to tune it to their specific preferences, but I strongly recommend you leave the highlight/shadow settings as-is. They are heavily tested with all standard film simulations and you will get a nice looking result with them. These settings took me a couple of years to develop, but this is what I actually use every day now.”

“Just step outside and try to come to a conclusion about what the current weather and light conditions are like. If the sun is harsh, you need to pull. If the sun is blindingly bright, pull two steps. The same goes for pushing. If you’re missing just a bit of light, push one step. If it’s dull, push two steps. The third and fourth push settings are perhaps a bit special as the contrast starts to increase. On a regular day, of course you use the box speed setting. Once you’ve selected your setting for the day, stick with it! This is the key to consistent results.”

“I recommend shooting RAW+JPEG and having the settings stored in X Raw Studio. RAWs are great to have if you aren’t happy with the results of your selected setting. The settings were created for the Fujifilm X-T3, but can be easily adapted to taste on any X-series camera. On my X-Pro3, I set Clarity to -3 and Grain to Weak & Large on all slots.”

Thank you, Anders Lindborg, for creating and sharing this new approach!

Pink Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “fujicolor Pro 160NS Pulled -1”

For those without a film background, let me briefly explain what pushing and pulling means in film photography. Film is rated at a certain ISO, for example ISO 100, ISO 200, ISO 400, etc., which is a measurement of the film’s sensitivity to light (it’s pretty much just like on your digital camera). You can underexpose a roll of film and increase the development time to get correctly exposed pictures, and this is called push-processing or pushing the film. Also, you can overexpose a roll of film and decrease the development time to get correctly exposed pictures, and this is called pull-processing or pulling the film. Pushing the film increases the contrast, vibrancy (for color film), and grain, while pulling the film decreases the contrast, vibrancy (for color film), and grain. With film, you have to push or pull the entire roll and not just one or a few frames.

The genius of Anders’ method is that you can apply this film approach to your digital pictures, and you can do it with as few or as many frames as you wish. You can push one frame, pull the next, and shoot the third at “box speed” (nether pushed nor pulled) if you want. This type of flexibility was unimaginable in the film era!

In case you didn’t understand this approach, let me rephrase it. You have one recipe, but that recipe has push and pull variants. You can use any film simulation with the recipe, and Anders’ film simulation of choice is PRO Neg. Hi, but try any of them! The rest of the settings stay the same. His push and pull variants don’t necessarily represent stops of pushing or pulling, but more like half-stop increments (although Fujifilm lenses have 1/3 stop increments, but don’t worry about that). You can dedicate slots in your Custom Settings Menu for the recipe and variants, or you can have one Custom Settings slot set to the standard “box speed” recipe and adjust on-the-fly if you have the required changes memorized, or you can do it in X RAW Studio.

Anders actually sent me two recipes. The first, which you’ll find below, is called Fujicolor Pro 160NS. It wasn’t purposely intended to resemble that film, but it nonetheless does, more-or-less. The second, which you can find here), is called Fujicolor Pro 400H. The Pro 160NS recipe is the “standard” one, while the Pro 400H recipe is just a little more bold for when you need a bit more pizzaz.

There are seven versions of the Fujicolor Pro 160NS recipe: Pulled -2, Pulled -1, Box Speed, Pushed +1, Pushed +2, Pushed +3, and Pushed +4. You’ll find each of these below, although the Box Speed version is the only one included on the Fuji X Weekly app. My recommendation is to manually add the other versions into the notes section under the recipe in the app. These seven recipes are compatible with X-Trans III cameras plus the X-T3 and X-T30; for newer cameras Anders recommends setting Clarity to -3 and Grain to Weak & Large. As a reminder, these recipes are intended to look good no matter the film simulation used, despite it calling for PRO Neg. Hi. For Pushed +3 and Pushed +4, feel free to use Grain Strong if you’d like.

Fujicolor Pro 160NS Box Speed

Two Broken Cars – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: 0
Color: 0
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Old Railroad Sign – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Rainy Day Railroad – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Hazy Mountain & Red Helicopter – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 160NS Pulled -1

Clouds Over Green Mountain – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -1
Color: 0
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pulled -1: HL & SH -1.

Cryo-Trans – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Jonathan – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Orange Flower – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 160NS Pulled -2

Trailer Interior – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: -1
Color: -1
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pulled -2: HL -2, SH -1, CLR -1.

Not Driven – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Americana Country – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Uncertain Walking Path – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 160NS Pushed +1

Green Tree & Storm Clouds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: 0
Color: 0
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pushed +1: HL +1.

Garden Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
F’n’R – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Boy Smile – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 160NS Pushed +2

Worn Seat Abstract – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: 0
Color: +1
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pushed +2: HL +2, CLR +1.

Shasta Trailers – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Onions in Bloom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Flowering Bush – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 160NS Pushed +3

Branches Over Creek – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +1
Color: +2
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pushed +3: HL +2, SH +1, CLR +2.

Two Cows – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Green Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 160NS Pushed +4

Wet Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +3
Shadow: +2
Color: +3
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -4
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pushed +4: HL +3, SH +2, CLR +3, SHARP -4.

Forest – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Wall Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Yellow Bike – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Below are examples of using the Fujicolor Pro 160NS Box Speed recipe using other film simulations. You can do this with all of the pull and push variants, too, although I didn’t supply any examples of those because this article is already very long.

PRO Neg. Hi “Box Speed”
Provia “Box Speed”
Velvia “Box Speed”
Astia “Box Speed”
Classic Chrome “Box Speed”
PRO Neg. Std “Box Speed”
Eterna “Box Speed”
Acros “Box Speed”
Monochrome “Box Speed”

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Portra 800 v2

Flower in a Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Kodak Portra 800 v2”

This Kodak Portra 800 v2 recipe is beautiful! It was created by Thomas Schwab, who has made several film simulation recipes published on this website, including Superia Xtra 400, Urban Vintage Chrome, Kodachrome II, Classic Monochrome, B&W Superia, and Monochrome Kodachrome. Thomas has also collaborated on other recipes, playing an important role in getting them right, including Kodak Portra 800, Kodak Ektar 100, Kodachrome 1, Kodak Portra 400, and Kodak T-Max 400. This new Kodak Portra 800 v2 recipe might be his best one yet!

Kodak introduced Portra 800 in 1998. The Portra line has seen a number of revisions and updates over the years, but I couldn’t find any information if the current Portra 800 film is the exact same emulsion from 1998, or if it’s gone through some changes over the years like the ISO 400 and 160 versions. Portra 800 is one of the best options for high-ISO color photography, but I’ve never shot it myself.

Traffic Cone – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Kodak Portra 800 v2”

Thomas compared images side-by-side captured with actual Kodak Portra 800 film with images captured with his Fujifilm X-Pro3, making numerous adjustments in X RAW Studio, to achieve this nearly-identical picture aesthetic. He put in a lot of work, and it shows! Thank you, Thomas, for creating this great recipe and for your willingness to share! You’ll find some of Thomas Schwab’s pictures below. This Kodak Portra 800 film simulation recipe is currently compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, and X-E4 cameras.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: -2
Color: -4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: -5
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Daylight, +3 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this new Kodak Portra 800 v2 film simulation recipe:

Thomas Schwab

Photograph by Thomas Schwab
Photograph by Thomas Schwab
Photograph by Thomas Schwab
Photograph by Thomas Schwab
Photograph by Thomas Schwab
Photograph by Thomas Schwab
Photograph by Thomas Schwab

Ritchie Roesch

Treetop Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Colorful Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Tree Over Creek – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Log & Flowers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Log & Trail – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Urban Landscape – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
McTrash – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Lobby – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Buckle – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Urban Flower Pot – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Blooms in the City – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X100V (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Pro 400H

Sun-Kissed Forest – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Pro 400H”

This film simulation recipe is one that I’m particularly excited for because I’ve been after this look for a long, long time. The timeline goes as follows: September 2017 I suggested that Fujifilm should make a Fujicolor Pro 400H Overexposed film simulation, October 2018 I made this same suggestion again, December 2018 I published a Fujicolor Pro 400H film simulation recipe for X-Trans III cameras, February 2020 I made a Fujicolor Pro 400H recipe for X-Trans IV cameras, and February of this year I made a Fujicolor NPH recipe (available as a Patron early-access recipe on the Fuji X Weekly App), which is very similar to Pro 400H (NPH was basically an earlier version of the film). Now, I’ve finally made a Fujicolor Pro 400H recipe that I’m quite pleased with. This is an immediate favorite recipe of mine!

After George Coady shared with me his wonderful Fujicolor C200 recipe, he showed me his initial attempt at a recipe for Pro 400H, which inspired me to try my hands at a better Fujicolor Pro 400H Overexposed recipe using the new JPEG options found on the newer cameras, such as Classic Negative, Color Chrome FX Blue and Clarity. At first glance I was disappointed with my results because it didn’t look exactly like what I was hoping for, but then I realized what I actually had created (which I’ll talk more about in just a moment); however, first let’s briefly discuss the film that this recipe is based on.

Table Tulips – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Pro 400H”

Fujifilm introduced Fujicolor Pro 400H in 2004 and it’s been a popular color negative film ever since. Photographers often overexpose this film by as many as four stops. When overexposed, the film turns from a somewhat ordinary high-ISO (that’s what the “H” stands for in the name) portrait film into something almost magical. Colors become vibrant and pastel. The exact look of overexposed Pro 400H varies, depending on how much overexposed, how developed, and how printed or scanned, and the effect can range from subtle to pronounced, but generally you know overexposed Pro 400H film when you see it.

It was that pastel look that I was hoping to achieve with this recipe, and at first I thought I had failed—it looked more like Pro 400H overexposed by one stop or maybe two, but not three or four where the pastel colors are found. Even though I didn’t get that wonderful pastel aesthetic, the recipe looked really great nonetheless. Still, I wondered if it would be possible to get closer to that overexposed look simply by increasing the exposure. Sure enough, it worked! The two images below are examples of this, with exposure compensation set to a whopping +2 2/3!

Toys on a Chair – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Pro 400H”
Messy Hair – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Pro 400H”

As you can see, there are pastel colors in those two pictures, much like well-overexposed Pro 400H film. Does it closely match the film results? It’s closer than my previous attempts, but it’s not perfect. It’s as close as you’re likely going to get straight-out-of-camera. It’s fun to do this, but you’d have to be pretty brave to shoot a wedding with this much overexposure—I’d do it, but, then again, I’ve sandpapered a camera; I have a history of doing some risky (stupid?) things in the name of art.

What about Fujicolor Pro 400H that’s not overexposed? Can this recipe mimic that, too? Yes, sort of. By not overexposing this recipe, you get results that don’t look overexposed (imagine that), but does it closely resemble the film? It’s not as exact as I’d like it to be, but not far off, either. It’s more convincing as an overexposed recipe, but it also does well when not mimicking that. The two pictures below are examples of this, with exposure compensation set at +1/3.

Yard Toys – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Pro 400H”
Ivy Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Pro 400H”

As you can see, there’s a certain beauty in not overexposing when using this recipe.

The two sets of pictures below are examples of +1/3 exposure compensation, +1 1/3 exposure compensation, and +2 1/3 exposure compensation. In my opinion, the best results are found in the middle category, with exposure compensation in the +1 to +1 2/3 range, but sometimes reducing or increasing the exposure produces interesting results. In other words, oftentimes the best results are with exposure compensation set to +1 to +1 2/3, but try anywhere from +1/3 to +2 2/3, because, depending on the light and subject, you can get good results across a large range of exposures.

+1/3 Exposure Compensation
+1 1/3 Exposure Compensation
+2 1/3 Exposure Compensation
+1/3 Exposure Compensation
+1 1/3 Exposure Compensation
+2 1/3 Exposure Compensation

This film simulation recipe (as of this writing) is only compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 cameras. I used a Fujifilm X100V to capture all of the images in this article. For some of the pictures I used a Tiffen 1/4 Black Pro Mist filter to diffuse the highlights, particularly the ones with a bright light source; because you are bumping up the exposure so much, this recipe pairs especially well with a diffusion filter, producing a more film-like result.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: +4
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: 4900K, 0 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1 to +1 2/3 (typically), but try between +1/3 to +2 2/3

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this new Fujicolor Pro 400H film simulation recipe:

Forest of Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Bright Leaf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Pink Flowers & Green Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Spring Sunshine – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Country Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Bright Tree – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Evening Creek – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Tree Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Wild Weeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Field of Wishes – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Make A Wish – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
White Tree Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Forest Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Gnarled Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Creek Trail – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Jon in the Forest – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Trail Bridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Flatcar Bridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Dandelion Bench – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Lighter Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fresh Aspen Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Farmington Creek – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Onion Flower – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Bright Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Rose Bush & Wall – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Rosebush & Vine Ladder – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Ready to Float – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Hide – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Sibling Yard Play – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Kids & Outdoor Table – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Waiting For Food – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Heavenly Hot Cakes – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Smiling Joy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Art & Craft Tray – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Johanna & Jonathan – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fisher Price Phone – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Indoor Basketball Hoop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Slapfish – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Three Fake Plants on a Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

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Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor C200

Blooming Pink – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 “Fujicolor C200”

I’ve been asked at least a dozen times—probably more—to create a Fujicolor C200 film simulation recipe. I’ve tried a few different times, but I never felt that I got close enough. A couple of recipes came out of those experiments, but a C200 recipe remained elusive. The good news is that George Coady (check out his Instagram) figured it out! Yea! George has a lot of experience shooting actual Fujicolor C200 film, and he experimented using X RAW Studio until he got the recipe right. I had a very small hand in tweaking it, but really George did all the work. He gave me permission to publish his recipe here. Thanks, George!

Fujifilm introduced Fujicolor C200 in 1990 as a low-budget, no frills color negative film. I’ve shot several rolls of it over the years, although it was never my go-to option. Fujifilm gave it a small refresh in 2017, and it’s still available today. Even though C200 is a cheap color film, it has a cult-like following, and many people enjoy its aesthetic and choose it over more expensive emulsions.

Red Chairs in a Yard – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Fujicolor C200”

This recipe looks great! In high-contrast situations DR400 does better to protect highlights than DR200, but in low-contrast situations DR200 produces better contrast. After awhile I decided to set my camera to DR400 and adjust it to DR200 when the situation calls for it. The pictures in this article are a mix of DR200 and DR400. The White Balance Shift can be set to -4 Blue, which can sometimes be more accurate to the film, or -2 Blue, which can sometimes be more accurate to the film, because one film can have many different looks depending on how it was shot, developed, and scanned or printed, but -3 Blue does well for all-around use. Because this recipe requires a half adjustment to Highlight & Shadow, it’s only compatible with the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4, although if you use Highlight 0 and Shadow -1 it’s pretty close to the same, which opens it up for use on the X100V and X-Pro3.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400 (DR200 in low contrast situations)
Highlight: +0.5
Shadow: -0.5
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpeness: -3
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor C200 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Red Palms – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Red Chair – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Fairy & Elf – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Throw Pillows – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
R&R BBQ – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Restaurant Counter – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Standing Tall – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Sour Honey – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Large Leaf – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Blooming Branch – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Yellow Bush – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
If a Tree Falls Does Anyone Hear? – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Up The Trunk – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Trailers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X100V (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor Negative

November Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Negative”

Fuji X Weekly Patrons have had early access to this Fujicolor Negative film simulation recipe since the launch of the Fuji X Weekly app, but now it is available to all! What film does this recipe resemble? I’m not completely certain. I was messing around with the settings and stumbled upon something that I liked, which means that this recipe wasn’t intended to mimic any specific film; however, I think it’s kind of similar to Fujicolor F-II or Fujicolor Super G, but it’s not really like either. It does have a vintage Fujicolor vibe thanks to the Classic Negative film simulation that it uses as its base. Whatever film this recipe might or might not resemble, it looks beautiful!

I really enjoy using this recipe—it just produces good results that have a film-like quality. It has good contrast and natural or perhaps somewhat muted colors. This could be my go-to settings for everyday photography—that is, if I wasn’t constantly creating new recipes!

Coming Out of the Shadows – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor Negative”

This Fujicolor Negative film simulation recipe is only compatible (as of this writing) with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 because it uses Classic Negative and Clarity. If you have a GFX camera like GFX-50S that has Classic Negative but doesn’t have Clarity, give this recipe a try anyway—it won’t be exactly the same but should be pretty darn close.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: +3
Color: -4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Auto, -1 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Fujicolor Negative film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Winter Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Small Stop Sign – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Waste Management – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Pile of Pots – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Spilled Sakrete – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Framed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Reserved Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Oh Deer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Book of Film – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Succulent Shelf– Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-Trans I Film Simulation Recipe: Superia Xtra 400

Forest River – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Superia Xtra 400” – Photo by Joy Roesch

I handed my Fujifilm X-M1 camera to my daughter, Joy, and told her that she could change the settings to whatever she wanted them to be—you might remember that she created the Winter Blue film simulation recipe. She used the camera to capture a bunch of pictures; afterwards, when I reviewed the images, I was very impressed with the look that she created. I asked her why she chose these settings, and she answered that she had hoped to capture some cherry blossoms, and it was initially overcast when she dialed in the settings, and she thought that it might work well for that.

These settings remind me of my X-Trans IV Superia Xtra 400 film simulation recipe. It’s definitely not an exact match—there’s no way that it could be because X-Trans I cameras don’t have many of the JPEG options that X-Trans IV cameras have, including the Classic Negative film simulation—but it’s surprisingly similar. I don’t imagine it’s possible to get closer. If you have an X-Pro1, X-E1 or X-M1, this is your best bet for a Superia Xtra 400 look. I think it’s also not far off from my Superia Premium 400 recipe, although, again, it’s not an exact match, just in the general ballpark. For some of you, I have no doubts that this will become your new favorite recipe.

Horsetail Reeds – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Superia Xtra 400” – Photo by Joy Roesch

While this recipe is intended for X-Trans I cameras, it’s possible to use it on Fujifilm Bayer cameras, although it will look slightly different. You can also use it on X-Trans II cameras, but it will look fairly significantly different, although you might like the results anyway, so it might be worth a try.

Astia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -2 (Low)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-High)
Color: +2 (High)
Sharpness: 0 (Normal)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Shade, +2 Red & +2 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured by Joy using her “Superia Xtra 400” film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-M1:

Dirt Cliff Forest – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Sideways Tree – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Photographer Hiding in the Forest – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Forest Creek – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Water in the Woods – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Johanna on a Bridge – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Path Through The Trees – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Small Flower – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
Patch of Red – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch
White Tree – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Joy Roesch

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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My Fujifilm X-E4 Focus Switch & ISO Dial Exclusion Solution

Ever since I published my review of the Fujifilm X-E4, I have received numerous requests to explain my focus switch and ISO dial exclusion solution. It can be difficult to know how to best set up this new camera, especially with the changes that Fujifilm made, and perhaps most puzzling are focus mode and ISO. I don’t know if my settings are best, but hopefully this will be helpful to some of you.

In case you don’t know, Fujifilm removed from the X-E4 the M/C/S focus selector switch that most X cameras have. This switch allows you to quickly and easily go between Manual Focus (MF), Autofocus Continuous (AF-C), and Autofocus Single (AF-S). Instead of a switch, you now have to dig into the menu to change this, which is an inconvenience, to say the least. Fujifilm programmed the X-E4 so that the Focus Mode can be, or really must be, set and saved with each Custom Preset. I have all of my presets set to Autofocus Single (AF-S) because that’s the Focus Mode that I most commonly use. No matter the C1-C7 preset that I choose, it is set to AF-S, and whenever I change presets the Focus Mode will be automatically set to AF-S, whether that’s what I want or not. Most of the time this works well, but not always.

I have AF+MF set to On. I also have MF Assist set to Focus Peak Highlight (I prefer Red) and Focus Check set to On. This is important because most Fujinon lenses are capable of Manual Focus Override, and if you have one of these lenses, when you are in an autofocus mode, if you half-press the shutter you can turn the manual focus ring on the lens and manually focus. Yes, you read that correctly: you can manual focus while in AF-S or AF-C, without setting the camera to MF! Not only that, but MF Assist will automatically activate, and if you are using Single Point AF Mode, focus zoom will also automatically activate. So it’s like setting the focus selector switch to M, except that you stay in AF-S or AF-C. By the way, this isn’t a new feature, and many other Fujifilm cameras are capable of this. It’s pretty slick, and if you’ve never used it you should give it a try.

That works well for Fujinon lenses, but what if you are using a third-party or vintage lens that is manual-only? No matter the Focus Mode you are in, you can press the Focus Stick in to activate Focus Check. You don’t need to be in MF Mode to manually focus, and Focus Check helps to achieve a properly focused image; however, MF Assist will only activate in MF Mode, so Focus Peak Highlight (or whatever you have it set to) won’t activate unless MF Mode is selected. If you don’t need MF Assist, keeping the camera in AF-S or AF-C focus mode even when using a manual lens, and using the Focus Stick to Focus Check, is a good strategy. If you do like to use MF Assist, you’ll need to set the camera to Manual Focus Mode, which is found in the AF-MF Menu.

You can program one of the buttons on the camera body or one of the touch-screen gestures as a shortcut to activate the Focus Mode menu. I chose the AEL-AFL button on the back, and that works well for me, but it might not work for you. The unmarked Function (Fn) button on the top is another good option. This is not an ideal solution, but it’s better than digging through the menu. Since most of the time I’m using AF-S, it’s only occasionally that I need to change the Focus Mode to AF-C or MF, so it’s not a huge deal, but it would have been better if Fujifilm had kept the M/C/S switch on the camera body.

The X-E line has never had an ISO dial on the camera body. You’ve always had to dig through the menu to find the ISO menu. I had hoped that Fujifilm would add an ISO dial around the Shutter knob like the X100V, but they didn’t. My solution to this lack of an ISO dial is simple: the front wheel, which is called The Command Dial. The little wheel on the front can be programmed for only a few different things, like aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. A long press will allow you to switch what it controls, but I have it set to, and I leave it set to, ISO. Because I most often use Auto ISO, which can be programmed with each Custom Preset, I don’t change ISO often, but when I do this works very well, probably better than a dial around the Shutter knob.

The Fujifilm X-E4 is a great minimalistic camera, and I really appreciate that aspect of it, but the exclusion of the M/C/S switch went just a little too far, in my opinion. But that doesn’t mean the camera isn’t a great tool or that it can’t be worked around. I found that it has a sufficient number of buttons, and the firmware Fujifilm gave it does make up for some of the exclusions. Changing focus modes is more cumbersome than it should be, but it’s not a big problem, just an occasional minor inconvenience.

If you have a Fujifilm X-E4, I hope that you found this article helpful. If you’ve found a different solution to either the missing focus mode selector switch or the non-existent ISO dial, I’d love to hear about it in the comments! I’m fairly satisfied with my focus switch and ISO dial exclusion solution, but maybe you’ve figured out something even better.

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Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: LomoChrome Metropolis

Stop No. 11 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T4 – “LomoChrome Metropolis”

I’ve had many requests to create a LomoChrome Metropolis recipe, but it was impossible until Fujifilm created the new Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulation and new Auto White Priority white balance. LomoChrome Metropolis film, which is a Lomography product, has only been around for a couple of years. The film is high-contrast, with low-saturation and a warm cast. It has a cool retro-feel despite being new.

There’s a special quality to this LomoChrome Metropolis recipe. It’s almost a color version of black-and-white photography. In the right situations it creates a wonderful look that’s easy to love. It often mimics the film pretty faithfully. I’m very happy with how this one turned out, and I used it recently on a trip to Arizona.

This LomoChrome Metropolis recipe has been on the Fuji X Weekly app as a Patron Early-Access recipe since December 1st when the app launched. All of the Patron Early-Access recipes will eventually be made available to everyone as they’re replaced with new ones, which means that there’s a new recipe for Fuji X Weekly Patrons on the app right now, so if you’re a Patron, go check it out. This LomoChrome Metropolis recipe has been unlocked, so everyone now has access to it.

Dark Blossoms – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “LomoChrome Metropolis”

Because this recipe requires Eterna Bleach Bypass, Auto White Priority and a .5 adjustment, it’s only compatible with the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10, and X-E4 cameras. Unfortunately, all of the other X-Trans IV cameras (as of this writing) don’t have the required JPEG options, so it’s not compatible with other cameras. If you have an X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4, you might really appreciate this new film simulation recipe!

Eterna Bleach Bypass
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +2.5
Color: -2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -1
Clarity: +4
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Auto White Priority, +1 Red & -7 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this LomoChrome Metropolis film simulation recipe:

Artful Girl – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T4
National Geographic Bag – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Bouquet of Fake Flowers – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Blossoming Red – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Tropical Bloom – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Red Winter Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T4
Dirt Desert Drive – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Sunlight Through a Dormant Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T4
Backlit Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T4
Suburban Triangles – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T4
Yellow Blossom Sky – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Hanging Light Bulb – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

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Two Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipes: Kodachrome II

Mountain Suburbs – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodachrome II”

One of the more popular film simulation recipes that I’ve created is Kodachrome II, which was made for X-Trans III sensor cameras. While you can use that recipe on X-Trans IV cameras, the newer models have some JPEG options that the older ones don’t, so it can be fun to utilize those options to produce a different and hopefully better version of an old recipe. In this case, I have two new versions of Kodachrome II for X-Trans IV cameras.

Kodak introduced Kodachrome in 1935, and in 1961 they replaced the original film with a new and improved version called Kodachrome II and a higher-ISO sibling called Kodachrome-X. These films had more accurate color, finer grain and faster ISOs (ISO 25 and 64, respectively, compared to ISO 10) than the previous version. It was a big leap forward for color photography, and so it is no surprise that the innovators of color photography in the 1960’s and 1970’s relied heavily on it. It’s also the version that Paul Simon sang, “They give us the greens of summer, makes you think all the world’s a sunny day.”

Kodachrome II and Kodachrome-X produced a very similar look to each other. The main differences were in grain, contrast and saturation, but overall the variations were quite minor. Kodachrome-X was slightly more bold while Kodachrome II was slightly more clean. Even so, comparing slides, it’s tough to distinguish one from the other (conveniently, I have my grandparents old slides at my home). Even though I have named these two film simulation recipes “Kodachrome II” I think they more closely resembles Kodachrome-X film, but I find them to be a reasonable facsimile for both.

Yellow Arrow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Kodachrome II v2”

Because of the toxic chemicals used in the development of this era of Kodachrome, plus the complexity of the process, Kodak changed from K-12 development to K-14 development, which ushered in new Kodachrome in 1974, called Kodachrome 25 and Kodachrome 64. This version of the film is the one that I have personally used. Interestingly enough, even though this version wasn’t all that much aesthetically different than the previous, there was a big outcry among photographers, and a large group who used Kodachrome II and Kodachrome-X did not appreciate the change.

While I created the X-Trans III Kodachrome II recipe, it was Thomas Schwab who modified it for X-Trans IV. His version, entitled Kodachrome II, is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4. In some of my example pictures below I used a Tiffen 1/4 Black Pro-Mist diffusion filter with my X100V. Why? Because I haven’t used this filter in awhile and wanted to. I don’t think it adds anything essential to the recipe. In fact, you might prefer the results without the filter. Thank you, Thomas, for creating and sharing this update to the original recipe!

I made a slightly modified version, entitled Kodachrome II v2, which is compatible with the X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4. I used this recipe on my X-E4 (without any diffusion filter). This isn’t intended to be a “better” recipe, just a slightly different version using the new JPEG options found in my X-E4. Both of these film simulation recipes can be found in the Fuji X Weekly app!

Kodachrome II

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +2
Color: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +1
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Auto, +3 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this new Kodachrome II film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Rooflines – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Backyard Play Kitchen – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Playing Backyard Kitchen – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Hover Scooter – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Chair by a Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Jo in Evening Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Brothers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Easter Egg Basket – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Jon with Walkie Talkie – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fake Plants on a Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Kodachrome II v2

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +1.5
Color: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +1
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Auto White Priority, +3 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this new Kodachrome II v2 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Table Between Chairs – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Brothers Playing Together – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Fenced Horse – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Bicycle Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Stop the Storm – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Grabber – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Handle – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Hand Spade – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Jo Holding a Toy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Jo & Josh Playing – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

See also: X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipes

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Fujifilm X-T1 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: Jon’s Classic Chrome

Fujifilm X-T1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Jonathan Roesch – “Jon’s Classic Chrome”

I handed my Fujifilm X-T1 to my 11-year-old son, Jonathan—gave him a brief tutorial on how to use the camera, and let him have at it. My XF10 Classic Chrome film simulation recipe was programmed into the X-T1; to my surprise, Jon made a few small adjustments to it. He increased Dynamic Range to DR400, moved the White Balance Shift to +4 Red, and set Sharpness at 0. I’m not sure why he made those specific changes, but the results are pretty good, and I’m very proud and impressed by the pictures that he captured with the X-T1 using his settings!

My opinion is that this recipe has a ColorPlus feel to it. It could be close to Kodacolor, Portra 400, or Ultramax—it definitely has a Kodak color negative vibe; however, I think Fujicolor C200 might also be in the neighborhood. Whatever film it might be close to, it’s got a great analog-like aesthetic that’s easy to love. Great job, Jon!

Fujifilm X-T1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Jonathan Roesch – “Jon’s Classic Chrome”

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1 (Medium-High)
Shadow: +2 (High)
Color: +1 (Medium-High)
Sharpness: 0 (Medium)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Auto, +4 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 3200

Exposure Compensation: +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured by Jon on my Fujifilm X-T1 using his Classic Chrome film simulation recipe:

Fujifilm X-T1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fujifilm X-T1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fujifilm X-T1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fujifilm X-T1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fujifilm X-T1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fujifilm X-T1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fujifilm X-T1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fujifilm X-T1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fujifilm X-T1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fujifilm X-T1 – Farmington, UT – Photo by Jonathan Roesch

See also: X-Trans II Film Simulation Recipes

Find Jon’s Classic Chrome film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly app!

Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Classic Monochrome

Signs, Poles & Wires – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Classic Monochrome”

For some reason, black-and-white film simulation recipes aren’t as popular as color, but Fujifilm cameras are capable of some great monochrome images straight-out-of-camera. This new “Classic Monochrome” recipe was made by Thomas Schwab (B&W Instagram), who has created several of the film simulation recipes on this website and collaborated on several others. He’s a friend of this blog, and I’m honored that he allows me to share his recipes here!

Thomas said that he started with one of the Ilford recipes, and this evolved from that. It’s called “Classic Monochrome” because it has a great old-school B&W print feel. The only change that I added was Toning, which is optional, but it seems to look nice with these settings. This recipe has quickly become one of my favorite black-and-white options! It’s most similar to Dramatic Monochrome, so if you like that recipe you’ll like this one, too. Thank you, Thomas!

Suburban Garages – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Classic Monochrome”

This recipe is contrasty and clean. It reminds me of Agfapan 25 printed using a high-contrast filter (maybe a #4, or even split-filtered). It’s not intended to look like it, but that’s what it reminds me of. It does have a limited dynamic range, and it’s easy to clip highlights, so the exposure should be carefully considered, or perhaps try DR-Auto if you are concerned. It’s compatible (as of this writing) with the Fujifilm X100V, X-T4, X-Pro3 and X-S10 cameras.

Monochrome (+Y, +R, +G)
Dynamic Range: DR100
Highlight: +4
Shadow: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +1
Clarity: +4
Toning: WC +1, MG 0

Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Auto, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 12800
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Classic Monochrome film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Marks the Spot – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Main Line Trail – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Empty Box – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Empty Bench – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Joshua Biking – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Girl & Bike – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Horses & Ducks – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Country Road Bus – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
No Motor Vehicles – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Weed 1 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Weed 2 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Ice Abstract 1 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Ice Abstract 2 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
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Recipe Custom Name Format

An issue that many people have found with the different film simulation recipes is knowing what to adjust the White Balance Shift to, as well as knowing what the exposure compensation should be, when changing recipes. Only the newest Fujifilm cameras (the X-Pro3 and newer) have the ability to save the WB Shift with the custom presets; unfortunately, most Fujifilm cameras cannot save WB Shift with custom presets, and that’s a problem when switching between different recipes. Since the camera can’t save certain settings, people have come up with different solutions to help remember what those settings should be. One of those solutions is to put the WB Shift into the custom preset name. Not all Fujifilm cameras have the ability to name the custom settings, but many of them do.

Fuji X Weekly reader Randy Kirk took this name solution to a new level! He designed an abbreviation format for recipe names as a solution to the problem, which he explains below.

“The format translates, from left to right, as follows:
Film Recipe Name, WB mode (auto, daylight, etc), WB Offset, exposure compensation, and finally ISO or misc notes.”

“I use these abbreviations for White Balance:
AU: Auto
TN: Tungsten
C1: Custom 1, etc
F1: Fluorescent 1
KV: Kelvin
CL: Cloud
… and so on. Most can also be abbreviated to one letter if I run out of space to type.”

Below are some examples.

Kodachrome 64 is named: K64 DY+2r-5b +2/3~ 
Translation: “Kodachrome 64, Daylight White Balance with a +2 Red & -5 Blue shift, exposure comp +2/3, plus or minus 1/3 of a stop. The squiggle after the fraction translates to ‘more or less’ and takes less space than typing the full range listed in the recipe.”

Portra 160 is named: P160 DY~+4r-5b +1~
Translation: “Here, the squiggle after DY lets me know I can mess around with the White Balance, and the exposure compensation translates to +2/3 to +1 1/3 stop.”

Tri-X 400 is named: TriX C1+9r-9B +2/3~ 1600+
Translation: “White balance is Custom 1, exposure compensation is +1/3 to +1 stop, and ISO 1600 and up is recommended.”

“Last, here’s one that condenses my cheat notes for two recipes into one preset name:
K2/E100 A+3r-4b +1/3+ C/V
It looks funky, but translates to:
Kodachrome II / Ektachrome 100SW, Auto WB (abbreviated to A), WB Shift, Exposure Comp +1/3 to +2/3 stop.. and the last note indicates Classic Chrome (for Kodachrome II) or Velvia (for E100SW).” 

“A plus sign *after* the exposure compensation indicates another 1/3 stop ‘up’ (for a range of +1/3 to +2/3). Or if a recipe calls for an exposure range of minus 1/3 to minus 2/3 stop, then it would simply read ‘-1/3-‘.”

If you are having trouble remembering what adjustments that you need to make to your camera when you switch between recipes, this system of abbreviations with your custom recipe names might be just what you need. I know that this will be helpful to many of you. Thank you, Randy Kirk, for designing these abbreviations and sharing them!

Film Simulation Recipe Cards, Part 2!

Part 1

Oleksii Prytuhin has done it again! He created 9 more Film Simulation Recipe Cards to add to your collection!

I cannot tell you just how incredibly popular these are! The first 12 Film Simulation Recipe Cards that Oleksii created have been downloaded over 20,000 times! Even Fujirumors shared it. It’s such a great idea! People are really loving the cards!

These are credit-card-sized cards with Oleskii’s favorite film simulation recipes printed on them. They can be kept in a wallet for quick and easy reference. He printed them 86x54mm on thick paper with matte lamination. Feel free to download them and print them yourself, or save it to your phone.

The nine film simulation recipes that are on these cards are: Velvia, PRO Neg. Hi, Fujicolor Pro 400H, Kodak Tri-X Push Process, Kodak Ektachrome 100SW, Kodak Ultramax, Kodak Ektar 100, Classic Chrome, and… Luis Costa’s X-Trans III Classic Chrome recipe that Oleksii slightly modified to his own liking. Try it out! These are all X-Trans III recipes, but they’re also compatible with X-Trans IV cameras.

Oleksii gave me permission to share the PDF with you. If you’re interested in printing these cards for yourself, click the download button below (it will open up the file, which you can download), and print them! There’s also a Word document that contains the individual JPEGs, if that works better for you. I want to give Oleksii a big “thank you” for creating these and sharing them, and I invite you to give him a thank you in the comments if you download them. I appreciate it, and I know the whole Fujifilm community appreciates it!

Fujifilm X-M1 (X-Trans I) Film Simulation Recipe: Vivid Color

Vibrant Autumn – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Vivid Color”

The Fujifilm X-M1 doesn’t have nearly as many JPEG options as newer X-Series cameras have; however, that doesn’t mean that this camera can’t produce great-looking images straight-out-of-camera. This film simulation recipe is proof of that, as it simply looks great!

Many of you don’t have X-Trans I cameras, since there were only three models made: the X-M1, X-E1 and X-Pro1. Fujifilm quickly moved on to the X-Trans II sensor. I know that some of you still have your old X-Trans I camera, or have purchased one second-hand for cheap. For a long time I neglected creating recipes for these cameras, but no more! This is the second one for X-Trans I, and expect several more to be published in the coming months.

Fall Forest – Flathead Lake, MT – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Vivid Color”

Even though this film simulation recipe is intended for the X-M1, X-E1 and X-Pro1, if you have an X-Trans II or Bayer model, feel free to try this recipe on your camera. It won’t be exactly the same, but it will produce very similar results.

Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Shadow: +2 (Hard)
Color: +2 (High)
Sharpness: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Fluorescent 1 (“Daylight Fluorescent”), -5 Red & +5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs made using this Vivid Color film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-M1:

Stinker – Idaho Falls, ID – Fujifilm X-M1
Leave the Light On – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Sunlight Through the Curtain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Business Hours – Idaho Falls, ID – Fujifilm X-M1
Thrifty Nickel – Idaho Falls, ID – Fujifilm X-M1
Clothes Hangers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
H&M – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Autumn Forest Sunlight – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Bright Autumn Leaves – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Red Berries & Orange Leaves – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Early Autumn Leaves – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
October Leaves – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Leaves in a Dark Forest – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Lit Autumn Leaves – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Slowly Dying – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-M1
Autumn Leaves & Green Weed – Missoula, MT – Fujifilm X-M1
Misty Mountain Morning – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-M1

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

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Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: CineStill 800T

Suburban Night – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

I created my original CineStill 800T film simulation recipe about two-and-a-half years ago. That recipe has remained quite popular. It’s received a lot of positive feedback and I remain quite proud of it. That recipe was created for X-Trans III cameras, but newer models have more JPEG options. I’ve been asked a few times if that recipe can be improved using the new features that weren’t around when I created it.

This new version is something that I’ve been working on for months and months. My CineTeal recipe is actually one of the failed attempts. I’ve been trying to achieve either an accurate CineStill 800T or Kodak Vision3 500T look straight-out-of-camera. These two films are actually the same film, but the CineStill version has the RemJet layer removed, which means that it is more prone to halation and can be processed in C-41 chemistry. Vision3 500T is meant to be developed using the ECN-2 process. With either CineStill 800T or Vision3 500T, how the film is shot, developed, and scanned and/or printed can significantly effect the aesthetic.

Lone Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “CineStill 800T”

I’m not 100% satisfied with this recipe. I think in some situations and in certain lighting, it looks pretty darn accurate to the film. In other situations and in other lighting, it’s a little off. There’s a lot of variation in how the film can look, and it’s just not possible to encapsulate it all in one recipe. In any event, if you are looking for a recipe that produces results similar to Tungsten film, this is one to consider. It is only compatible (as of this writing) with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4.

Eterna
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +2
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -3
Clarity: -5
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Fluorescent 3 (Cool White Fluorescent), -6 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this new CineStill 800T film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Garage Door Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Inside Looking Out – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fuel Stop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Quick Quack Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Old Navy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Brick at Night – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Empty Bench – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
40% Off – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Hi – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Navy Surplus Baskets – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Ghost Shoppers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Remodel – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Red Cotton – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Lit Corner – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Chillin’ in the Drive Thru – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Tree Leaves at Night – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Night Rose – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Hot Beans – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Kitchen Ornament – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Book Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
End Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Girl in Window Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Home Umbrella Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

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Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Nature Neon

Setting Sun Trees – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Nature Neon”

This film simulation recipe isn’t mine. It was created by Fuji X Weekly reader Immanuel Sander, who has actually posted several different recipes on his Instagram account (@captn.look). Thomas Schwab was the one who tipped me off to this. There are several really nice recipes that Immanuel has shared, but this one is my personal favorite. I asked him if I could share it with you on this website, and he graciously agreed. Immanuel calls this recipe Captn Look Nature Neon.

I’m not sure what film this might most closely resemble. It’s kind of similar to my Golden Negative recipe (although not exactly), which is kind of similar to FPP Retrochrome (expired high-speed Ektachrome). It’s also almost redscale-ish, a little more subtly than my Redscale recipe. Cross processed film can sometimes have a red/orange color cast, particularly (non-Velvia) Fujifilm transparencies, but I don’t think these settings are especially close to that. Even if this recipe doesn’t look exactly like any particular film, it nonetheless produce very interesting results.

The Road Less Traveled – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Nature Neon”

It’s called “Nature Neon” in part because it uses the Fluorescent 1 white balance, which is also called Daylight Fluorescent or Neon Light. It gives a look as if a red neon light is illuminating the scene. The change that I made to Immanuel’s recipe is that I set Sharpness to -2; he had it set to -4. Thomas prefers it set to 0. Really, whatever Sharpness you prefer to use from -4 to 0 is acceptable.

This film simulation recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4. This article is a bit unusual in that it features example photographs from three photographers: Immanuel Sanders, Thomas Schwab, and myself. You can see how three different photographers used these settings. I want to give a big thank-you to Immanuel for creating and sharing this recipe, and to Thomas for showing it to me. Thank you, guys! I encourage you to check out their Instagram pages to see more of their pictures.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +2
Color: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -2
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Fluorescent 1, +2 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Nature Neon film simulation recipe:

Immanuel Sanders

Photo by Immanuel Sander
Photo by Immanuel Sander
Photo by Immanuel Sander
Photo by Immanuel Sander
Photo by Immanuel Sander

Thomas Schwab

Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab
Photo by Thomas Schwab

Ritchie Roesch

Salt Lake from Ladyfinger Point – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Peeking Peak – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Rocks & Shrubs – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Bison in a Meadow – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Lava Sunset – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V

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Fujifilm X-T200 (Bayer) Film Simulation Recipe: Golden Negative

Hidden Church – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200 – “Golden Negative”

I got my hands on a Fujifilm X-T200! It’s not my camera, I’m just borrowing it for a few weeks. So far I’ve been more impressed with it than I thought I’d be. I’ll write more about all this later. What I want to share today is the very first film simulation recipe that I’ve created for the X-T200, called Golden Negative.

I can’t tell you how many requests I’ve had for recipes compatible with Fujifilm Bayer cameras, such as the X-T200, X-T100, X-A7, X-A5 and XF10, but it’s been a lot! Prior to this, I’d only made three film simulation recipes for these cameras, partly because you cannot save custom presets on these cameras like you can on X-Trans models. You more-or-less have to use one recipe for a period of time, and only switch occasionally. With this film simulation recipe, there are now four to choose from! X-Trans II recipes are compatible with these Bayer cameras, but they produce slightly different results. This recipe will work on X-Trans II, but it won’t look exactly the same. I tried this recipe on an X-Trans IV camera, and it looked noticeably different, but it didn’t look bad, so feel free to try this recipe any camera with the Classic Chrome film simulation; for best results, use it on a Fujifilm Bayer camera.

Early Autumn Evening – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200 – “Golden Negative”

What does this Golden Negative recipe look like? I’m reminded of prints from the 1980’s and 1990’s, maybe captured on Kodak Gold and printed on Kodak paper. It’s not really intended to resemble that, it’s just what this recipe reminds me of. It has a beautiful low-contrast, low-saturation, warm-cast that’s closer to Kodak color negative film, such as Gold or ColorPlus, than reversal film. I don’t think this recipe is exactly like any specific film, but it looks great nonetheless.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR-Auto
Highlight: +1
Shadow: -2
Color: -2
Noise Reduction: -2
Sharpening: 0
White Balance: Daylight, +4 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Golden Negative film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-T200:

XB – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Ogden or Bust – Woods Cross, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Rose Garden – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Shadows on a Leaf – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Ground Leaves – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Brown Leaf – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Autumn Trees Trunks – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Forest Sunstar – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Nature Above City – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Haze Over North Salt Lake – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Moonrise Over Mansions – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Yellow Balsomroot – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Blossomed Flower – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Faux Succulent on a Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Girl Playing Cards – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Happy Girl – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Joshua on the Playground – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Lit Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T200

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

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