Why Should You Become a Fuji X Weekly App Patron?

I’ve received feedback from a number of Fuji X Weekly App users with this suggestion: explain better the benefits of becoming a Patron. I’ve heard stories like, “I’ve had the app for awhile, but I didn’t realize how much better it was when you subscribe. I wish I’d known this months ago!” Let me lay out for you the benefits of becoming a Fuji X Weekly App Patron.

First, before I get too far into this, let me briefly explain what the App is and why you should go download it right now, if you don’t already have it on your phone. The Fuji X Weekly App is a mobile film simulation recipe library containing over 175 recipes for Fujifilm cameras. Film simulation recipes are JPEG settings that allow you to achieve various looks, many based on classic film stocks, straight-out-of-camera without the need to edit. These settings save you time, simplify the photographic process, and make capturing pictures even more enjoyable. If you own a Fujifilm camera, you should try these recipes and have the App on your phone. So take a moment right now to download the Fuji X Weekly App if you don’t already have it.

My film simulation recipes are completely free, and the Fuji X Weekly App is also free. There is absolutely no cost to you. It’s my gift to the Fujifilm community—it’s a real honor if you find it beneficial to your photography, as I’m happy to be helpful.

Within the App there is an option to become a Fuji X Weekly Patron (click the gear icon), which is $19.99 (USD + tax) for an annual subscription. Why should you subscribe? What benefits do Patrons get?

Becoming a Patron unlocks the best App experience.

This app does have some advanced features that can be unlocked by becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron! These advanced features include filtering by sensor or camera, as well as by film simulation or color/B&W, and the ability to favorite recipes for quick access. Let’s take a closer look at the benefits of these features.

Filtering

If you are using the free version of the App, you have to look at each recipe individually to discover which cameras it is compatible with. For example, if you open the Agfa Optima 200 recipe on the App and scroll down a little, it lists all of the fully compatible cameras that this recipe will work on. If your camera is listed, you can use the recipe, and if your camera isn’t listed, you probably need to keep looking. Alternatively, you could cross-reference the recipes using this website, which are sorted by sensor, as a method for narrowing your search.

There is an easier way, if you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron.

If your camera is, let’s say, a Fujifilm X-S10, you can Filter By Sensor, and select X-Trans IV, and you’ll find the Agfa Optima 200 recipe in the list, because that recipe is compatible with X-Trans IV cameras. If your camera is, let’s say, an X-E3, you can Filter By Sensor, and you’ll find the Agfa Optima 200 recipe in that list, too, because that recipe is also compatible with X-Trans III cameras. Another option is to Filter By Camera. You might think that the Agfa Optima 200 recipe would still show up—and it will for the X-E3—but it won’t show up for the X-S10. Why? Because that recipe isn’t fully compatible with all X-Trans IV cameras, and the X-S10 is one of those that the recipe won’t fully work with; however, it’s 99% compatible, so with one change you can use it. You see, newer X-Trans IV cameras have Grain Size (either Small or Large) that you must choose, a feature not found on older X-Trans IV and X-Trans III cameras, so that’s why it is only 99% compatible.

You have two options to narrow down the recipes that you can use—Sensor or Camera—and understanding these tools can help you find the recipe that you’re looking for. If you want a recipe that is 100% compatible with your camera, then Filter By Camera is what you want to use. Note that you can only choose one camera. If you want to find the most recipes that will work with your camera, but perhaps some aren’t 100% compatible (like Agfa Optima 200 on the X-S10) and you might have to make a choice on a setting (like Grain Size), or accept that it might produce a slightly different look (more on this in a moment), or you might even have to sort through some non-compatible recipes, then Filter By Sensor is what you want to use. Note that you can choose as many sensors as you’d like. If you have an X-S10 and if you Filter By Camera, you’ll find over 60 recipes that are 100% compatible with your camera. If you Filter By Sensor, choosing X-Trans III, X-Trans IV, and GFX, you’ll find over 140! Yes, you can use those 140+ recipes, but that’s a lot to go through.

Other cameras are in a similar situation. Bayer sensor cameras only have six recipes, but you can also use X-Trans I and X-Trans II recipes, although the results will be slightly different. You might like it, you might not, but you won’t know unless you try. If you Filter By Sensor and choose X-Trans I, X-Trans II, and Bayer, you’ll find nearly 40 recipes that will work on your Bayer camera. It’s a similar story if you have an X-Trans II camera. For GFX, many X-Trans IV recipes are compatible with GFX, but will render just slightly different. The bottom line is that you can Filter By Camera and get a limited list of fully compatible recipes that will look as intended on your camera, or you can Filter By Sensor (and even select multiple sensors) and potentially get a much bigger list of recipes that may or may not be good options for your camera model—you get to decide how adventurous you want to be.

In many cases, no matter if you Filter By Sensor or Filter By Camera, there’s still going to be a lot of recipes to choose from, and it can be overwhelming. That’s where Filter By Simulation or Filter By Color/BW comes in handy. If you know that you want a B&W recipe, you can remove all of the color recipes from the list, and if you know that you want a color recipe, you can remove all of the B&W recipes from the list. If you know that you want a Classic Chrome recipe, you can display only those that use Classic Chrome, or if you know that you want an Eterna recipe, you can display only those that use Eterna. These are great tools to really narrow down your search, which will save you time!

Fuji X Weekly App Patrons have a much easier time finding the recipes that they’re looking for. Yes, you could scroll through 175+ recipes individually to find the ones for your camera, or you can use the Filter options to quickly locate exactly what you want, and only Patrons can do that.

Favoriting

Another wonderful tool that is unlocked by becoming a Patron is the ability to Favorite recipes. Once you’ve narrowed down your list with the Filtering options, you can “Star” recipes, and they’ll show up at the top of the list. To Favorite a recipe, with the recipe open, tap the star in the upper-right corner. The Filtering options apply to Favorite recipes, which is demonstrated in the above screenshots. What’s great about this is that, if you have multiple generations of sensors, say X-Trans II and X-Trans III, you can Favorite recipes for both, and when you Filter for your X-Trans II camera, only X-Trans II recipes will show up, and the X-Trans III recipes that you put a Star on won’t display, and vice versa. You can use the Favorite tool to keep track of the recipes that you currently have programmed into your camera, or to list the ones that you want to someday try, or to note the ones that you’ve used and you really like.

Becoming a Patron unlocks early-access recipes.

Fuji X Weekly Patrons also get early access to some new film simulation recipes! There are currently 10 “early-access” film simulation recipes on the App (marked by an aperture symbol), that only Patrons can view. These recipes will eventually be free to everyone, but right now they’re only available to Patrons. As new early-access recipes are cycled into the App for Patrons, the others will be made available to all. My favorite Patron early-access recipes currently on the App are Vintage Color, Old Kodak, Pushed CineStill 800T, Kodacolor VR, and Vintage Negative. Getting early-access to some new film simulation recipes is a fun reward for your support.

Becoming a Patron supports Fuji X Weekly

Nothing is free. My film simulation recipes are free to you, both on this website and on the App, but that doesn’t mean that they’re free—it just means someone else is paying for it. As you can imagine, creating and maintaining an app isn’t cheap. Same for a website. Creating and sharing these recipes takes a lot of time and effort and sometimes even money. All of this is to say that Patrons support the App and website and future film simulation recipes and more! Their support leads to other great things, too, like the Community Recipes page, and even recipes for Ricoh cameras. Patrons partner with Fuji X Weekly for the benefit of the Fujifilm community and beyond, and without their support all of these great things, including the App, wouldn’t happen. Also, if you found film simulation recipes and the app useful to your photography, this is a great way to show your appreciation.

I want to give a big “thank you” to all of the Fuji X Weekly App Patrons! If you’re not already, consider becoming a Patron today.

To conclude, Fuji X Weekly Patrons unlock some great tools for the best app experience, plus they get early-access to some new recipes while supporting Fuji X Weekly for the benefit of the Fujifilm community and more. It’s a win-win!

I want to mention here at the very end of this article that we’re busy building a big App update that will add some great new functions and features. We’re working hard to get this update out before December, and with any luck it will happen. I think you’ll really appreciate these improvements, as they’ll make the Fuji X Weekly App even better!

Learn more about the Fuji X Weekly App here.

SOOC is Live Today!

Episode 04 of SOOC is live today! Join Fujifilm X-Photographer Nathalie Boucry (Tame Your Fujifilm) and Ritchie Roesch (Fuji X Weekly) as we discuss the Kodacolor film simulation recipe and so much more! This will be both educational and entertaining, and well worth your time. SOOC is an interactive program, so we need your participation! I personally invite you to tune in at 10 AM Pacific Time, 1 PM Eastern—if you are not sure what time it will be where you’re at, you can use this time zone converter. I hope to see you soon!

New Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Pushed CineStill 800T (X100V & X-Pro3)

City Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Pushed CineStill 800T”

The Fuji X Weekly app is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best app experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new film simulation recipes. These early-access recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many early-access recipes have already been publicly published on this blog and the app, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no app. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

A few days back I published a Patron early-access recipe called “Pushed CineStill 800T” that was compatible with the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras, and I immediately received requests for an alternate version for the X100V and X-Pro3. I was able to get pretty darn close! While this new Patron early-access recipe is for those with an X100V or X-Pro3, it is also compatible with the X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II, and if you have one of those cameras you will have to decide which version to use—even though they’re both nearly identical, you might prefer one over the other.

Both recipes mimic the look of push-processed CineStill 800T film. To create this aesthetic, I studied overcast daytime examples of the film, and, interestingly enough, it did quite well at night, too; however, I do believe it more faithfully mimics the film in cloudy daytime conditions—it does produce nice results in daylight or night, so feel free to use it anytime. Film can look different depending on how it is shot, developed, printed, or scanned. This recipe doesn’t replicate pushed CineStill 800T film under all circumstances, but in certain conditions it’s a good facsimile. I really like how this one looks, and I think some of you will really appreciate it, too!

If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the app!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Pushed CineStill 800T” film simulation recipe:

Gas Pumps at Night – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Nighttime Neighborhood – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Night Walkway – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Nighttime Flowerpot – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Potted Shrub – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Cigarettes – Reno, NV – Fujifilm X100V
Burger Boy – Reno, NV – Fujifilm X100V
Playground Girl – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Rose Garden – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Hoop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Fujifilm X-T1 (X-Trans II) Film Simulation Recipe: CineStill 800T

Night Synergy – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “CineStill 800T”

This is my favorite CineStill 800T film simulation recipe. I created my first CineStill 800T recipe, which is intended for X-Trans III cameras, over three years ago. My next version, which is intended for newer X-Trans IV cameras, was published nearly a year ago. This X-Trans II recipe was one of the original Patron “Early-Access” recipes on the Fuji X Weekly App. In other words, those who are Patrons on the App have already had access to this recipe, and now that another recipe has replaced it, this CineStill 800T recipe is available to everyone! Early-Access to some new recipes is one of the benefits of being a Fuji X Weekly Patron, and a great way to support this website.

CineStill 800T is Kodak Vision3 500T motion picture film that’s been modified for use in 35mm film cameras and development using the C-41 process. Because it has the RemJet layer removed, it is more prone to halation. The “T” in the name means tungsten-balanced, which is a fancy way of saying that it is white-balanced for artificial light and not daylight. CineStill 800T has become a popular film for after-dark photography.

Pair – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “CineStill 800T”

Even though the film that this recipe is intended to mimic is Tungsten-balanced, it can still produce interesting pictures in daylight. It’s a versatile recipe, but it definitely delivers the best results in artificial light. When I photograph with my Fujifilm X-T1 after sunset, this is the recipe that I use.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +2 (Hard)
Shadow: +1 (Medium-Hard)
Color: -1 (Medium-Low)
Sharpness: 0 (Standard)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: 4300K, -3 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 3200

Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured on my Fujifilm X-T1 using this CineStill 800T film simulation recipe:

Red Hatchback – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
We Care About Asada Nachos – Centerville, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Shoe Repair in Disrepair – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Vending Machines – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Narrow Drive – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
2nd & Main – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
The Kaysville Theatre – Kaysville, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Park Gazebo – Clinton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Fall Branch – Clinton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Cut Off – Clinton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Find this film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X-Trans II Patron Early-Access Recipe: Color Negative Film

Yellow – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Color Negative Film”

One of my favorite X-Trans I film simulation recipes is Color Negative Film, which has a white balance shift inspired by my Fujicolor 100 Industrial recipe. This new recipe, available as a Patron Early-Access Recipe on the Fuji X Weekly App, is an adaptation of the X-Trans I recipe for X-Trans II. It doesn’t mimic any specific film, but just has a more generic film aesthetic. It’s not an exact match to the X-Trans I recipe, but it’s pretty close.

The Fuji X Weekly app is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best app experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new film simulation recipes. These early-access recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many early-access recipes have already been publicly published on this blog and the app, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no app. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

No Swimming – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – “Color Negative Film”

If you have an X-Trans II camera and are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the app!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Color Negative Film” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T1:

Sunlit Leaves – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Green Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – Photo by Jon Roesch
Early Autumn – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Forest Trail – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
One Dead Leaf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Backlit Autumn Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Autumn Flare – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Changing Leaves in the Woods – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Yellow Shrub – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Trail to the Trees – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Water Logged – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1 – Photo by Jon Roesch
Little Purple Blooms – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1
Reeds of Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T1

Tip: How to Remember Which Film Simulation Recipe You Used

I get asked sometimes how I know which film simulation recipes I used for certain pictures. Especially when I take a road trip where I might use a number of different recipes, it can be difficult to remember which ones I used when. Honestly, I didn’t have a good method for this. I would limit myself to only a few recipes, and tried to avoid using similar-looking recipes on the same day. If I still didn’t remember, I would go back into the camera and display the picture information to give myself a clue. However, I recently became aware of a much better method.

In Episode 02 of SOOC, X-Photographer Nathalie Boucry shared her smart solution for this common problem. Whenever Nathalie is out shooting, when she switches to a new recipe, the very first exposure that she makes is a snap of her phone with the Fuji X Weekly App open and the recipe she’s using displayed. Then she knows that every picture after that (until she reaches the next image of her phone) was captured with that recipe. I began doing this myself, and it works very well. Yes, it takes an extra moment “in the field” to snap an image of your phone, and it does take a little extra space on the memory card, but it can definitely save you time (and sanity) later as you try to figure out what recipe you used for that picture.

First image captured after switching recipes is an image of the Fuji X Weekly App with the recipe displayed.
Now I know that I used the Positive Film recipe for this picture.

This is a tip that I know will be helpful to some of you, because it was helpful to me. These kinds of tips and tricks are what you’ll find in the SOOC live video series. Episode 03 is this Thursday, September 9. It’s an interactive program, and your participation makes the show even better, so I hope to see you then!

If you haven’t downloaded the Fuji X Weekly App, be sure to do so. It’s free, and available for both Android and Apple. If you are looking for a way to support Fuji X Weekly and all that I’m doing for the community plus unlock the best app experience, consider becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron (available in the app)!

The Fuji X Weekly Moment CineBloom Giveaway Winners!

The Fuji X Weekly Moment CineBloom Giveaway has ended! I want to give a big “Thank You” to everyone who participated—there were over 400 submissions! The winners, who were randomly selected, are:
@alex_fricke_365
@stephen.wells
@bruce_martin_photographe
@fotografik_westphalen
@henrikbratt

Congratulations to these five winners! I know you will appreciate using the filters!

CineBloom diffusion filters are a great way to take the “digital edge” off of your photographs, giving them an analog-like feel. Diffusion filters have been popular in cinematography for awhile, and people are beginning to realize that they’re great for still photography, too. These filters pair especially well with my Film Simulation Recipes, and are a wonderful tool for the JPEG photographer.

I want to give a huge shout-out to Moment for teaming up with Fuji X Weekly to make this giveaway possible! They did it because they’re big fans of this website, Fujifilm cameras, film simulation recipes, and the Fujifilm community. Moment’s website (shopmoment.com) is definitely one of the better camera stores out there (yet, really, they are so very much more than just “a camera store”). If you’ve never visited Moment, be sure to do so—you can thank me later.

Even though the Fuji X Weekly Moment giveaway has ended, please continue to use the #fujixweeklymoment hashtag on Instagram. I love seeing your Fuji X Weekly moments, and I hope you continue sharing them!

Also, while I’m here, if you haven’t downloaded the Fuji X Weekly App, be sure to do so. It’s free, and available for both Android and Apple. If you are looking for a way to support Fuji X Weekly and all that I’m doing for the community plus unlock the best app experience, consider becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron (available in the app)!

The Fuji X Weekly Moment – Update 4

The Fuji X Weekly moment CineBloom giveaway is in its final hours. There’s not much time, so I hope that you participated for a chance to win one of five Cinebloom diffusion filters. The full rules and details are found here. So far, there have been over 400 submissions! Check out the #fujixweeklymoment hashtag on Instagram to see them all.

I want to give a huge “Thank You” to Moment for teaming up with Fuji X Weekly to make this giveaway possible! They did it because they’re big fans of this website, Fujifilm cameras, film simulation recipes, and the Fujifilm community. Moment’s website (shopmoment.com) is definitely one of the better camera stores out there (yet, really, they are so very much more than just “a camera store”). If you’ve never visited Moment, be sure to do so—you can thank me later.

I hope to announce the five Cinebloom diffusion filter winners on Monday (September 6th), so stay tuned!

Also, while I’m here, if you haven’t downloaded the Fuji X Weekly App, be sure to do so. It’s free, and available for both Android and Apple. If you are looking for a way to support Fuji X Weekly and all that I’m doing for the community plus unlock the best app experience, consider becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron (available in the app)!

Fujifilm X100V (X-Trans III + X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Monochrome Negative

Windows Within Windows – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Monochrome Negative”

It’s been awhile since I created a black-and-white film simulation recipe. Part of it is that my favorite recipe is Kodak Tri-X 400, and I often choose to shoot with that. Another factor is that the differences between monochrome recipes are often much more subtle than color. For this, I didn’t start out with the intention of making a black-and-white recipe—in fact, it began with Classic Negative—and I wasn’t satisfied with the look, so I switched to Acros, and immediately liked what I saw. A few small changes later, and this recipe was born. It’s not modeled after any specific film, so I named it Monochrome Negative, as it does have a nice film-like quality to it.

The trick to this film simulation recipe is underexposure. I found myself most often lowering the exposure by 1/3 or 2/3 stops (many of my recipes often call for the opposite). Highlight set to +3 will keep the image bright, while the underexposure will deepen the shadows and provide good contrast. Obviously each exposure should be judged individually, so don’t be afraid to deviate from this advice.

Happy Birthday Glasses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Monochrome Negative”

This recipe was designed on and intended for the Fujifilm X100V, which has a newer X-Trans IV sensor, but because I didn’t use any of the new tools, such as Clarity and the Color Chrome Effects, this recipe is compatible with all X-Trans III & IV cameras. On X-Pro3 and newer, choose Grain size Small; on all other cameras, which don’t have Grain size as an option, simply select Grain Strong. If your camera has the Acros film simulation, you can use this recipe!

Acros (+Y, +R, +G)
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +3
Shadow: 0
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: 0
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
(Strong for those cameras without Grain Size)
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, 0 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 12800
Exposure Compensation: 0 to -2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Monochrome Negative” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

1104B – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Withering Flowers Along a Wall – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
City Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Backlit Turning Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Pikachu is a Little Hungry – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Space Fish – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Release – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Geese by a Tackle Box – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Do or Don’t Follow the Crowd – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Approaching Storm – Antelope Island SP, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

The Fuji X Weekly Moment (Plus: CineBloom Diffusion Filter Giveaway!)

What is your Fuji X Weekly moment?

Which film simulation recipe is your favorite? What location did you last use it? How has it changed your photography? When is the Fuji X Weekly App most helpful to you? Share with me your Fuji X Weekly moment, and be entered to win a CineBloom diffusion filter (details below)!

Fuji X Weekly and Moment are teaming up to give away five CineBloom diffusion filters! Yes, that’s right—you could win one of five CineBloom filters!

CineBloom diffusion filters are a great way to take the “digital edge” off of your photographs, giving them an analog-like feel. Diffusion filters have been popular in cinematography for awhile, and people are beginning to realize that they’re great for still photography, too. These filters pair especially well with my Film Simulation Recipes, and are a wonderful tool for the JPEG photographer.

The Rules

These rules are pretty simple, but it is important that you follow each step.

  • First, if you don’t already, be sure to follow Fuji X Weekly and Moment on Instagram (here and here). This isn’t actually a requirement to win, but it would be great if you would do this (hey, we’re giving away free stuff!). While you’re at it, feel free to follow us on YouTube, too (here and here).
  • Next, on Instagram, share a picture that you’ve captured using a Fuji X Weekly film simulation recipe on your Fujifilm camera. Which recipe? Whichever one you want—there are over 150 to choose from! State in the post description that you used a Fuji X Weekly recipe and which recipe you used. It would be great if you could mention the Fuji X Weekly app, because I’m hoping to reach people who don’t yet know about recipes and the app. Maybe something like, “This is my Fuji X Weekly moment. Captured on my #Fujifilm #XPro2 with the @fujixweekly Kodachrome II film simulation recipe, which I found on the Fuji X Weekly App.” There are no rules for the exact wording, so don’t sweat it. Say what comes naturally to you, because I’d rather you say something authentic. Definitely let me know what your Fuji X Weekly moment is and why.
  • Third, tag a friend, especially if you think that friend might be interested in film simulation recipes or photography. If you don’t want to tag a friend, tag a photographer that you follow on Instagram. Or tag a famous photographer, such as @stevemccurryofficial, @petesouza, @chrisburkard, @seantuck, or someone else like that. Be sure to tag someone, or even several someones if you’d like.
  • Lastly—and this is highly important—use the hashtag #fujixweeklymoment when you post your picture. If you want, you can include this in the second-step statement (for example: “This is my #fujixweeklymoment.”). Then post your picture to Instagram!

That’s it! Well, sort of. There are actually several more rules, which you’ll find below.

The Fuji X Weekly Moment giveaway runs from from August 21, 2021 through September 4, 2021.

There will be five winners. Each winner will receive a code that can be redeemed from Moment for one CineBloom diffusion filter. Winners will be randomly selected (this is not a photography contest). Enter by using the #fujixweeklymoment hashtag on Instagram—each picture posted with that hashtag is one entry. You can enter up to five times; if you post more than five pictures, you’ll only be entered five times (but feel free to post as many pictures as you’d like!). Please keep the pictures family-friendly/safe-for-work. Each person can only win one prize. Winners will be announced between September 6th and 14th (hopefully on September 6th) and will be notified via an Instagram direct message (DM). Void where prohibited. By entering, you agree to all of these rules, Instagram’s policies, and all laws that may govern this giveaway. Fuji X Weekly and Moment are not responsible for any rule or law violations.

“Per Instagram rules, this promotion is in no way sponsored, administered, or associated with Instagram, Inc. By entering, entrants confirm that they are 13+ years of age, release Instagram of responsibility, and agree to Instagram’s terms of use.”

Don’t have the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App? Find it in the Google Play and Apple App Stores!

Be sure to share this article on your social media channels to help get the word out! Thank you, have fun, and good luck!

Fujifilm X-Trans III + X-T3 & X-T30 Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Kodacolor VR

Inside City Creek – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

This film simulation recipe was an experiment. I started out with my Fujicolor 100 Industrial recipe, but instead of using a cool White Balance with a warm White Balance Shift, I did the opposite: I used a warm White Balance with a cool shift. After many adjustments to various settings, this ended up not resembling the Fujicolor 100 Industrial recipe much at all, but it does have a great vintage print-film aesthetic that I really like.

I wasn’t sure at first which film this recipe most closely resembled (since it wasn’t intended to mimic any specific film), although it seemed to have some similarities to Kodacolor VR. I already have a Kodacolor recipe, which does a great job at mimicking Kodacolor VR; this recipe and that one look somewhat similar, but definitely different. Then I ran across some pictures that looked very similar to the ones you see in this article, and it turned out that they were shot on Kodacolor VR film that had expired. So I think this recipe, while it does resemble Kodacolor VR, as well as ColorPlus 200 (which is a direct descendant of that film), it most closely looks like Kodacolor VR that’s been stored a little past its expiration date. Of course, one film can have many different looks, depending on how it was shot, developed, scanned and/or printed, and (in this case) stored, so this recipe serves as a nice alternative to my original Kodacolor recipe.

Leaning Tower – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

The Fuji X Weekly app is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best app experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new film simulation recipes. These early-access recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many early-access recipes have already been publicly published on this blog and the app, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no app. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new Patron early-access recipe is compatible with Fujifilm X-Trans III and X-Trans IV cameras. For those with newer cameras, set Color Chrome FX Blue to Off, Clarity to 0 (or perhaps -2), and I’d suggest Grain size Large, but use Small if you prefer.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the app!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Kodacolor VR” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

Summer Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Corner Through Leaves – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Stones & Glass Ceiling – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Glass – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Building a Building – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Small Spaces Between – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Twilight Telephone Poles – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Stoneground – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Goes for Gold – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Night Parking – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Doki Doki – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Escalators – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Downtown Buildings – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Coming Train – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Trax – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Waiting on the Platform – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Glass & Sky – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Tall Downtown Buildings – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fuji Features: Fuji X Weekly App

You guys all know about the Fuji X Weekly App, and I’m sure many of you have it on your phone. I wanted to mention the app again because early work has begun on a big update coming (hopefully) later this year. It will take awhile to get ready, but it will add some great functionality and features that will make it even better, and I think you’ll really appreciate the changes. I can’t yet discuss the specifics—just know that some great improvements are in the works.

Below are some articles and videos that I found via Google and YouTube that mention the Fuji X Weekly App. I’m sure that I missed a few (if you know of one, feel fee to share it in the comments), but you’ll find quite a few if you need some material to help you get through another Monday.

Exibart Street
Fujirumors
PetaPixel
Island in the Net
Fujistas

***Edit: I missed this one from just today!***

Petapixel

Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipe: AgfaChrome RS 100

H&M – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “AgfaChrome RS 100”

I was asked to create a film simulation recipe for AgfaChrome RS 100 color transparency film. Agfa made this slide film from 1984 through 1995, with an “improved emulsion” released in 1992. I never used AgfaChrome RS 100, so I have zero experience with the film. It was difficult to find examples of, and old issues of Popular Photography and Photographic magazines were my best resource. Despite the challenges, I was able to create a film simulation recipe that I’m very happy with.

This AgfaChrome RS 100 recipe renders pictures beautifully! It has a great vintage analog feel to it. People might think that the images are old film pictures that you scanned, and they certainly won’t suspect that they’re straight-out-of-camera JPEGs! I’m confident that this recipe will be an instant favorite for many of you.

Flower Garden – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “AgfaChrome RS 100”

Because this X-Trans IV recipe requires Classic Negative, Clarity, and Color Chrome FX Blue, it’s only compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 cameras—unfortunately it’s not compatible with the X-T3 and X-T30. I believe that it is compatible with the GFX100S, although results will likely be slightly different. If you have a compatible camera, be sure to give this AgfaChrome RS 100 recipe a try!

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: -1
Color: +2
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -2
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Daylight, -3 Red & +5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “AgfaChrome RS 100” film simulation recipe on my X100V and X-E4:

Bowl on a Shelf – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Parking Garage – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Below Deck Parking – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Smile – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Little Dragon – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Free People – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Towering Cloud – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Drive Slow, But Don’t Park – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Checkerboard – Scottsdale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Patagonia – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Green Grapes – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Blackberries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Pink Among Green – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Little Cherries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Permission to Park – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
One Way – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Honey Bucket & Trailer – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
We Are Open – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Park City Downtown – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Buildings in Downtown Park City – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Church Cans – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Gas Sign – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X-Trans I (X-E1 + X-Pro1) Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Ektachrome

Diesel – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Ektachrome”

The Fuji X Weekly app is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best app experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new film simulation recipes. These early-access recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many early-access recipes have already been publicly published on this blog and the app, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no app. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new Patron early-access recipe is called “Ektachrome” and is compatible with the Fujifilm X-E1 and X-Pro1 cameras. Unfortunately, even though the X-M1 is X-Trans I, this recipe is not compatible with that camera. I really like how this one looks, and I think some of you will really appreciate it, too!

Ektachrome is a line of color transparency film introduced by Kodak in the 1940’s. I did some research, and counted 40 different emulsions over the years that carried the Ektachrome name! Generally speaking, Ektachrome was less warm than Kodachrome (although it depends on which Ektachrome you’re referring to), and also less archival. While Kodachrome was discontinued in 2009, Ektachrome can still be purchased today.

Two Cans – Weber Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1

I’m not certain which (of the 40) Ektachrome films this recipe most closely resembles. It has more of a general Ektachrome feel rather than being an exact copy of a specific emulsion. If you like the Kodachrome II recipe that I just published, you’ll like this one, too!

If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the app!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Ektachrome” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-Pro1:

House Flag – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Dead Wood – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Cattails – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Succulent Shelf – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Ektachrome”
Boy On Couch Watching TV – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Drinking Fountain – Weber Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Two Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Berries in a Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Blackberry Bush – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Francis Peak Summer – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

Fujifilm X-Trans I Film Simulation Recipe: Color Negative Film

Pink Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Color Negative Film”

This Fujifilm X-Trans I film simulation recipe was the first that I created after getting my nine-year-old X-Pro1 camera in the mail. It wasn’t intended to mimic the look of any particular film. I was trying to create a good-looking recipe with a white balance shift inspired by my Fujicolor 100 Industrial recipe. It has a wonderful print film aesthetic, perhaps Kodak-like, that looks especially nice in sunny conditions. I call this recipe “Color Negative Film” because of that generic color negative film quality.

If you are a Patron on the Fuji X Weekly App, you’ve had early access to this recipe since May. A different recipe has replaced it, so if you are a Patron, look for that new early-access recipe in the app! For those who are not Patrons, this recipe is now available to you. If you have a Fujifilm X-Pro1, X-E1, or X-M1, this recipe is compatible with your camera.

Diesel Cash Price – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Color Negative Film”

If you have a Fujifilm Bayer camera, I invite you to try this recipe on your camera, although results will be a little different. Technically, X-Trans II cameras can use it, too, although it definitely won’t look the same—maybe you’ll like it, maybe you won’t. If you have an X-Trans I camera, this is a must-try recipe that many of you are sure to love!

Provia
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2 (High)
Shadow: +2 (High)
Color: -2 (Low)
Sharpness: -1 (Medium-Low)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: 3000K, +8 Red & -9 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Color Negative Film” recipe:

Rising Up – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Red Leaves of Summer – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Backlit White Blossom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Yellow Bench – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Tiny Fruit – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Blackberry Forest – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Building Mountain Storm – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Dead Stump – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Log Bridge – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Cone Closed – Weber Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

New Fujifilm X-Trans IV Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Silver Summer

Wrong Way Shadow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Silver Summer”

The Fuji X Weekly app is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best app experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new film simulation recipes. These early-access recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many early-access recipes have already been publicly published on this blog and the app, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no app. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new Patron early-access recipe is called “Silver Summer” and is compatible with the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10, and X-E4 X-Trans IV cameras. It’s not modeled after any specific film, but it definitely has an analog aesthetic. It does have some unintentional similarities to Lomography Cine 200, but it’s definitely not an exact match. I really like how this one looks, and I think some of you will really appreciate it, too!

If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the app!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Silver Summer” film simulation recipe:

Bee on a Thistle – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Lily – Sundance, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Tree Branch and Creek – Sundance, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Mountain Sky – Sundance, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Zigzag Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Concessions – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Summer Slide – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Wood Coaster – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Don’t Stand – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Summer Swing – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Chains – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Two Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipes: Expired Slide + Expired Slide v2

United Carrier – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Expired Slide”
United Carrier – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Expired Slide v2”

I set out to recreate the look of expired slide film. Perhaps expired is the wrong term, because the aesthetic that I was after is more like mishandled slide film—not stored correctly or developed promptly. Maybe it passed its expiration date because it sat in a drawer for so long, or maybe it was in a hot car for a couple of hours, but, whatever the reason, it definitely doesn’t look right.

Why would I want to create this look? Because it’s an interesting vintage aesthetic that was somewhat common in the film era. While most people would not want this outcome, interestingly enough, there are some film photographers (a.k.a. Lomographers) who do this kind of thing on purpose specifically because they want this look. The two film simulation recipes below are for those people seeking something different. Neither of these will likely be anyone’s “go-to” recipe, but if you want something that’s a bit unusual, these are ones to try.

The film simulation recipe called Expired Slide was actually the second one, as I created (what I now call) Expired Slide v2 first. I liked the original settings, but thought that it might be a bit too much, so I toned it back slightly. I posted examples of both recipes to Instagram and let you guys decide which one was best. The Expired Slide recipe won hands-down, but there were some who passionately preferred Expired Slide v2, so I’m posting both. The only difference is the white balance (and shift), otherwise they’re identical. Expired Slide has more of a red-orange cast while Expired Slide v2 has more of a red-purple cast. Both recipes (as of this writing) are only compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4 cameras.

Expired Slide:

Forest Flowers – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X-E4

Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: -1
Color: -4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -2
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: 5500K, +7 Red & -2 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Limited 4404 – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Free – Boise, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Free Signs – Boise, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Construction Crane – Boise, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
10:45 – Boise, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Red Fence – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Tulip Blooms – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Dark Payette Lake – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Mossy Trunk – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X-E4

Expired Slide v2:

Caterpillar – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4

Velvia
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: -1
Color: -4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -2
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: 5000K, +8 Red & 0 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Red Barn – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Jump Pad – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Stack of Buckets – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
The Oaks – Ogden Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Lake Marina – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Two Dogs Swimming – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Jon Fishin’ – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Log in the Water – McCall, ID – Fujifilm X-E4
Payette Lakeshore – Ponderosa State Park, ID – Fujifilm X-E4

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

$2.00

7 New Fujicolor Pro 400H Film Simulation Recipes!

Pink Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Fujicolor Pro 400H Box Speed”

In my last post, entitled A Different Approach, I shared Anders Lindborg‘s new take on film simulation recipes, which included seven different Fujicolor Pro 160NS recipes that he invented. This is Part 2 of that article. Below you’ll find another seven recipes, this time for Fujicolor Pro 400H! If you haven’t read the first post, you’ll want to do that now, because this will make a lot more sense if you have that prerequisite understanding.

If you don’t want to take the time to read it (or if you’ve already forgotten), here’s a quick summery. Anders’ approach is to have a good base recipe that works well in most circumstances, but also have subtle variations of that recipe, that mimic pushed and pulled film, for when the conditions require either less contrast (pulled) or more contrast (pushed). You can use all seven Custom Presets in the Q Menu to save each of these recipes if you want, or just save the base recipe (called “Box Speed”) and adjust to the various variations on-the-fly, or save the base setting and have the variations programmed into X RAW Studio. Also, by design these recipes will work with any film simulation, even though they call for PRO Neg. Hi.

Like the 160NS recipe, I’m only including the “Box Speed” version in the Fuji X Weekly app, and I encourage you to use the Notes section under the recipe to store the pushed and pulled variations. These seven Fujicolor Pro 400H recipes are compatible with the Fujifilm X-T3 and X-T30 cameras. If you have a newer X-Trans IV camera (X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4), Anders recommends setting Clarity to -3 and Grain to Weak & Large. If you have an X-Trans III camera, ignore Color Chrome Effect; the results will be slightly different, but it will still produce good results. For Pushed +3 and Pushed +4, feel free to try Grain Strong.

This recipe wasn’t intended to mimic Fujicolor Pro 400H film, but it does resemble it fairly well. A lot of people like to overexpose real 400H film to get a pastel look; unfortunately, this recipe won’t achieve that particular aesthetic (but look here and here). Anders created this recipe by modifying his Pro 160NS settings; I made a couple of small modifications to it, but mostly these settings are created by him. Thank you, Anders, for creating these recipes and allowing me to share them!

Fujicolor Pro 400H Box Speed

Pops of Red – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: 0
Shadow: 0
Color: +1
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Free Pie – South Ogden, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Birthday Girl Coloring – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Shelf Plant – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 400H Pulled -1

Snail – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: -1
Color: +1
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pulled -1: HL & SH -1.

Green Aspen Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Tank Cars – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Yellow Cat – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 400H Pulled -2

Hazy Mountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: -1
Color: 0
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pulled -2: HL -2, SH -1, CLR 0.

Box Cars – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Suburban Sunset – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Hazy Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 400H Pushed +1

Yucca Leaves – Uintah, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: 0
Color: +1
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pushed +1: HL +1.

Red Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Tree & Dark Clouds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
David Baldwin – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 400H Pushed +2

Wood Stripes – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: 0
Color: +2
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pushed +2: HL +2, CLR +2.

Mountain Biking – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Radar Mountain – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Bloomin’ Onion – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 400H Pushed +3

Three Artificial Plants – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2
Shadow: +1
Color: +3
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -3
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pushed +3: HL +2, SH +1, CLR +3.

Berry Bush Leaves #1 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Berry Bush Leaves #2 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Sky Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujicolor Pro 400H Pushed +4

Old Phone – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

PRO Neg. Hi
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +3
Shadow: +2
Color: +4
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Weak
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -4
White Balance: Daylight, +1 Red & -3 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

If you are adding this recipe to the Notes in the app, consider using this abbreviation: Pushed +4: HL +3, SH +2, CLR +4, SHARP -4.

Berry Bush Leaves #3 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Green – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Landscape Leaves – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Below are examples of using the Fujicolor Pro 160NS Box Speed recipe using other film simulations. You can do this with all of the pull and push variants, too, although I didn’t supply any examples of those because this article is already very long.

PRO Neg. Hi “Box Speed”
Provia “Box Speed”
Velvia “Box Speed”
Astia “Box Speed”
Classic Chrome “Box Speed”
PRO Neg. Std “Box Speed”
Eterna “Box Speed”
Acros “Box Speed”
Monochrome “Box Speed”

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Fuji X Weekly App Named a Top Camera App!

The Fuji X Weekly — Film Simulation Recipes App was named a “best Android camera app of 2021” by LeapDroid (read the article here)! Wow! I’m so surprised, and highly honored. Really, I’m shocked, as I never anticipated this kind of acclaim.

The article states that the apps in the list were selected for “exceptional performance” in one of three categories: User Experience, Core Functionality, or Innovated Solution. I’d be curious to know which category the app scored exceptionally well in. The article goes on to say that the list “is ranked based on a balance of review ratings, and number of reviews.” In other words, the Fuji X Weekly App made the “best Android camera app” list because of you! I’m grateful, and humbled by your kindness and support!

Of course the elephant in the room is that the Fuji X Weekly App isn’t a camera app (although it is definitely closely related to cameras and photography). Still, I’ll take it. A lot of work went into creating the app, and a lot of work continues to go into it, as some great improvements are in the works, which I hope to get out later this year.

I want to give a “thank you” to LeapDroid for including the Fuji X Weekly App in their list and an even bigger “thank you” to everyone who downloaded the app and gave it a review. You are appreciated! Also, I have to pause here for a moment and give a huge shout-out to Sahand Nayebaziz, who’s really the one that made this app (and the iOS version) happen. He’s the brains and skills behind the programming, and a talented photographer, too, who shoots a Fujifilm X-T4, often with the Kodak Portra 400 film simulation recipe. Thanks, Sahand!

Over 150 Film Simulation Recipes on the Fuji X Weekly App!

The Fuji X Weekly App surpassed a big milestone: it now has over 150 film simulation recipes!

Those recipes in the app are the same ones that you know and love from this website, but now take them with you on the go, and have them at your fingertips wherever you are! I made most of the recipes myself, which you can imagine takes a lot of time and work. There are some recipes that were created by others—fans of this website—and I always ask for and receive permission before publishing; plus several recipes that were a collaborative effort between myself and others. With all of these recipes, there are a whole lot of different picture aesthetics that you can get straight out of your Fujifilm camera. There’s nothing like this with any other camera brand!

Really, though, the app is just the beginning. There are so many great things that are in the works right now! I wish that I could share them with you, but I’m keeping it all under wraps until they’re closer to being ready. It takes time, and there are plenty roadblocks that I could encounter. I don’t want to overpromise and underdeliver. What I can say is that these things wouldn’t be possible without the support of Fuji X Weekly Patrons. Yes, becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks advanced features on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App and gives you the best app experience, but what it really does is allow these great things that are in the works to become reality. Without the Fuji X Weekly Patrons these things wouldn’t happen, so let me give a big “Thank you!” to all the Patrons! Hopefully within the next few months I can begin to reveal and announce some of these great new things.

As always, I’m continuously working on new film simulation recipes. I have many that are being tested right now, and a long list of others that I plan to tackle. At the current rate, there could be over 200 film simulation recipes on this website and the app by the end of the year! Amazing!

Let me know in the comments which recipe is your personal favorite!