Fujifilm X-T200 (Bayer) Film Simulation Recipe: Golden Negative

Hidden Church – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200 – “Golden Negative”

I got my hands on a Fujifilm X-T200! It’s not my camera, I’m just borrowing it for a few weeks. So far I’ve been more impressed with it than I thought I’d be. I’ll write more about all this later. What I want to share today is the very first film simulation recipe that I’ve created for the X-T200, called Golden Negative.

I can’t tell you how many requests I’ve had for recipes compatible with Fujifilm Bayer cameras, such as the X-T200, X-T100, X-A7, X-A5 and XF10, but it’s been a lot! Prior to this, I’d only made three film simulation recipes for these cameras, partly because you cannot save custom presets on these cameras like you can on X-Trans models. You more-or-less have to use one recipe for a period of time, and only switch occasionally. With this film simulation recipe, there are now four to choose from! X-Trans II recipes are compatible with these Bayer cameras, but they produce slightly different results. This recipe will work on X-Trans II, but it won’t look exactly the same. I tried this recipe on an X-Trans IV camera, and it looked noticeably different, but it didn’t look bad, so feel free to try this recipe any camera with the Classic Chrome film simulation; for best results, use it on a Fujifilm Bayer camera.

Early Autumn Evening – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200 – “Golden Negative”

What does this Golden Negative recipe look like? I’m reminded of prints from the 1980’s and 1990’s, maybe captured on Kodak Gold and printed on Kodak paper. It’s not really intended to resemble that, it’s just what this recipe reminds me of. It has a beautiful low-contrast, low-saturation, warm-cast that’s closer to Kodak color negative film, such as Gold or ColorPlus, than reversal film. I don’t think this recipe is exactly like any specific film, but it looks great nonetheless.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR-Auto
Highlight: +1
Shadow: -2
Color: -2
Noise Reduction: -2
Sharpening: 0
White Balance: Daylight, +4 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Golden Negative film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-T200:

XB – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Ogden or Bust – Woods Cross, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Rose Garden – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Shadows on a Leaf – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Ground Leaves – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Brown Leaf – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Autumn Trees Trunks – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Forest Sunstar – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Nature Above City – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Haze Over North Salt Lake – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Moonrise Over Mansions – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Yellow Balsomroot – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Blossomed Flower – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Faux Succulent on a Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Girl Playing Cards – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Happy Girl – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Joshua on the Playground – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T200
Lit Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T200

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T200 Amazon B&H

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

With Other Film Simulations: Kodachrome 64

Classic Chrome

Here’s a unique idea that was suggested to me: apply different film simulations to different recipes, just to see what you get. Actually, that’s how My Ektachrome 100SW recipe came to be: a Fuji X Weekly reader took my Kodachrome II recipe and replaced Classic Chrome with Velvia. I’m going to make a series out of this, which I’m calling With Other Film Simulations, and maybe something interesting will come out of it.

I’ll start with the Fujifilm X100V Kodachrome 64 film simulation recipe. The original picture (at the top of this post), which you might recognize from my Rover Mini YouTube video, was made using Classic Chrome, the film simulation that the Kodachrome 64 recipe requires. The idea here is to keep every setting the same except for the film simulation. In case you don’t remember, the settings are:

Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: 0
Shadow: 0
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +1
Clarity: +3
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Daylight, +2 Red & -5 Blue

Let’s look at the pictures:

Provia
Velvia
Astia
PRO Neg. Hi
PRO Neg. Std
Classic Negative
Acros
Monochrome
Sepia

The color images are surprisingly similar. Velvia stands out for being the most vibrant. PRO Neg. Std stands out for having the lowest contrast. Classic Negative stands out for its color shift. The original version, which uses Classic Chrome, is still my favorite, but it is interesting to see how the other film simulations affect the picture. The Monochrome film simulation with these settings might prove to be a good low-contrast black-and-white recipe, something I’ll have to take a closer look at.

I hope that you enjoyed this quick article! We’ll do some more of these in the coming weeks and months. Which film simulation did you find most interesting with the Kodachrome 64 settings? Let me know in the comments!

Fujifilm X100V Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Ultramax 400

50174810886_0124629e81_c

Empty Outdoor Seating – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Ultramax 400”

Ultramax 400 is Kodak’s consumer grade ISO 400 color negative film. Kodak has sold Ultramax 400 under many different names, beginning in 1987 with Kodacolor VR-G 400, rebranded Gold 400 one year later, called simply GC at one point, and finally, in 1997, Kodak settled on Ultramax 400. Kodak still sells Ultramax 400, although it’s not the same film as Kodacolor VR-G 400. This film has been tweaked and updated at least nine times over the years; however, the overall aesthetic is still substantially similar between all variations.

This recipe is a happy accident. I was actually working on a different Kodak film simulation recipe, and this was a failed attempt. But I liked how this one looked, so I made a minor adjustment, and created this recipe, which I determined looked a heck-of-a-lot like Ultramax 400. I didn’t intentionally create an Ultramax 400 recipe, but nonetheless here it is! Sometimes it’s better to be lucky than good.

50200245208_d78ebfb3c4_c

Colorful Store Decor – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Ultramax 400”

For some of you this new recipe will be an instant favorite. I really love how it looks and plan to use it frequently. This one might be right up there with Kodachrome 64 and Portra 400 for favorite Kodak presets. A word of caution: it does require Clarity, which slows down the camera considerably. This film simulation recipe (as of this writing) is only compatible with the Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4 cameras.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR-Auto
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +1
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: 0
Clarity: +3
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: Auto, +1 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this new Kodak Ultramax 400 film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

50178962181_da32606fab_c

Road Construction – Clearfield, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50178327343_0ac683488a_c

Store Closing – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50175068762_488e04a441_c

Urban Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50186500091_d71ac4d89d_c

Summer Fruit Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50186500256_e7d9cafc5d_c

Ripening Peaches – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50201065162_652937ce49_c

Wood Barrel – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50174810781_941e788494_c-1

Table & Chair – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50174272903_8148e89df8_c

Library Lights – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50174272833_412c04112c_c

Contemplation – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50186753377_66e82229c5_c

Blackberry Boy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50186500246_317a74d048_c

End Table Succulent – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50186555573_f3855e1f02_c-1

Math Books on a Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50202588233_e9759a3c0e_c

Kitchen Tools – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50200787276_d1efd98ae7_c

Quality Goods – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50200788091_501ee832c8_c

75 – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50200245203_b57a1d0732_c

Table Bloom – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50200787921_cd3d64a367_c

Fake Tulips – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X100V

50178423693_30aafce99f_c

Fake Flowers in Window Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Film Simulation Recipe Compatibility: X-Trans IV

Bayer, X-Trans I & II
X-Trans III

Those with Fujifilm X-Trans IV cameras, which include the X-T3, X-T30, X-Pro3, X100V and X-T4, have the most film simulation recipes to choose from. There are currently five X-Trans IV cameras, and they actually fall into two groups: “Old” (X-T3 & X-T30) and “New” (X100V, X-Pro3 & X-T4). The two groups have different options. The latter has the new Classic Negative film simulation (also the new Bleach Bypass film simulation on the X-T4), Color Chrome Effect Blue, Clarity, new Grain options, and new B&W Toning. This means that the recipes that are intended for the X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4 are not compatible with the X-T3 and X-T30, with the exception of Kodak Tri-X 400, Kodak T-Max 400, and Verano Tostado, which are compatible with X-Trans III & IV (just follow the directions explained in those recipes). I do hope that Fujifilm adds these new features to the X-T3 and X-T30 via firmware updates.

X-T3 & X-T30

46744745254_ec8e609544_c

The list below are the film simulation recipes that are intended for use on the X-T3 and X-T30. Also, all of the X-Trans III recipes are also fully compatible with these two cameras, so you have that list to choose from, too.

Kodachrome 64
Kodak Gold 200
Kodak Portra 160
Kodak Portra 400
Kodak Ultramax
Kodak Vision3 250D
Eterna
Expired Eterna
Eterna Low-Contrast
Polaroid
Polaroid II
Analog Color
Jeff Davenport Night
Faded Color
Vintage Color Fade
Elite Chrome 200 Color Fade
Color Negative
Fujichrome Sensia 100
Fujicolor Pro 400H Overexposed
Warm Contrast
Bleach Bypass
Kodacolor
Kodacolor II 126
Classic Slide
Urban Vintage Chrome
Fujicolor 100 Industrial
Lomography Color 100
Velvia
Redscale
Cross Process
Acros
Monochrome Kodachrome
Ilford HP5 Plus Push-Process
Ilford Delta Push-Process
Dramatic Monochrome
Faded Monochrome
Split-Toned B&W
Cyanotype
Sepia

If you have an X-Trans III camera, you can use some of the recipes above, even though they are intended for X-Trans IV. Those recipes that use the Eterna film simulation are only compatible with the X-H1, because that’s the only X-Trans III camera with Eterna. Those that call for Color Chrome Effect or B&W toning are not fully compatible with X-Trans III (but some can be used anyway, it will just look a little different). Others, such as Portra 160 and Warm Contrast, are actually full compatible with X-Trans III, because Color Chrome Effect is Off.

X100V, X-Pro3 & X-T4

49901968537_6fb5c9b2fd_c

The film simulation recipes below are only compatible with the X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4, with the exception of Kodak Tri-X 400, Kodak T-Max 400, and Verano Tostado (just follow the instructions in that article). Expect this list to grow significantly over the coming weeks and months, as I have a number of different recipes in the works.

Kodachrome 64
Kodachrome 1
Kodak Portra 400
Kodak Ultramax 400
Kodak Ektar 100
Fujicolor Reala 100
Fujicolor Superia 100
Fujicolor Superia 800
Fujicolor Superia 1600
Classic Negative
The Rockwell
Bleach Bypass
Verano Tostado
Bright Summer
Cine Teal
Kodak Tri-X 400
Kodak T-Max 400
Black & White Infrared
Sepia

All of the X-Trans III and “Old” (X-T3 & X-T30) X-Trans IV recipes are fully compatible with the X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4, but with two caveats: Grain and B&W Toning. You’ll have to decide if you want Grain set to Small or Large. That will be your call, whatever you think is most appropriate for your pictures. If the recipe calls for B&W Toning, you’ll have to figure out how the new B&W Toning translates, because it’s different. Other than that, all of those recipes are yours to use, in addition to the ones listed above.

Now it’s your turn! Which recipes are your favorite and what cameras are you using them on? Let me know in the comments!

Film Simulation Recipe Compatibility: Bayer, X-Trans I & II

35191776924_3a26d8eecc_k

Fuji X Weekly reader Gustavo Potenza sifted through all of the film simulation recipes on this website and organized them by sensor and camera compatibility. Whoa! That was a tall task, but he knocked it out in a matter of minutes. I wanted to share this information with you, but also separate it into multiple posts so that you can quickly find the recipes you’re looking for. I’ll link this article to the recipe page for easy access, and I’ll keep it updated as I make new recipes. Thank you, Gustavo, for doing the hard work on this!

The first list, which are recipes compatible with Fujifilm Bayer and X-Trans I sensors, is very short. I really need to make it longer by adding more recipes. I hope to do that eventually. If you have a Fujifilm camera with a Bayer sensor or X-Trans I sensor, these are the recipes that you can use. The Classic Chrome recipe is only compatible with those cameras that have the Classic Chrome film simulation. At the bottom is the X-Trans II list, which is much longer.

Bayer & X-Trans I

29205831118_e596bc81da_h

Velvia, Classic Chrome, & Monochrome
Golden Negative
Analog Cool

Sepia

The above recipes are intended for the Fujifilm X-A1, X-A2, X-A3, X-A5, X-A7, X-A10, XF10, X-T100, X-T200, X100, X100S, X-PRO1, X-E1, and X-M1 (I hope I didn’t miss any). Some of the X-Trans II recipes below might also work on your Bayer or X-Trans I camera, although results might vary slightly, and it will depend if your camera has the film simulation that the recipe requires.

X-Trans II

49353781021_a354ef72d4_c

The film simulation recipes below are compatible with X-Trans II cameras. A few X-Trans II cameras don’t have all of the different film simulations required, so some of these recipes might not work on your camera.

Kodachrome 64
Kodachrome II
Ektachrome 100SW
Portra 160
Kodacolor
Eterna
Agfa Optima
Velvia, Classic Chrome & Monochrome
Faded Monochrome
Sepia
Lomography Color 100
Cross Process
Kodachrome Without Classic Chrome
Astia

The above recipes are intended for the Fujifilm X100T, X-E2, X-E2S, X-T1, X-T10, X70, X20, X30, XQ1, and XQ2 (I hope that I didn’t miss any). Not all of the recipes will be compatible with every X-Trans II camera. Some of them might even be compatible with Bayer and X-Trans I cameras with varying results, so feel free to try.

X-Trans III
X-Trans IV

Fujifilm XQ1 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: Kodachrome Without Classic Chrome

50171408716_2379549230_c

Red Greens – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm XQ1 – “Kodachrome”

I’ve made a lot of Kodachrome film simulation recipes for Fujifilm cameras (click here, here, here, here, here and here), and they’re very popular. Kodachrome was an iconic slide film made by Kodak for many, many years, so it’s no surprise that people want to get that look out of their Fujifilm camera. All of my Kodachrome recipes use Classic Chrome because it has a Kodak-esque slide film aesthetic, but some cameras don’t have Classic Chrome, such as the Fujifilm XQ1. Yes, the XQ1 is an X-Trans II camera, and most X-Trans II cameras have Classic Chrome, but this one doesn’t, only Provia, Velvia, and Astia for color images.

I created this recipe by capturing an image on my X-T1 using my Kodachrome 64 recipe for that camera, and then as best as possible recreated the look not using Classic Chrome. While I tried Velvia and Astia, I ended up using Provia. It’s a surprisingly close match, although not exact. I think you’ll like this Kodachrome recipe if your camera doesn’t have Classic Chrome.

50153404536_1a3b092a1f_c

!!! Ride !!! – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1 – “Kodachrome”

Provia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +2 (Hard)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Color: -2 (Low)
Sharpness: 0 (Standard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Daylight (Fujifilm calls it “Fine” for some reason), -1 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 1600
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs made using this “Kodachrome Without Classic Chrome” film simulation recipe on a Fujifilm XQ1:

50170859173_492c5125b3_c

Lights & Reflections – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50173970258_90273f086c_c

Flag Poles – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50170859198_5e88b7cfe8_c

Drive Thru Gas & Wash – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50171403816_67799c0c77_c

Flowers in a Pot on Concrete – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50152856003_058bb1229d_c

Horse Ranch – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50153404476_d523eb37b5_c

Closed Umbrella, Threatening Clouds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50144632548_bfe3258a85_c

Drawing Jonathan – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

50145177136_aca1e0829c_c

Breakfast – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm XQ1

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X100V New Feature: Color Chrome Effect Blue

49896039986_4e25d72713_c

The Fujifilm X100V, X-Pro3 and X-T4 have a new feature called Color Chrome Effect Blue. This is very similar to a different feature, which has a nearly identical name, that’s also found on X-Trans IV cameras, such as my X-T30, called Color Chrome Effect. What does Color Chrome Effect Blue do to photographs? How is it different than Color Chrome Effect? Those are questions that I hope to answer in this article.

The original Color Chrome Effect takes vibrant colors (mostly reds, but also yellows and greens to a lessor extent) and deepens their tones to retain color gradation. Fujifilm says that a short-lived color slide film called Fortia inspired this setting. Color Chrome Effect Blue is essentially the same, but for blue. It makes blues in the picture a deeper shade. It’s a lot like using a polarizing filter. You have three options: Off, Weak and Strong.

Let’s take a look at the pictures below:

50059924357_4fa2b60cf8_c

Color Chrome Effect Blue Off

50059690836_db322c060e_c

Color Chrome Effect Blue Weak

50059711361_bf24f836aa_c

Color Chrome Effect Blue Strong

50059135473_acea7c53c6_c

Color Chrome Effect Blue Strong & Color Chrome Effect Weak

50059711361_bf24f836aa_c-1

Color Chrome Effect Blue Strong & Color Chrome Effect Strong

Color Chrome Effect Blue noticeably darkens the blue sky. There’s a difference between Off and Weak and Strong that’s not too hard to spot. I added Color Chrome Effect to the bottom two images, and it doesn’t affect the sky—it barely affects the warm building; it’s so subtle that it’s hard to tell the difference even upon close inspection. I believe that Color Chrome Effect Blue makes more of a difference in an image than Color Chrome Effect, but they manipulate different colors, so they have different purposes. Disappointingly, Color Chrome Effect Blue doesn’t seem to change black-and-white images much at all.

For color images where you want blues to be rendered deeper, such as blue sky, Color Chrome Effect Blue is great! It’s like using a polarizing filter. If you want reds to be rendered deeper, use the original Color Chrome Effect. I hope this helps explain what the new Color Chrome Effect Blue feature is, how it’s different than Color Chrome Effect, and when to use it.

See also:
Clarity
B&W Toning
HDR

My Fujifilm X-T30 “Bleach Bypass” Film Simulation Recipe


49574693723_4aca2cc702_c

Instamatic Morning – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Bleach Bypass”

The upcoming Fujifilm X-T4 will have a new film simulation: Bleach Bypass. This new film simulation might eventually come to other X-Trans IV cameras, such as the X-T30, X-T3, X-Pro3 and X100V, but it might not, as Fujifilm has yet to add Classic Negative to the X-T3 and X-T30. It would certainly be nice if Fujifilm gave those of us with “older” X-Trans IV cameras the new film simulations. Even if they never do, you are in luck, as I have created a film simulation recipe to mimic the look of bleach bypass!

Bleach bypass is a darkroom technique where you skip or limit the bleach during development of color film, which causes it to retain the silver. Results will vary greatly depending on the film used and exactly how you develop it, but generally speaking what you get with bleach bypass is a high-contrast, low-saturation, grainy picture that appears as if a black-and-white and color picture were combined together. This technique is more common for motion picture film than still photography, but some people do bleach bypass with C-41 film.

I experimented with the techniques that I used for this film simulation back in June of last year. Much came out of those experiments, including both the Faded Color and Faded Monochrome film simulation recipes, as well as in-camera texturing. I created something similar to this recipe, but gave up on it before completing it. Last week Fuji X Weekly reader James Clinich reached out to me to share some experiments he had been doing, which turned out to be very similar to what I had done back in June. This rekindled my interest, and with inspiration drawn from James, I made this “Bleach Bypass” film simulation recipe.

49571405401_5260e2d929_c

Car’s 3 & 4 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Bleach Bypass”

This film simulation recipe requires the use of the double exposure feature of your camera. You will need a tripod, and there can’t be any movement in the scene. You have to make two identical exposures, one in color and one in black-and-white. After the first exposure is made, you must change the film simulation before making the second exposure. You can have both sets of settings programmed into the custom menu as separate presets, and toggle between them, or just change the film simulation, making sure that the tone is set correctly when making the Acros exposure. It’s a bit tricky and limited, but the results are nice. If you don’t want to do double exposures, but want something that will produce similar results to this recipe, try my Dramatic Classic Chrome recipe except set color to -4. That’s about as close as you can get. Otherwise, if you want to create a bleach bypass look in-camera, this recipe is your best option.

Exposure 1
Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +3
Shadow: +4
Color: +2
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Strong
Sharpening: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
White Balance: Auto, -1 Red & +3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Exposure 2
Acros
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +3
Shadow: +4
Tone: +2 (warm)
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Strong
Sharpening: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
White Balance: Auto, -1 Red & +3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Bleach Bypass” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

49563254822_2a3aa4f270_c

Pillows – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49563253407_33df3bb6f3_c

Window Robot – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49566795401_7fda9e267c_c

Illuminated Faux Flowers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49562528373_e875365df2_c

Pronto! – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49562529023_e9687a7b36_c

Touch of Green – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49566794776_c4a1b97e9f_c

Rooftops & Mountaintops – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49571404366_da4414a829_c

Tracks Under The Bridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49571631747_3683d6c970_c

Do Not Cross Tracks – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49571405386_ff5d7f1372_c

Locked Box & Escape Route – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49571652152_2812eac172_c

Empty Walking Bridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X-T1 (X-Trans II) Ektachrome 100SW Film Simulation Recipe


49540690163_2396eb784c_c

Windows & Reflections – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 “Ektachrome 100SW”

What I love about my Ektachrome 100SW film simulation recipe is that it reminds me of a film that I used to use. Just like the original Ektachrome 100SW recipe, which is compatible with X-Trans III & IV cameras, this recipe is identical to my Kodachrome II recipe, except that it uses Velvia instead of Classic Chrome. This version of Ektachrome 100SW is compatible with X-Trans I & II cameras, as well as Fujifilm Bayer cameras.

Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +2 (High)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-High)
Color: -1 (Medium-Low)
Sharpness: 0 (Medium)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Auto, +1 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 3200

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured on my Fujifilm X-T1 using this Ektachrome 100SW film simulation recipe:

49535392126_f7bd6d2a68_c

Instamatic – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49523150626_1c26e34b18_c

Throw Pillow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49535391971_5e4794d335_c

Striped Pillow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49513610448_133082aa17_c

Indoor Decor Near a Window – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49485898996_436425a91f_c

Grass & Concrete – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49535623947_41c74005fd_c

Little Steps – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49501742508_ef82284f05_c

February Forest – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49540671958_3a16960440_c

Lizard – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49541398337_861aa419ed_c

Penguins On A Rock – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49541398352_71ff660956_c

Swimming Penguins – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

49540671983_bea0249fc3_c

Coral Fish – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

My Fujifilm X-T30 Color Negative Film Simulation Recipe


48961963973_dffb2397ca_c

Evening Light On A Clearing Mountain – Riverdale, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Color Negative”

Silly Putty was invented by accident. There was a shortage of rubber during the second world war, and as a result several companies worked hard to create a synthetic substitute. What we now know as Silly Putty was a failed attempt at synthetic rubber. Even though it didn’t turn out exactly like its inventor had hoped, it still became a useful product that has brought joy to many people across the world. This “Color Negative” film simulation recipe has a similar story to Silly Putty (minus the war and rubber).

I’ve been working on a number of different recipes, trying to mimic several different aesthetics that I’ve been asked to create. One of the films that I’ve been trying to recreate the look of is Fujifilm C200, but I’ve yet to crack the code. This recipe is one of the failed attempts at C200. I like how it looks, so I thought I’d share it, even though it’s not exactly what I was trying for. I hope it become useful and brings joy to someone.

48962516186_17ac58aa5a_c

Cameras and Coffee – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Color Negative”

I named this recipe “Color Negative” only because it has a general color negative aesthetic, and I didn’t know what else to call it. It’s in the general neighborhood of Fujifilm C200, but it’s not exactly right for that film. Perhaps there’s some generic film that looks similar to this. It doesn’t precisely mimic any one film that I’m aware of, but this recipe does have a film-like quality to it.

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +2
Color: -2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: +1
Grain Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect: Off
White Balance: Daylight Fluorescent (1), -2 Red & +4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Note: There was some confusion on the white balance required for this recipe. It’s Fluorescent 1, also called Daylight Fluorescent or Neon 1. It’s the first option underneath Cloudy.

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using my Color Negative Film Simulation recipe on a Fujifilm X-T30:

48962447698_86cb0c1997_c

Fallen Leaves – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

48962699202_b8d5614318_c

Hanging Apple – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

48962516216_31228b6528_c

Leaf Hanging On – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

48962698712_f4ae76d0b1_c

Boy Unsure – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

48962516206_c4bec91576_c

Joy’s Smile – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

48961965163_d601507572_c

White Stars – Roy, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

48961963988_a9d22be9c7_c

White Cloud Ridge – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

48961964663_c1cb3a2665_c

Reserved Parking – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also: My Fujifilm Film Simulation Recipes

Fujifilm X100F Review Blog

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00