Fujifilm X-Trans I Film Simulation Recipe: Faux Classic Chrome

Bougainvillea Color – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Faux Classic Chrome”

A little over two years ago I figured out how to replicate default Classic Chrome using the PRO Neg. Std film simulation. I published my findings in a blog post, to hopefully be helpful to those with cameras which don’t have the Classic Chrome film simulations, such as the X-Pro1, X-E1, X100, and X100S. I didn’t make this an official Film Simulation Recipe because it was just emulating Classic Chrome without adjustments (other than Noise Reduction), which I didn’t think was especially exciting; however, I recently found out that this recipe is being used and there’s a desire for it to be included in the Fuji X Weekly App. I’m simply turning those two-year-old settings into an official Fuji X Weekly Film Simulation Recipe.

If you want a recipe that resembles Classic Chrome with DR100, Highlight 0, Shadow 0, Color 0, Sharpness 0, and AWB (without a shift), this recipe is a good facsimile of that. It’s not possible to 100% faithfully mimic Classic Chrome without Classic Chrome, but these settings are pretty close, and as close as you’re likely going to get.

Laughing at a Joke – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Faux Classic Chrome”

I created these settings on an X-Trans II camera, but all of these images were captured on my Fujifilm X-Pro1. If you have an X-Trans I or X-Trans II sensor that doesn’t have Classic Chrome but does have PRO Neg. Std, you can use this recipe to approximate default Classic Chrome. The results are pretty decent; it’s a solid all-around recipe that’s good for a variety of subjects and situations.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Color: +1 (Medium-High)
Sharpness: 0 (Standard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Auto, 0 Red & -1 Blue

ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Faux Classic Chrome” Film Simulation Recipe on a Fujifilm X-Pro1:

Midday Palm – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Building, Clouds – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Mostly Sunny Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Garden Trumpets – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Reaching Garden – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Pergola Roof Design – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Pop of Pink – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Hiding Blooms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Scraggly Bloom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Josh Looking at Something – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-Pro1

Find this film simulation recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Pure Negative

Gold Coast – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Pure Negative”

This “Pure Negative” Film Simulation Recipe was created by Thomas Schwab, who has made several recipes published on this website, including Superia Xtra 400Fujicolor NPS 160 Pulled, Urban Vintage ChromeKodachrome IIKodak Portra 800 v2Kodak Brilliance, Classic MonochromeB&W Superia, and Monochrome Kodachrome. Thomas has also collaborated on other recipes, playing an important role in getting them right, including Kodak Portra 800Kodak Ektar 100Kodachrome 1Kodak Portra 400, and Kodak T-Max 400. I’m sure I’ve missed a few, and for that I apologize.

Thomas told me that this “Pure Negative” recipe is basically a modification of his X-Trans I Kodachrome II recipe for use on X-Trans IV cameras. Because X-Trans I doesn’t have Classic Chrome, Thomas used the PRO Neg. Std film simulation to emulate a Kodachrome aesthetic as best as possible, and his recipe does a good job of that for the X-Pro1 and X-E1 cameras. There are already several excellent Kodachrome options for X-Trans IV; this recipe isn’t intended to replicate Kodachrome, but instead produce good natural-looking results—perhaps there is a little unintentional Kodachrome 25 resemblance, too. Thank you, Thomas, for creating this recipe and allowing me to share it on Fuji X Weekly!

Cactus Scar – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Pure Negative”

This Film Simulation Recipe is a great general-purpose option. It’s very versatile, delivering excellent results in a variety of situations. The only modification that I made to Thomas’ recipe is Dynamic Range: he prefers DR-Auto, but I set it to DR200. That’s not a big change, as DR-Auto chooses DR200 whenever there is bright highlights in the frame. Select whichever you prefer—either DR-Auto or DR200 is fine. For the Fujifilm X-T3 and X-T30 cameras, ignore Grain size and use a 5% CineBloom in lieu of Clarity (or just ignore Clarity)—the results will be similar. For X-Trans III, you’ll additionally have to ignore Color Chrome Effect, since your camera doesn’t have it. This recipe should be fully compatible with the new X-H2s, although I have not tested it to know for certain.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +2
Color: -4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: +1
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Auto, +1 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Pure Negative” Film Simulation Recipe on a Fujifilm X-E4:

Bougainvillea Branch – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
One Blossom Remains – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Prickly Pear – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Arching Palms – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Veiled Wasatch – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Pismo – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Brad’s – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Turbulent Waters – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Wave Rider – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Surfer – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Standing on Water – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Golden Ocean – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-E4 Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X-E4 Silver   Amazon   B&H

Find this film simulation recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Nostalgic Print

Empty Shell – Pasadena, CA – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Nostalgic Print”

My wife, Amanda, visited her mom, and when she returned home she had a 4″ x 6″ print. “I thought you’d find this interesting,” she said as she handed it to me. I looked at it carefully—front and back—then set out to recreate the look on my Fujifilm X-E4. I have no idea what film was used to capture the picture (other than it was a color negative film), but it was about 20-years-old (based on the subject), definitely from a cheap point-and-shoot of some sort (possibly a disposable camera), it was printed on Fujicolor paper at a one-hour lab, and was likely faded from improper storage. I only had one picture to go off of, but I feel I nailed the aesthetic of it pretty darn closely.

Perhaps more importantly, I really like the look of this recipe. It is the most nostalgic-analog-like results that I’ve ever achieved from the PRO Neg. Std film simulation. It reminds me a little of the Kodak High Definition Plus 200 recipe, but with less contrast and less saturation. I’ve enjoyed shooting with this one—it’s definitely not for everyone or every situation; however, some of you will really appreciate it in the “right” situations.

Palms & Pond – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Nostalgic Print”

This “Nostalgic Print” Film Simulation Recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. Those with newer GFX cameras can likely use it, too. For those with the X-T3 and X-T30 (or older GFX cameras), if you ignore Color Chrome FX Blue and Grain size (since your camera doesn’t have those), and replace Clarity with a diffusion filter (such as a 10% CineBloom), you can get pretty close to this look; for X-Trans III, you’ll have to additionally ignore Color Chrome Effect (since you don’t have it)—the results will be slightly more different, but still pretty similar overall.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: 0
Color: -4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -2
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Weak
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Weak
White Balance: 4700K, -3 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Nostalgic Print” Film Simulation Recipe on a Fujifilm X-E4:

Red Train – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Five Palms – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Eagle 5 – Ehrenberg, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Morning Mountain Palms – Riverside, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
76 Pretzel – Ehrenberg, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Palm Leaves – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Tropical Plant – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Ice Bloom – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Sam’s Market – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Green House – Redlands, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Cupboard & Curtain – Redlands, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
A Sub Above the Dumpster – Pasadena, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Three Bikes & Pedestrian – Pasadena, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Umbrellas Here – Pasadena, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Yield on Green – Pasadena, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Top Floor Tree – Redlands, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
The Kitchen – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Indoor Shrine – Redlands, CA – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this film simulation recipes and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-Trans I (X-E1 + X-Pro1) Film Simulation Recipe: Ektachrome

Diesel – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Ektachrome”

Ektachrome is a line of color transparency film introduced by Kodak in the 1940’s. I did some research, and counted 40 different emulsions over the years that carried the Ektachrome name! Generally speaking, Ektachrome was less warm than Kodachrome (although it depends on which Ektachrome you’re referring to), and also less archival. While Kodachrome was discontinued in 2009, Ektachrome can still be purchased today. I’m not certain which (of the 40) Ektachrome films this recipe most closely resembles. It has more of a general Ektachrome feel rather than being an exact copy of a specific emulsion.

This was a Patron Early-Access recipe, but has been replaced by another, so it is now available to everyone! If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, be sure to look for the recipe that replaced this one. This “Ektachrome” recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-E1 and X-Pro1 cameras. Unfortunately, even though the X-M1 is X-Trans I, this recipe is not compatible with that camera. I really like how this one looks, and I think some of you will really appreciate it, too!

Two Cans – Weber Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1

Pro Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Shadow: +2 (Hard)
Color: -1 (Medium-Low)
Sharpness: +2 (Hard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Daylight/Fine, -1 Red & +3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Ektachrome” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-Pro1:

House Flag – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Dead Wood – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Cattails – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Succulent Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Ektachrome”
Boy On Couch Watching TV – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Drinking Fountain – Weber Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Two Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Berries in a Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Blackberry Bush – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Francis Peak Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-T1 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: Scanned Negative

Mountain Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Scanned Negative”

I was playing around with white balance shift, and came across some settings that I thought looked interesting. I wasn’t attempting to mimic any specific film or process, but was simply experimenting with tints. I’m pretty well acquainted with white balance shift, but I was searching for inspiration—and I found it!

While this film simulation recipe wasn’t modeled after any specific film, what it reminded me of is an improperly color-corrected negative film scan. You see, color negative film is orange (because of the yellow and magenta masks), and when scanned and inverted into a positive image, it will have a green-cast that needs to be color corrected. Some scanners will do this automatically, and some will require manual adjustments. If not color corrected completely right, the picture can have a color cast that might seem a little off—in this case, slightly too green (depending on the light), but not by a lot (and not always). In any event, I think this recipe has a certain mood that’s definitely interesting in the right situations.

Sidewalk Bell – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Scanned Negative”

This “Scanned Negative” film simulation recipe is compatible with all X-Trans II cameras that have the PRO Neg. Std film simulation. The XQ1, XQ2, and X10 I believe don’t have this film simulation, so it’s not compatible with those cameras. If you have an X-Pro1 or X-E1, feel free to try this recipe, too, although the results will be slightly different.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -1 (Medium-Soft)
Shadow: 0 (Standard)
Color: -2 (Low)
Sharpness: 0 (Standard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: 5300K, -5 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 3200

Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured on my Fujifilm X-T1 using this “Scanned Negative” film simulation recipe:

Classic Adventures Parked – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Open Sign – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Yellow Poncho – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Icy Hose – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Reflected, Not Reflected – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Stairway to Nativity – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Post & Trashcan – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Ivy & Winter Home – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Snow On Green Bush – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Neighborhood in Winter Snow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

See also: Fujifilm X-Trans II Film Simulation Recipes
Find this film simulation recipe and over 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-Trans III + X-T3 & X-T30 Film Simulation Recipe: Porto 200

Yellow Bike – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Porto 200”

The name of this recipe is not a typo. Awhile back I was asked to make a film simulation recipe for Fujifilm X-Trans II cameras that mimic the aesthetic of photographer João Falcão. I was able to create an X-Trans II recipe that was fairly close, although perhaps not exact. Certainly if you like João’s aesthetic, you’ll appreciate those settings. I called that recipe Porto 200 because Porto is the city in Portugal where João is from. While Porto means “port” I think it has a nice film-stock-like name, similar to “Portra” for example. While there is no film called Porto 200, I decided to use the name anyway.

This Porto 200 recipe is an adaptation of the X-Trans II settings for X-Trans III, plus X-T3 and X-T30, cameras. It’s got a great Kodak-like print-film analog aesthetic. If you have a Fujifilm X-Trans III camera, or the X-T3 or X-T30, I invite you to give it a try. This recipe was one of the original Patron Early-Access recipes on the Fuji X Weekly App, but now it is available to everyone, since a different Early-Access recipe has replaced it—if you are a Patron, be sure to look for it on the App!

Winter Trees – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Porto 200”

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: -1
Shadow: 0
Color: 0
Color Chrome Effect: Off or N/A
Sharpness: 0
Noise Reduction: -4
Grain Effect: Weak
White Balance: Shade, 0 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Sample photographs, all camera-made JPEGs, captured with a Fujifilm X-T30 using this Porto 200 film simulation recipe:

Monumental – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Bike in Waiting – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Yellow Jacket – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Studio 10 – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Brick Reflections – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Opposite Directions – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Reflecting on Empty Spaces – Bountiful, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Windshield Bokeh – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Do Not McEnter – Roy, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Night Train – Clinton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Fujifilm X-Trans III + X-T30 & X-T3 Film Simulation Recipe: Eterna Bleach Bypass

Flowing Stream – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Eterna Bleach Bypass”

Lately I’ve been really enjoying the new Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulation found on the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. It occurred to me that those with “older” cameras, like X-Trans III and the X-T30 and X-T3, are missing out, so I wanted to do something about it. Now back in May I created a recipe for these cameras called Chrome Bypass that sort of fulfills this, but it wasn’t an attempt necessarily at mimicking the Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulation; however, I used it as a starting point for this recipe. After much adjusting and experimenting, I decided that this was the closest that I could get to Eterna Bleach Bypass for those without it.

The Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulation is intended to resemble cinematic film that’s had the bleach skipped during development. It has low-saturation and high-contrast, and almost a silvery aesthetic. This recipe isn’t a 100% match to the film simulation, but it’s as close as you’re likely to get. And it produces some really nice results—I very much enjoyed using it!

Sunset Snow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Eterna Bleach Bypass”

This recipe is intended for those who have a Fujifilm X-Pro2, X100F, X-E3, X-H1, X-T2, X-T20, X-T30, or X-T3 camera. If you have an X-Pro3 or X100V, you can use this recipe, too, but you’ll have to decide what Grain size you want (either Small or Large). Those with an X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, or X-T30 II can also use this recipe (after deciding on Grain size), but I would recommend the Ferrania Solaris FG 400, Muted Color, Silver Summer, or LomoChrome Metropolis recipes instead, which use the Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulation.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +3
Shadow: +3
Color: -4
Color Chrome Effect: Off or N/A
Sharpness: 0
Noise Reduction: -4
Grain Effect: Weak
White Balance: Incandescent, +8 Red & -9 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Sample photographs, all camera-made JPEGs, captured with a Fujifilm X-T30 using this “Eterna Bleach Bypass” film simulation recipe:

Warning Falling Bike – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Lost Mouse Hat – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
November Leaves – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Leaves Along the Autumn Path – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Path Covered in Autumn Leaves – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Fallen Tree Across the Gap – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Yellow Leaves in the Forest – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Red Leaves in the Forest – Fruit Heights, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Little Red Berries Dangling – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Last to Go – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Find this film simulation recipe and nearly 200 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-T1 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: CineStill 800T

Night Synergy – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “CineStill 800T”

This is my favorite CineStill 800T film simulation recipe. I created my first CineStill 800T recipe, which is intended for X-Trans III cameras, over three years ago. My next version, which is intended for newer X-Trans IV cameras, was published nearly a year ago. This X-Trans II recipe was one of the original Patron “Early-Access” recipes on the Fuji X Weekly App. In other words, those who are Patrons on the App have already had access to this recipe, and now that another recipe has replaced it, this CineStill 800T recipe is available to everyone! Early-Access to some new recipes is one of the benefits of being a Fuji X Weekly Patron, and a great way to support this website.

CineStill 800T is Kodak Vision3 500T motion picture film that’s been modified for use in 35mm film cameras and development using the C-41 process. Because it has the RemJet layer removed, it is more prone to halation. The “T” in the name means tungsten-balanced, which is a fancy way of saying that it is white-balanced for artificial light and not daylight. CineStill 800T has become a popular film for after-dark photography.

Pair – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “CineStill 800T”

Even though the film that this recipe is intended to mimic is Tungsten-balanced, it can still produce interesting pictures in daylight. It’s a versatile recipe, but it definitely delivers the best results in artificial light. When I photograph with my Fujifilm X-T1 after sunset, this is the recipe that I use.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +2 (Hard)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Color: -1 (Medium-Low)
Sharpness: 0 (Standard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: 4300K, -3 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 3200

Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured on my Fujifilm X-T1 using this CineStill 800T film simulation recipe:

Red Hatchback – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
We Care About Asada Nachos – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Shoe Repair in Disrepair – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Vending Machines – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Narrow Drive – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
2nd & Main – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
The Kaysville Theatre – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Park Gazebo – Clinton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Fall Branch – Clinton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Cut Off – Clinton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Find this film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-Trans I (X-Pro1 + X-E1) Film Simulation Recipe: Kodachrome II

Storm Building Over Mountain Ridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Kodachrome II”

Kodachrome is probably the most iconic photographic film ever made. It was legendary, and many people saw the world through its colors. Kodak produced Kodachrome film from 1935 through 2009, when it was suddenly discontinued.

The Kodachrome name has been used for many different films over the years. The first Kodachrome product was a two-glass-plate color negative that was introduced in 1915. Like all other color photography methods of its time, the results weren’t particularly good and the product not especially successful.

In 1935 Kodak released its next Kodachrome, which was a color transparency film with an ISO of 10. This Kodachrome was the first color film that produced reasonably accurate colors and was the first commercially successful color film. It became the standard film for color photography for a couple decades, and was even Ansel Adams’ preferred choice for color work. The December 1946 issue of Arizona Highways, which was the first all-color magazine in the world, featured Barry Goldwater’s Kodachrome images.

Kodak made significant improvements to Kodachrome, and in 1961 released Kodachrome II. This film boasted more accurate colors, sharper images, finer grain, and a faster ISO of 25. While it was still similar to the previous Kodachrome, it was better in pretty much every way. A year later Kodachrome-X was introduced, which had an ISO of 64.

Neighborhood Flag – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Kodachrome II”

Another generation of Kodachrome, which came out in 1974, saw Kodachrome II replaced by Kodachrome 25 and Kodachrome-X replaced by Kodachrome 64. The differences between this version and the previous weren’t huge and image quality was very similar. The biggest change was going from the K-12 to the K-14 development process (which was a little less toxic and complex, but still toxic and complex). This generation of Kodachrome is what most people think of when they picture (pun intended) the film, gracing the pages of magazines like National Geographic.

While I’ve published a number of recipes with the Kodachrome name, I’ve never made one for X-Trans I because Classic Chrome is necessary to replicate the look, and X-Trans I doesn’t have Classic Chrome. Well, Thomas Schwab got himself a Fujifilm X-E1, and he figured out a pretty phenomenal Kodachrome facsimile using PRO Neg. Std! Unbelievable! It’s amazing how good this recipe looks considering that it doesn’t use Classic Chrome. The X-M1 doesn’t have PRO Neg. Std, so this recipe isn’t compatible with that camera, but if you have an X-E1 or X-Pro1, this one is sure to become an instant favorite! Thank you, Thomas, for creating and sharing this recipe!

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1 (Medium-High)
Shadow: +2 (High)
Color: -2 (Low)
Sharpness: +2 (Hard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Auto, +1 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Kodachrome II” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-Pro1:

Cloud Building Behind Mountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Grass & Flowers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Berry Bush – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Reddish Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Sons for Mayor – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Top Stop – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Restroom Closed – Weber Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Interstate 84 West – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Power Stop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Five Buckets – Weber Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-Trans III + X-T30 & X-T3 Film Simulation Recipe: Chrome Bypass

Don’t Walk Under Falling Bicycles – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Chrome Bypass”

There are a number of X-Trans IV film simulation recipes that I’ve had multiple requests to create versions for that are compatible with X-Trans III and X-T3 and X-T30 cameras. LomoChrome Metropolis and Bleach Bypass are two that are commonly requested. These recipes require JPEG settings that don’t exist on the “older” cameras, including the Classic Negative or Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulations. I knew it would be impossible to recreate those recipes for X-Trans III and the X-T3 and X-T30 cameras, but I wanted to get as close as I could. After much experimenting, I came up with some settings that are sometimes similar to the LomoChrome Metropolis recipe and are sometimes similar to the Bleach Bypass recipe, and sometimes not like either.

What the LomoChrome Metropolis and the Bleach Bypass recipes have in common are that they’re both high in contrast and low in color saturation. There are some other similarities between them, but there’s plenty that’s different, too. This recipe with certain subjects and in certain light situations can resemble one or the other, or neither. It’s as close as I could get. If you like the LomoChrome Metropolis and Bleach Bypass recipes, this is your best bet for X-Trans III and X-T3 and X-T30 cameras (aside from doing double-exposures). While it’s not as “perfect” as I was hoping to achieve, I think it’s a pretty good recipe for capturing dramatic pictures. It’s kind of (but not really) the low saturation version of Dramatic Classic Chrome.

1100 Stop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Chrome Bypass”

Because these settings resemble both the LomoChrome Metropolis and the Bleach Bypass film simulation recipes, I decided to name this recipe Chrome Bypass, taking a little from each name. I don’t currently have access to an X-Trans III camera, so I don’t have any samples captured with a Fujifilm X-Trans III camera, but it should look very similar.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +3
Shadow: +4
Color: -4
Color Chrome Effect: Off or N/A
Sharpness: -1
Noise Reduction: -4
Grain Effect: Strong
White Balance: Auto, +2 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Sample photographs, all camera-made JPEGs, captured with a Fujifilm X-T30 using this “Chrome Bypass” film simulation recipe:

Mountain Teasels – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Cloudy Branches – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Summer Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Country Fence & Old Tires – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Tulip Pot – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Colorful Tulips – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Handy Dandy Grill – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Little Bit of Green – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Thrown Pillow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Instax Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fujifilm X-T1 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: Porto 200

Hidden House – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Porto 200”

I was asked to make a film simulation recipe for Fujifilm X-Trans II cameras that mimics the aesthetic of photographer João Falcão (Instagram). I got pretty close to his look with this recipe, although perhaps not exact. Certainly if you like João’s aesthetic, you’ll appreciate these settings. It produces some really nice results! I call it Porto 200.

Why do I call this film simulation recipe Porto 200? After all, there’s no film called Porto 200. Well, Porto is the city in Portugal where João is from. While Porto means “port” I think it has a nice film-stock-like name, similar to “Portra” for example. So Porto 200 it is!

Moody Lake – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Porto 200”

I really enjoy using this recipe on my X-T1! It has (at least for now) a permanent spot in the Q menu. It produces a look that might be kind of similar to ColorPlus 200. It’s not intended to be similar to that film, but to me it seems a little similar. Feel free to try it with +1 Color and/or Sharpness if you prefer, or -5 Blue if you think it’s too yellow. This recipe is intended for X-Trans II cameras, but it will work on X-Trans I and Bayer cameras, too, but with slightly different results.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0 (Std)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Color: 0 (Mid)
Sharpness: 0 (Std)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)

White Balance: Daylight/Fine, +2 Red & -6 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Porto 200 recipe on my Fujifilm X-T1:

Holiday Rain – Big Arm, MT – Fujifilm X-T1
Forest Ivy – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Fall Wall – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Forest Fence – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Dying Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Tree Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Hanging Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Little Red Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Red Berries in a Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Treescape – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

See also: X-Trans II Film Simulation Recipes

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Fujifilm X-T20 (X-Trans III) Film Simulation Recipe: Cine Teal

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Garden Flowers Bloomed – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 – “Cine Teal”

My Fujifilm X100V “Cine Teal” film simulation recipe has been a lot more popular than I expected it to be. It requires the Eterna film simulation, plus some other settings only found on the newest Fujifilm models. I’ve been asked by a few people to create a “Cine Teal” recipe for X-Trans III cameras, which don’t have that film simulation and those new options, so I did! This recipe woks best during the “Blue Hour” of dusk and dawn, in shade and on overcast days.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +3
Color: -3
Noise Reduction: -3
Sharpening: -1
Grain Effect: Weak
White Balance: 4500K, +2 Red & -8 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photos, all straight-out-of-camera JPEGs captured on a Fujifilm X-T20 using this “Cine Teal” Film Simulation recipe:

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Upside-Down Umbrella – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Green Tree & House – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Been Better – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Spring Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Tree Leaves Green – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Lavender Bloom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

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Pine & Rock – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

These settings also work on the Fujifilm X-T30 and X-T3, just set Color Chrome Effect to Off. I captured the photographs below on my X-T30 using this “Cine Teal” film simulation recipe:

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Hazy Light Through The Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Mountain Pines – Francis Peak, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Mountain Ridge – Francis Peak, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Mountain Radar – Francis Peak, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Dusting Snow & Clouds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Clouds Around The Mountains – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Spirit of Photography – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Stairs & Reflection – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Morning Light & Shadows – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Film – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-T1 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: “Eterna”

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Lavender – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Eterna”

I haven’t forgotten about my Fujifilm X-T1! My last five film simulation recipes have been for my new X100V, but I will continue making recipes for other sensors. Not everyone, probably not most Fujifilm X shooters, have the latest models, so the recipes for those cameras are irrelevant to many Fuji X Weekly readers. There will still be many articles related to the X100V, but I will continue to publish articles about other Fujifilm cameras, too. I’ll try to keep things balanced.

This “Eterna” film simulation recipe is my best facsimile of my X-T30 Eterna recipe. Obviously X-Trans II cameras don’t have the Eterna film simulation, as well as other options that the X-T30 has. It’s impossible to make an exact match, but this one is surprisingly pretty close. It looks nothing like straight-out-of-the-box Eterna, but it resembles pretty closely my Eterna recipe, which requires some big adjustments to various settings.

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Red Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Eterna”

My X-T1 “Eterna” recipe has a strong warm color cast, and it has a fair amount of contrast. It reminds me of Kodak Gold printed on Kodak paper, but I’m sure it’s not an exact match for that, just a general impression. This recipe is not for every situation, but it can look great for certain pictures.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR100
Highlight: +2 (High)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-High)
Color: +2 (High)
Sharpness: +1 (Medium-High)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: Auto, +6 Red & -7 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Eterna” recipe on my Fujifilm X-T1:

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Yellow Truck with Red Graffiti – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Empty Trailers – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Evening Thistle – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Someone’s Watching – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Authorized Persons and Vehicles Only – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Bike Lane Ends – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Stump by the Water – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Pole Reflection – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Sunstar Tree – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Empty Bench – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Ford 250 – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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SkyWest – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Statue Girl on Bench – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Shadow Stripes – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Toes & Couch – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Josh in the Window Light – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Kitchen Succulent – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Tree Branch Blossoms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Cloud Above The Mountain Ridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Mountain Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

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Tree Top – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

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Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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My Fujifilm X-T30 Analog Color Film Simulation Recipe


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Pentax – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Analog Color”

Sometimes accidents are happy, such as with this film simulation recipe, which I call Analog Color. I was attempting to make a recipe that mimics the looks of Kodak Portra 400 that’s been overexposed, but I was unsuccessful (at least for now); however, in the process I accidentally created this one. It was a mistake, but I liked how it looked, so I shot a bunch of pictures with it. This recipe reminds me of Fujicolor C200 or Agfa Vista 200, or perhaps even Kodak Gold 200. It’s in the neighborhood of ColorPlus 200, as well. But, it doesn’t exactly resemble any of those films perfectly. What I appreciate about this Analog Color film simulation is that it has a film-like quality to it, with a real color negative aesthetic, even if it’s not an exact match to any film that I’m aware of.

How this film simulation recipe looks depends on the light. This is true of all the recipes that don’t use auto white balance, but it seems especially so with this particular recipe. It can have a warm cast sometimes and cool cast other times, or even occasionally both a cool and warm cast within the same image. Perhaps this is one of the things that make it appear film-like. I do think that there’s something special about this recipe.

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Route Running – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Analog Color”

I like Color set to -1, but feel free to play around with that. If you want something more saturated, increase Color to 0 or +1. If you don’t like grain, set it to Weak or off. If you like lots of grain, keep the ISO high, perhaps no lower than ISO 1600. I think that this recipe will pair well with vintage lenses, and that’s something else you can experiment with.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +3
Shadow: +0
Color: -1
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Strong
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: 1
White Balance: Daylight, -3 Red & +1 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all straight-out-of-camera JPEGs captured using my Fujifilm X-T30 Analog Color film simulation recipe:

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Red Window – Monument Valley, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30

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Cut Strawberries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Joshua Smiling – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Girl in a Blue Sweater – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Living Room Bass Pro – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Backlit Jon – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Succulent on a Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Time’s Fun When You’re Having Flies – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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46 Minutes to Ogden – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Empty Seats – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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The Bags We Carry – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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No Storage – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Rain God Mesa – Monument Valley, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30

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Tree In The Dirt – Monument Valley, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30

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Monument Valley Afternoon – Monument Valley, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30

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Monument Valley After Sunset – Monument Valley, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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[Not] My Fujifilm X-T30 “Warm Contrast” Film Simulation Recipe


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Flower Pots – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Warm Contrast”

Fuji X Weekly reader Manuel Sechi recently contacted me regarding some camera settings that he was working on. He was trying to replicate the look of the “Warm Contrast” preset in Lightroom. He felt that he was close but was hoping that I might help refine the settings to get a little closer. He showed me some of his pictures where he had applied the preset, which was helpful as I don’t use Lightroom. I tried out his settings and indeed they looked very close to the photographs that he shared. I made some small adjustments to refine it to what I thought might be a closer match to the preset, although not having the preset at my disposable was admittedly a challenge, and I can only hope that I made the recipe better and not worse.

While I call this film simulation recipe “Warm Contrast” due to its intended replication, it’s not particularly warm nor especially high in contrast. It seems to work best in mid-contrast situations, and when the light is already a bit on the warm side. When it works, though, it looks really good. I can see why Manuel was interested in creating it. I’m sure some of you will appreciate these settings, and I’m eager to share them with you.

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August Wasatch – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Warm Contrast”

Thank you, Manuel, for sharing your settings, and allowing me the opportunity to tweak them. While I put “Fujifilm X-T30” in the title, this recipe can be used on any X-Trans III or IV camera. In low-contrast situations, going +4 on Shadow and +2 on Highlight might produce better results. In cooler light, -1 Red and -5 Blue might prove to be better. As always, don’t be afraid to season this film simulation recipe to taste.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +1
Shadow:+3
Color: +4
Sharpening: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
Grain: Strong
Color Chrome Effect: Off
White Balance: Auto, -2 Red & -4 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using these settings on my Fujifilm X-T30:

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Fighting Flamingos – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Duck In A Stream – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Rural Stream – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Bee On A Pink Flower – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Bee At Work – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Kids on a Bridge – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Confident Direction – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Leaves of Various Colors – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Looking Bird – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Yarn Owl – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Green Mountain Majesty – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Sloping Ridges – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Canvas Sky – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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American Fair – Salt Lake City, Utah – Fujifilm X-T30

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Comparing Film Simulation Recipes


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I shoot JPEGs, but it’s not uncommon for me to shoot RAW+JPEG, since it gives me the opportunity to reprocess the picture in-camera, which is helpful when developing different film simulation recipes. Because of this, I was able to process a single picture I captured recently on my Fujifilm X-T30 using many of my different recipes to compare the differences. I thought that this might be helpful to some of you. Perhaps there’s one recipe that stands out to you in the pictures below that you’ve never used. Obviously different settings look better in different situations, and in this article there’s just one picture to compare, so even though you might not like how one recipe looks in this article doesn’t mean that you wouldn’t like it with different subject and in a different light. The scope of this article is quite limited, but I hope that seeing the various film simulation recipes applied to a single exposure is helpful to someone.

Not every recipe was used for this post. Some of them require a specific parameter that was not available. For example, the picture at the top was made using my HP5 Plus Push-Process recipe, which requires an ultra-high ISO, so it wasn’t possible to apply it to the exposure below. Other recipes, such as my faded color and faded monochrome, require double exposures. There are other film simulation recipes that you could try not represented below, and I invite you to investigate the different options to see if there’s one or more that work well for your photography. Let me know in the comments which film simulation recipe is your favorite and which in your opinion fits the exposure below best.

Color

B&W

Fujifilm PRO Neg. Std Film Simulation Recipes

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Great Salt Lake Evening – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T20 – PRO Neg. Std

PRO Neg. Std is one of the least popular film simulations available on Fujifilm X-Trans cameras, so you might be surprised by the number of different film simulation recipes I created that use it as the base. At first PRO Neg. Std may seem flat and dull. It has the softest tonality of all the film simulation options, and it is one of the least saturated. Fujifilm modeled it after Fujicolor Pro 160 NS film printed on Fujicolor paper. It has a great analog print quality to it that can be quite appealing!

The PRO Neg. Std film simulation was inspired by a portrait film, so it’s no surprise that it is great for skin tones. By adjusting the settings, it can be made to resemble different negative films or produce different analog looks. I particularly appreciate how this film simulation handles shadows. Many of the different color film simulations that Fujifilm offers on their cameras handle shadows similar to reversal film, but not PRO Neg. Std, which has a negative film quality, particularly in the shadows.

Below you will find all of my different film simulation recipes that I have created that use PRO Neg. Std. If you haven’t tried them all, I personally invite you to do so and see which are your favorites! My personal favorites are Superia 800 and Pro 400H, but they each have their own usefulness and charm. Let me know in the comments which recipe you like most!

Even though the different recipes say X100F and X-T20, they are completely compatible with any Fujifilm X-Trans III or newer camera. For example, you don’t have to use the X100F recipes exclusively on the X100F. You can use any of my recipes on any X-Trans III camera.

Fujicolor Superia 800

CineStill 800T

Eterna

Aged Color

Fujicolor Pro 400H