There’s an Easier Way — JPEG Photography for a Faster Workflow

Arches National Park, Utah — iPhone 11 — RitchieCam App — Analog Gold filter

“I’ve been working on my photos from October rather than reviews….”

—Ken Rockwell, February 2, 2023

I just stumbled upon that quote from Ken, which was followed by an iPhone photo from October (that’s why this article begins with an iPhone picture). I bet a lot of you can relate to his statement. When you photograph a lot, your post-processing workflow can get backed up quite a bit. I have thousands of unprocessed RAW files that have been sitting on a now-obsolete computer’s hard drive for at least seven years now. I get it: you’ve got stuff to do, and your limited time is being pulled every which way, so something’s got to give.

I discovered that there’s a better way. There’s no need to get four or five months behind. There’s no need to let your photographic work back up so much. You can can accomplish so much more with the time that you’ll save. What is this better way? It’s really simple: shoot JPEGs, and skip the picture editing step (called One Step Photography, as explained by Ansel Adams in his book Polaroid Land Camera). More and more photographers are embracing this approach.

Sitting Above Horseshoe Bend – Horseshoe Bend, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Pergear 10mm – “The Rockwell” Recipe

Ken Rockwell knows this. Not only does he often shoot JPEGs, but he once tried one of my Film Simulation Recipes on a Fujifilm camera. He shoots with a lot of brands, and Fujifilm isn’t his main make. I have Film Simulation Recipes for Fujifilm cameras, I have Recipes for Ricoh GR cameras, and I have an iPhone camera app called RitchieCam; if you don’t shoot with Fujifilm, Ricoh, or iPhone, your options are much more limited (I did make a few Recipes for Nikon Z, too, but it’s a pretty small number).

The reason why it’s important to shoot with Recipes is because the settings have been fine-tuned to produce a particular aesthetic that doesn’t require editing. The images look good straight from the camera, as if they had been post-processed or perhaps were even shot on film. Except they weren’t, which saves you a ton of time, money, and hassle. If you aren’t shooting with Recipes, you are most certainly doing some amount of post-processing, whether you shoot RAW or JPEG. There are some people who do still edit their camera-made-using-Recipes JPEGs, but they’re doing much less editing than they otherwise would be. The point of using Film Simulation Recipes is to edit less or (preferably) not at all, which has a huge upside, but it does require Recipes that produce excellent results, and a little extra care by the photographer in the field, since “I’ll fix it in post” isn’t really an option.

If Ken had used a Fujifilm camera programmed with Fuji X Weekly Recipes, surely he would not be busy right now post-processing pictures captured way back in October. Instead, he’d be writing those reviews that have been delayed, or out on some other photographic adventure. The October exposures would have been completed in October, or maybe early November at the latest. If he had used RitchieCam, there would be no need to process his iPhone images with Skylum software, because they would have been ready-to-publish the moment they were captured. Ken, you should try my iPhone camera app. And you should shoot with Fujifilm cameras more often.

Captured at the end of October, posted to Instagram the next day, and published on this website November 8th.

With the Canikony brands, shooting awesome straight-out-of-camera (SOOC) JPEGs isn’t as easy or prevalent. Sure, it can be done, but it is much more often done with other brands because of things like the Fuji X Weekly App, which contains approaching 300 Film Simulation Recipes for Fujifilm cameras, so no matter your desired aesthetic, there’s a Recipe for you. Download the Fuji X Weekly App for free today (Android here, Apple here), and consider becoming a Patron subscriber to unlock the best App experience. Ken is sitting at a computer right now fiddling with files, since he didn’t shoot with Fujifilm cameras programmed with Film Simulation Recipes.

People seem to either love or hate Ken Rockwell. To be clear, this article is not bashing him. I’ve actually had correspondence with Ken, and he seems like a very nice guy. I think his “real” personality is much more kind and genuine than his online persona, which can sometimes come across as abrasive and perhaps even offensive. If you hate him, I would suggest that you reach out to him with an open mind and heart, and try to get to know him a little, because your mind might get changed, even if just a bit. Personally, I have found some of his articles, insights, and commentary to be quite helpful; however, I certainly don’t agree with everything that he says, and I take his words with a grain of salt (as you should with mine). He’s very successful at what he does, so he’s obviously doing something “right” even if I don’t fully agree with what it is.

All of that is to say, if you don’t want your workflow backed up for months because you have so many exposures to edit, and you’d rather spend your time doing something else—including capturing more photographs—then SOOC JPEGs might just be the thing for you. If you don’t own a Fujifilm camera, consider picking one up. Download the Fuji X Weekly App. Select a few Film Simulation Recipes to try. Let your RAW editor subscription expire.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-E4 in black:  Amazon   B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-E4 in silver:  Amazon   B&H  Moment

The 10 Best Film Simulation Recipes on the Fuji X Weekly App

Fujifilm X-E4 + Fujinon 90mm f/2 + Kodachrome 64 Film Simulation Recipe

“I’m new to Fujifilm,” I’ve heard about 20 times over the last two weeks or so. “Which Film Simulation Recipes are the best?”

With over 250 (and quickly approaching 300!) Film Simulation Recipes on the Fuji X Weekly App, it can be difficult to know which to use. There are so many to choose from! This, of course, is a good problem to have, but a problem nonetheless—especially for those new to Fujifilm cameras and recipes. Where do you start? Which recipes should you try first? Which are the best?

Best is a subjective term, and what I might like best you might not. One person’s favorite might be another’s least favorite. I cannot tell you what you will like, but I can suggest recipes that you might like, because these are recipes that I like. The list below are some Film Simulation Recipes that I believe are the best. Your opinion of them might vary, and that’s just fine because we each have our own tastes and styles. Aside from these, there were probably 25 others that I strongly considered choosing, and I had to reluctantly skip. If your favorite didn’t make this list, please let me know in a comment; if one of these is a favorite of yours, let me know that, too!

If you haven’t yet downloaded the Fuji X Weekly App, be sure to do so for free today!

The 10 Best Film Simulation Recipes on the Fuji X Weekly App

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, but becoming a Patron subscriber unlocks the best App experience. There are several Patron benefits, including Filtering the Film Simulation Recipes by camera or sensor, film simulation, color or B&W, and more. Patrons can Star their favorite recipes and use Colored Stars to organize them into groups. Also, Patrons get early-access to some new recipes months before anyone else (currently, as of this writing, there 13 Early-Access Recipes on the App). Besides all of that, Patrons financially support the work of this website, and it’s a great way to assist current and future projects.

See also: Which Film Simulation Recipes, When?

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-E4 in black:  Amazon   B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-E4 in silver:  Amazon   B&H  Moment
Fujinon 90mm f/2: Amazon   B&H  Moment

Vintage Cinema — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe

Glimpse of a Fleeting Memory – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Vintage Cinema”

I recently binge-watched a number of classic movies from the 1950’s, and I was really inspired by their picture aesthetics. After some research, I discovered that Kodak ECN 5248 25T motion picture film was used in several of these flicks. The problem, of course, with trying to replicate the look of a motion picture film stock is that not only is the aesthetic dependent on the usual factors of how shot and developed, but also on the lighting and filters used, which can be different movie-to-movie and even scene-to-scene. Instead of attempting to mimic the look of any particular movie or cinema film stock, I wanted to create a certain feel or mood—a “memory color” reminiscent of color movies from the 1950’s.

This Vintage Cinema Film Simulation Recipe is a Fuji X Weekly App Patron Early-Access recipe, which means if you are an App Patron, you have access to it right now. The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes, such as this one. These Patron Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App, so I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

Ball on a Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Vintage Cinema”

The Vintage Cinema Film Simulation Recipe, which is the very first Patron Early-Access Recipe for X-Trans V, is only compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S (and I’m sure the X-S20 when it’s released this spring). I assume that the GFX100S and GFX50S II can also use this recipe, but that it will render slightly different—I don’t have either of those cameras to test it to know for certain. This recipe is best for sunny daylight conditions, and seems especially well-suited for golden hour photography, but can sometimes produce interesting results in cloudy, shade, and indoor situations, too. I believe this recipe would pair especially well with vintage lenses and probably diffusion filters, but for these pictures I used Fujinon lenses, including the 27mm f/2.8, 35mm f/2, 90mm f/2, and 100-400mm, without any filters.

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Vintage Cinema” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Birds of a Feather – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Flipped Reflection – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Three Ducks in a Lake – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Bougainvillea Blooms & Blue – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Bougainvillea Beams – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Side Gate Cracked Open – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Bougainvillea Bush in Bloom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Hanging Bougainvillea Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Desert Bunny – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Jo on a Dirt Path – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Jo on the Patio – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Late Autumn Yellow – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Leafless Tree – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Do Not Enter When Flooded – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Dry Leaves on a Patio Chair – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Pruner & Gloves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Fruit – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H  Moment

CineStill 400D v1 — A Fujifilm X-Trans IV & V Film Simulation Recipe

Illumination in the Dark Desert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “CineStill 400D v1”

CineStill 400D is a cinematic color negative film meant for C41 processing that’s been around for less than a year. Unlike other cinematic films, the “D” doesn’t apparently stand for “Daylight” (even though it is Daylight balanced), but “Dynamic” because it has a large latitude for push processing. I’ve had a number of requests to create a Film Simulation Recipe that mimics the aesthetic of CineStill 400D. The problem I encountered is that this emulsion has a lot more variance than most films. All films can produce different looks depending on a host of factors, including how shot, developed, and scanned, but CineStill 400D seems especially so. As I understand, this film “scans flat” and some degree of post-processing is necessary, which likely accounts for some of that variance, as each photographer will manipulate the file to their own tastes to produce a final image.

No one recipe will ever come close to replicating all of the possible aesthetics from CineStill 400D, so instead I will publish a series of CineStill 400D Film Simulation Recipes, each a facsimile of a different look produced by the film. This recipe—CineStill 400D v1—has more contrast and leans more green/yellow than the other versions that will follow. I think it is especially well suited for sunny daylight conditions, but it is also a good option for dreary overcast days. While it is certainly usable for many genres of photography, I particularly appreciate this one for landscapes.

Bougainvillea Warm – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “CineStill 400D v1”

This CineStill 400D v1 Film Simulation Recipe is compatible with “newer” Fujifilm X-Trans IV cameras—X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II—and all X-Trans V models—as of this writing, X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S. Unfortunately, it is not compatible with the X-T3 and X-T30. Those with newer GFX models should be able to use it, too, but the rendering will be slightly different (try it anyway). Click here for the CineStill 400D v2 recipe.

Film Simulation: Astia
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Strong
White Balance: Fluorescent 1, -6 Red & -3 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +3
Shadow: +1
Color: +2
Sharpness: -2

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -4
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “CineStill 400D v1” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Red Pipe – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dreary Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Raindrop on Curled Leaf – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Fujifilm X100V on a Wet Table – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Autumn Sidewalk – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Suburban Bush – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Reflection on the Floor – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dog Waste – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Stone Blooms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Tree in the Cloudy Desert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Suburban Stop Sign – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Joy – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Saguaro Storm – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Reflecting on Perspective – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Evening in the Desert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Cactus Reflected – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Light & Clouds on Mountain Ridges – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Sunset Clouds – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Desert in Shadow & Light – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Last Sunlight Pouring Through a Pass – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Saguaro Fingers – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dark Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Cactus in Golden Light – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H  Moment

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Vintage Bronze — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Autumn Rainbow – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Vintage Bronze”

This Vintage Bronze Film Simulation Recipe was an accident. It came about when Fuji X Weekly reader Dan Allen was first trying Anders Lindborg‘s Ilford FP4 Plus 125 recipe, and he accidentally selected the Eterna Bleach Bypass film sim instead of Monochrome. The results were pretty interesting, with a vintage alternative-process aesthetic—which I happened to really like—so I decided to make it an official recipe.

The Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulation is intended to replicate the look of motion picture film that has had the bleach step reduced or skipped. With this Vintage Bronze Film Simulation Recipe, there are some similarities to that (Michael Radford’s 1984 comes to mind), but it also reminds me a little of Kodak ColorPlus film cross-processed in E6 chemistry. Obviously, it’s not modeled after any specific film or process, so any similarities are simply happy accidents. I don’t think this recipe is necessarily a close facsimile to bleach-bypassed motion picture film or cross-processed ColorPlus, and not really an exact match to anything that I have seen, but it’s in the general neighborhood of those alternative-process aesthetics. I think an argument could be made that Kodacolor that’s faded a little is also somewhat similar.

Paperflowers – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Vintage Bronze”

Because of the blue color rendering difference between X-Trans IV and V, this Vintage Warm Film Simulation Recipe is only compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-T5, X-H2, and X-H2S. You can use it on those X-Trans IV cameras with Eterna Bleach Bypass, but the rendering will be slightly different (give it a try anyway). I assume that the GFX100S and GFX50S II can also use this recipe, but that it will render slightly different—I don’t have either of those cameras to test it to know for certain.

Film Simulation: Eterna Bleach Bypass
Grain Effect: Weak, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome FX Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, +6 Red & -8 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: 0
Shadow: -1
Color: 0
Sharpness: -2

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -2
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: -2/3 to 0 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Vintage Bronze” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Sunset Over White Truck – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Ford Wagon – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
5 & 6 – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Cart Lock – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Bus – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Jon in December – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Johanna & Lens Flare – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Outdoor Lightbulbs – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Projector – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Abstract Snow – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Christmas Song – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Winter Guitar – Surprise, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
A Gift For You – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Joy, Unsure – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Reading the Paper in December – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Sprinkled Donut – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Softdrinks – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Rudolph – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H  Moment
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H  Moment

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Fujifilm X-M1 (X-Trans I) FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Reminiscent Print

Bougainvillea Day – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Reminiscent Print”

This Film Simulation Recipe came about as an experiment after reading that film photographers weren’t meant to like the Provia film simulation because they’d find it to be too hard. So, I thought, maybe that’s true, and perhaps I can make it less hard and more, something that film photographers might find to be “just right” (as Fujifilm put it). It took some trial-and-error, but I do believe that I have succeeded! This is a much, much better “standard” setting than default Provia, and, if you have a background in film photography, you’ll appreciate this recipe.

I find this new recipe to be reminiscent of cheap color negative film shot in point-‘n’-shoot cameras and printed at a one-hour lab, probably on Fujicolor Crystal Archive paper. It’s not intended to resemble that, but to me it does. I’m reminded of the 4″ x 6″ prints from 20+ years ago that are sitting in a box in the closet, or are carefully arranged in a photo album at my parent’s house. That’s why I call it Reminiscent Print.

Classic Car Denim – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1 – “Reminiscent Print”

This new Reminiscent Print Patron Early-Access recipe is compatible the Fujifilm X-Pro1, X-E1, and X-M1 cameras. Those with X-Trans II and Bayer cameras can also use it, although the results will be just a little different. If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, it’s available to you right now on the App!

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes. These Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App, so I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Reminiscent Print” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-M1:

Pier Post – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Light & Water – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Fine Morning for Fishing – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Line in the Lake – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Pier Reflections – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1 – Photo by Jonathan Roesch
Better Days Behind – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Church Bells – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Unlit Canopy – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Red Bougainvillea Blossoms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Backyard Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Autumn Orange – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Oranges – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Bucket Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Pink Rose Bud – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Peace & Minecraft – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Ball Toss – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
All the World’s a Stage – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Steps – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Outside Tables – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Made With Passion – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Duster Headlamp – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Radial G/T – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1
Rear Duster – Goodyear, AZ – Fujifilm X-M1

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Pacific Blues — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Up or Down – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Pacific Blues”

I published the Pacific Blues Film Simulation Recipe just four months ago, and it has already become one of the most popular on Fuji X Weekly. The aesthetic is intended to emulate Lucy Laucht‘s Spirit of Summer series, particularly the Positano Blues photographs. While it is intended for a summer day at the beach, the recipe works great for many different subjects and situations. Foggy mornings? Yes! Dreary overcast? Yep! Desert landscapes? Sure! Garden flowers? Autumn leaves? Dramatic portraits? Absolutely. And lots, lots more. I’ve even seen some really interesting night photographs with it. Try this recipe for many different light scenarios and different subjects—you’re bound to love it!

Pacific Blues was made for X-Trans IV cameras, and I discovered that a slight tweak is needed for X-Trans V models, because the new sensor renders blues just a little deeper on some film simulations. For X-Trans IV recipes that use Classic Negative, Classic Chrome, Eterna, or Eterna Bleach Bypass and calls for Color Chrome FX Blue Strong, you’ll need to adjust it to Weak on X-Trans V; if it calls for Color Chrome FX Blue Weak, you need to adjust it to Off. If it calls for Color Chrome FX Blue Off, well, you just have to know it will render differently on X-Trans V and there’s nothing you can do about it. For Pacific Blues, setting it to Weak instead of Strong makes it compatible with X-Trans V.

Misty Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Pacific Blues”

If you have an X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, or X-T30 II, you’ll want to use the original Pacific Blues Film Simulation Recipe. For those with an X-T3 or X-T30, unfortunately Fujifilm never gave your camera the Classic Negative film simulation, so you cannot use Pacific Blues. For those with GFX, if it’s an older model, I think the X-Trans IV version is likely most compatible, and for newer models, this version is likely most compatible; however, I have not tested either version on any GFX model to know for sure. If you have an X-H2, X-H2S, or X-T5 (or any other X-Trans V camera that is released after publication), this is the Pacific Blues recipe that you want to use.

Film Simulation: Classic Negative
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Weak
White Balance: 5800K, +1 Red & -3 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: +3
Color: +4
Sharpness: -2

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: -3
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Pacific Blues” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Minolta Garden – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Ground Leaves – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Wet Lightbulb – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Flower in the Rain – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Wet Red Rosebud – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Wet Red Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Afternoon Bougainvillea – Bcukeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Illuminated Branch – Buckeye, AZ Fujifilm X-T5
Spiderwebs – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Desert Cactus – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Misty Morning Desert – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Foggy Tree – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Neighborhood Fog – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Autumn Walkway – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Lifting Clouds Over Veiled Ridge – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

See also:
Fujifilm X-Trans V Film Simulation Recipes
Fujifilm X-Trans IV Film Simulation Recipes

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

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Kodachrome 64 — Fujifilm X-T5 (X-Trans V) Film Simulation Recipe

Pilot – Cordes Lakes, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodachrome 64”

This isn’t a new Film Simulation Recipe; it’s simply a slight modification of my Kodachrome 64 recipe for X-Trans IV cameras to make it compatible with X-Trans V models. The adjustments are pretty simple: set Color Chrome FX Blue to Off and Shadow to +0.5. Why the Color Chrome FX Blue adjustment? I discovered that with Classic Chrome (and some other film simulations), X-Trans V cameras render blue deeper. Why the change to Shadow? I stated in the X-Trans IV version, “I would set Shadow to +0.5 if I were using these settings on [a] camera [with that option].” With those two modifications, the Kodachrome 64 recipe is ready for your Fujifilm X-Trans V camera!

Kodachrome was a brand-name of color reversal film made by Kodak between 1935 and 2009. There were three eras of Kodachrome: 1935-1960, 1961-1973, and 1974-2009. Each era produced a slightly different look, and the third era is the one you’re probably most familiar with. This recipe is intended to mimic the aesthetic of the third era of Kodachrome, specifically the ISO 64 emulsion.

Arizona Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5 – “Kodachrome 64”

This Kodachrome 64 Film Simulation Recipe is intended for Fujifilm X-Trans V models, which (as of this writing) include the X-H2, X-H2S, and X-T5 cameras. It’s compatible with newer GFX models too, but will likely render slightly different on those cameras. Those with an X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, or X-T30 II, try the Kodachrome 64 recipe for those models (click here). Those with an X-T3 or X-T30, try the Kodachrome 64 recipe for those cameras (click here). For those with an X-Trans II model, there’s a Kodachrome 64 recipe for you, too (click here).

Film Simulation: Classic Chrome
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome FX Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, +2 Red & -5 Blue
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +0.5
Color: +2
Sharpness: +1

High ISO NR: -4
Clarity: +3
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Kodachrome 64” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-T5:

Palm Tree Closeup – Palo Verde, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Abandoned Mobile Home – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Store & Bar – Hassayampi, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Narrow Bridge – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Concrete Railroad Ties & Steel Bridge – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Gillespie Dam – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Gila River Reeds – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Flag, Bell, Cross – Arlington, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Princess Garden – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Secret Garden – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Blossomed Garden Rose – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Farm Truck – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Wall Shadow & Empty Pot – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Dusk Lamp – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Girl on Swing – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5
Desert Sunset – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T5

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T5 in black:  Amazon  B&H
Fujifilm X-T5 in silver:  Amazon  B&H

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

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Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Chrome Slide

Airstream – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Chrome Slide”

This Film Simulation Recipe is a bit of a mystery to me. I recently found it in my C1-C7 custom presets on my Fujifilm X-E4, simply named Exp. After shooting with it, I quickly remembered that I had created it back in July, and then for some unknown reason stopped using it. In the weeks and months that passed, I somehow completely forgot all about it. Here’s what I do know: while I was traveling over the summer, someone had asked me to create a certain look, which I believe was of a particular photographer and not a specific film stock (although I am not fully certain of that), and so I did, but now I have no idea who asked (because I get many requests) or who the photographer was that I was attempting to mimic. I’m not sure if I was close to successful or not, as I don’t really remember a whole lot of anything about it. I did find on an SD card the pictures that I had captured with the recipe over the summer. I began using it again just recently, and I really appreciate the results—I think many of you might, too. In fact, it could be a new favorite recipe for some of you!

While I don’t believe that this recipe was modeled after any specific film stock, it does remind me a little of Ektachrome. Over the years there have been around 40 different emulsions that Kodak has given the brand name Ektachrome to, not to mention that one film may have had numerous updates and revisions (Ektachorme E100, for example), so it can be tough to know exactly which “Ektachrome” this might most closely resemble. Maybe E100 or E200 or even Elite Chrome? I’m certain that it’s not an exact match to any, but to me it has a general Ektachrome “memory color” (as Fujifilm puts it). Since I’m not sure what it most closely resembles, I’m simply calling it Chrome Slide.

Caution: Nature – Tonto Natural Bridge SP, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Chrome Slide”

This Film Simulation Recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. I believe that it is also compatible with X-Trans V models, such as X-H2, X-H2S, and the upcoming X-T5. Those with newer GFX cameras should be able to use it, too, although it will render slightly differently. Unfortunately, it is not compatible with the X-T3 or X-T30.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +1
Shadow: +1
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: 0
Clarity: +3
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Daylight, -3 Red & +1 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Chrome Slide” Film Simulation Recipe on a Fujifilm X-E4:

Patriotic Boat – Morro Bay, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Surf Rider – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Elephant Seal Along Rocky Shore – San Simeon, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Sport Bird – Avila Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Sunset Storm – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Layers & Repeated Shapes – Morro Bay, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Public Guitarist – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Billiards – Redlands, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Ice House – Avila Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Urban Bikes – Pasadena, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Pine Layers – Pine, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Small Flowers Near Tree – Tonto Natural Bridge SP, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Hexagon Waterdrops – Pine, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
October Oak – Pine, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Wet Pine – Pine, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Singular Rose Bloom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Water Falling Under The Bridge – Tonto Natural Bridge SP, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Small Waterfall – Tonto Natural Bridge SP, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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Introducing Fuji X Weekly App Widgets for iOS!

The Fuji X Weekly App now has Widgets! This can transform how you use the Fuji X Weekly App, turning your home screen into a Film Simulation Recipe launchpad!

If you have an iOS device, you now have this new feature—if your iPhone or iPad didn’t update automatically, be sure to manually do it now. Those with Android devices don’t fret, as Widgets are in the works for Android, too.

What are Widgets? Larger than app icons, Widgets give you quick access to information or provide a different way to interact with the app. Specifically to Fuji X Weekly, you now have six Widgets to choose from: Newest Recipes (one recipe), Newest Recipes (two recipes), Recipe of the Day, Selected Recipe, Recipe Detail, and The Big X.

For Newest Recipe Widget, you have two options: small and medium. The small Widget is a shortcut to the newest recipe, and displays the lead photo of the recipe, which, when tapped, will take you right to it in the Fuji X Weekly App. The medium Widget is a shortcut to the two newest recipes, displaying the lead photo of each, and will take you to whichever of the two recipes that you tap. These Widgets are excellent for those who don’t always visit the Fuji X Weekly Blog, yet want to know when a new recipe is released.

The Recipe of the Day Widget is for when you’re not sure which recipe to use. Each day a new Film Simulation Recipe is provided, and the exact recipe will be different for each user. Between this and the Random Recipe selector, you should be able to find a recipe to use whenever you find yourself stuck for one. This Widget could be incorporated into an interesting project, such as using a different recipe each day for 30 days, or something like that. Today, on my iPhone, Kodak Portra 400 v2 is my Recipe of the Day.

Next is Selected Recipe, which is my personal favorite Widget. You can have quick access to any of the over 250 recipes right on your home screen! In order to use this, you have to tap-and-hold on the Widget, then select Edit Widget, then choose the recipe you want. Tap the Widget to open the recipe in the Fuji X Weekly App.

Recipe Detail displays the parameters of a recipe in a medium-sized Widget. To set it up, you have to tap-and-hold on the Widget, then select Edit Widget, then choose the recipe you want to display. Tap the Widget to see the recipe in the App.

Finally, there’s the Big X, which is just a four-times-size Fuji X Weekly App icon, should you find the regular-sized one to be too small.

The wonderful thing about these Widgets is that you can have as many as you’d like. If you want just one, or seven, or 20—there’s no limit! My iPhone has literally been taken over by Fuji X Weekly Widgets, and it’s transformed how I interact with the App, turning my home screen into a Film Simulation Recipe launchpad.

How do you add Widgets to your iPhone? Tap-and-hold anywhere on your home screen (except directly over an app icon), which will make all of your icons wiggle. Tap the plus in the top-left corner, which opens the Widget menu. You can either scroll down to find the Fuji X Weekly App in the app list and tap on it, or simply search for Fuji X Weekly in the search bar at the top. Find the Fuji X Weekly App Widget that you want to add to your home screen, and tap Add Widget. You can move the Widget to wherever you want on your home screen. I have several pages that are nothing but Fuji X Weekly Widgets! You can also add Fuji X Weekly Widgets to the Today View screen.

Don’t have the Fuji X Weekly App? Download it for free today (Apple here, Android here)! Consider becoming a Patron to unlock the best App experience and to help support this website.

If you have an iPhone, you should also download the RitchieCam camera app for iOS (click here).

Fujifilm X100V (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Fujichrome Provia 100F

Berry Behind the Baseball Diamond – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujichrome Provia 100F”

This Film Simulation Recipe is called “Fujichrome Provia 100F” after the film that it is intended to mimic. Fujifilm introduced Provia 100, a color reversal film, in 1994, and replaced it with the much improved Provia 100F in 2001. I’ve only shot a couple of rolls of Provia 100F. I remember that it had a cool color cast (especially when compared to Kodak films), it had a fair amount of contrast, moderate saturation, and tended to render blues strongly. This recipe has been in the works for awhile, with a lot of failed attempts. I think it does pretty well at reproducing the aesthetic of the film, but there are definitely a few compromises—more of the “memory color” that Fujifilm talks about than perhaps a 100% accurate rendition. Still, I believe that it turned out pretty well overall.

You might be surprised that this recipe doesn’t use the Provia film simulation as its base, but instead uses Classic Chrome. The Provia film simulation doesn’t actually resemble very well the film that it was named after—Fujifilm used it more as a marketing name on the X series than anything else. Velvia was the Fuji slide film that I most often shot with, but Provia was probably their most popular because it wasn’t nearly as wild as Velvia, and produced more true-to-life (yet still fairly vibrant) colors.

Actual Fujicolor Provia 100F 35mm film. Chicago, 2005.

This Fujicolor Provia 100F Film Simulation Recipe has been a Patron Early-Access Recipe on the Fuji X Weekly App since January, but it has been replaced by a new Early-Access Recipe, so now it’s available to everyone. It’s compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. It should be fully compatible with X-Trans V cameras, but I’ve yet to be able to test it to know if it renders the same or not. Those with newer GFX cameras can use this recipe, too, but it will render slightly different.

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -1
Shadow: +3
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -1
Clarity: -3
Grain Effect: Weak, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Daylight, -2 Red & +5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +1 (typically)

Example photographs captured using this “Fujichrome Provia 100F” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V and Fujifilm X-E4 cameras:

Mushos for 5$ – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Truck Dodging the Sunlight – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Sunlight Pouring on Leaves in Early Autumn – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Wasatch Front – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Blue Sky Reeds – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Branch Berries – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Baseball Sky – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Windsock – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Field 3 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Skateboard & Runner – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Creek Under Branches – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Trail Through the Trees – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Fence Along Path – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V
Josh at the Court – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X100V

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There’s a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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Fujifilm X100V (X-Trans IV) FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Kodak Royal Gold 400

This Old House is now a Business – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Royal Gold 400”

This Film Simulation Recipe began as an attempt to achieve a “memory color” aesthetic of photographic prints from the 1990’s and early 2000’s; when creating this recipe I wasn’t concerned about the specific films or processes. After shooting with this recipe and reviewing the results, I was reminded of Kodak Royal Gold 400 film… sometimes. Of course, one film can produce many different aesthetics, depending on (among other things) how it was shot, developed, scanned and/or printed. Royal Gold 400 didn’t always or even usually look like this, but sometimes it did, and I found some examples in a photo-box and online that were quite similar—I’m not sure why, but my suspicion is that the film was mishandled, either from being stored improperly (possibly exposed to too much heat) or waiting too long to develop after exposing. Film can be finicky, but that serendipity is something that makes it special.

Royal Gold 400 was introduced by Kodak in 1994 as a replacement to the original Kodak Ektar 400 film. The Royal Gold line, which also came in ISO 100 and 200 versions, was marketed as a “step up” from Kodak Gold, with finer grain and more vibrant colors. It was more-or-less an updated Ektar emulsion that was renamed for marketing reasons (Gold sold a lot more than Ektar). In the early 2000’s Royal Gold was replaced by the High Definition/Royal Supra line. This Kodak Royal Gold 400 Film Simulation Recipe is a “happy accident” facsimile of one (of many) possible aesthetics from the film.

Bougainvillea Among Trumpets – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V – “Kodak Royal Gold 400”

The Fuji X Weekly app is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes. These Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App, so I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This Kodak Royal Gold 400 Film Simulation Recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. It should also be compatible with X-Trans V models, but I’ve not tested it myself to know for certain. Those with newer GFX models can use it, too, although it will render slightly different. If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, this recipe is available to you right now on the App!

Example photographs captured using this “Kodak Royal Gold 400” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Mending Blue – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Quality Auto Service – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
A-Town Garage – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Clubhouse – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
A Little Red – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
4 Sale – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Shapes – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Cactus Liquor – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Sideways Saguaro Stop – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Library – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Lock & Safe – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Going to the Dentist – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Sidewalk Bicyclist – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Red Car & Wine Bar – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Americana Icon – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Avon – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
N Recep – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Park Hoop – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Outfield – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Bougainvillea Among Trumpets 2 – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Butterfly Cage – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Pink Bloom in the Garden – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Sunlit Table Corner – Avondale, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Orange Soda Cup – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

New Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Expired ECN-2 100T

Palm Trunk & Arches – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Expired ECN-2 100T”

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes. These Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many Early-Access Recipes have been publicly published on this blog and the App, so now everyone can use them! Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

Eastman Color Negative II 100T, which was also known as ECN-2 Type 5247/7247, was a 100 ASA Tungsten-balanced motion picture film made by Kodak between 1974 and 1983 (although, apparently, it could still be found and was used into the early 1990’s). A lot of iconic movies used this film for at least some shots, including Star Wars, Back to the Future, Raiders of the Lost Ark, and many more. This Film Simulation Recipe is intended to mimic the aesthetic of this film stock that’s expired and developed in C41 chemistry after having the Remjet layer removed. This recipe isn’t intended to look like the film as it’s seen in the movies, but expired film that’s been developed in C41 chemistry instead of the ECN-2 process.

Truck Tire – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Expired ECN-2 100T”

This “Expired ECN-2 100T” Patron Early-Access Recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. I believe it will also work on the X-H2 and X-H2s cameras, although I have not tried it myself to know for certain. If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the Fuji X Weekly App! If you don’t have the App, download it for free today. A side-note: this is the 250th Film Simulation Recipe in the App!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Expired ECN-2 100T” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Saguaro Green – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Stop, All Ways – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Truck Mirror – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Lightning McQueen’s Home – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Truck – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Texting & Walking – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Bougainvillea Over Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Backlit Bougainvillea & Lens Flare – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Light Pink Blooms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Sunlit Trumpets – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Shaded Hummingbird Feeder – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Sidewalk Chalk & Red Bucket – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Red Soccer Ball – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Friendly Skeleton – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Kodak Instamatic Camera – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4

Fujifilm X-Trans IV + X-H1 FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipes: Vintage Eterna

Bougainville Branch Blossom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1 – “Vintage Eterna”
Cactus Spikes – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Vintage Eterna”

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is that you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes. These Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many Early-Access Recipes have already been publicly published on this blog and the App, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new “Vintage Eterna” Early-Access Recipe is a bit unusual in that there are actually two recipes: one for the X-H1, X-T3, and X-T30, and another for newer models (X-Pro3 and newer). The premise was simple: what would the Vintage Kodachrome recipe look like if I used Eterna instead of Classic Chrome? As it turns out, it looks alright; however, after I made more modifications, it looks much better! I initially created this on my Fujifilm X-E4, but then I wanted a version for my X-H1, so I made a recipe compatible with that camera, and even used it on my X-T30. If you have an X-H1 or any X-Trans IV camera, you can use the “Vintage Eterna” recipe—just find the one that’s compatible with your model. For those with the X-H2s (or soon-to-be X-H2), you can use the version of this recipe that’s for the newer X-Trans IV cameras, and it should render pretty much identically on X-Trans V, but I haven’t tried it myself to know for certain. If you have a GFX camera, one of these two recipes will work on the model you have, but it will render slightly differently (try it anyway, though).

If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, it’s available to you right now on the App!

Fujifilm X-H1, X-T3, & X-T30 — “Vintage Eterna”

Cloud Above Roof – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Summer Blossoms – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Sky Vines – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Backlit Leaves of Summer – Fujifilm X-H1
Hummingbird Feeder – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Golden Trumpets – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Yellow Trumpet Flower – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Red Trumpet Flower – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-H1
Garden Wall Light – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-T30

Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, & X-T30 II — “Vintage Eterna”

Labyrinth – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Sky Dome – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Little Desert Berries – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Saguaro & Storm – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Birdie Footprints – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Distant Downtown – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Sky Rays – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Saguaro Silhouette – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Purple Plant – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4

Fujifilm X-Trans IV FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Vintage Print

Bell Tower – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Vintage Print”

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is that you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes. These Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many Early-Access Recipes have been publicly published on this blog and the App, so now everyone can use them! Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This recipe began when my wife suggested that I should try to emulate a certain look that she found. I wasn’t successful, but in my efforts I discovered these settings, which I thought looked interesting nonetheless. They remind me of vintage color prints—not from any specific film or process, but just my “memory color” (as Fujifilm puts it) of some old prints that I’ve seen in the past. It has almost a classic magazine quality to it, or even a bit of a post-card resemblance. Whatever it may or may not look like, it definitely has a vintage-like look that some of you might really appreciate.

All of these pictures were captured using manual vintage lenses, including—actually, mostly—a Helios 44-2. I also used a 5% CineBloom or 10% CineBloom filter with around half of them. I did this to help achieve an analog aesthetic. The use of vintage glass and diffusion filters aren’t required for this recipe, but you are certainly welcome to do so if you want—I think they help a little to take the digital edge off of the pictures.

Suburban Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Vintage Print”

This “Vintage Print” Early-Access Recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras. Those with the X-H2s and newer GFX cameras can use it, too (results may vary, though). If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, it’s available to you right now on the Fuji X Weekly App! If you don’t have the App, download it for free today.

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Vintage Print” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Big Storm Looming in the Background – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Lake, House – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Jon Is Happy – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Labyrinth Church – Litchfield Park, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Saguaro & Dust – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Twin Saguaros – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Saguaro as Seen Through a Saguaro – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Teddy Bear Cholla – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Desert Spikes – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Desert Barrel – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Trumpets Down – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Bright Bougainvillea – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4

Fujifilm X-E4 (X-Trans IV) FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Eterna Bleach Bypass

Evening on Main – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Eterna Bleach Bypass”

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes. These early-access recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many early-access recipes have already been publicly published on this blog and the App, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

I was challenged by Thomas Schwab to create a Film Simulation Recipe that mimics the aesthetic of the picture in the background of Dan Bailey’s YouTube video discussing the Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulation. There were some challenges, including limited samples (which were viewed on a YouTube video), and the fact that I now live in Arizona and not Utah (no access to majestic snow-capped mountain scenes), but I do believe that I got in the ballpark. This is essentially a “black-and-white” recipe for color photography—capable of producing dramatic near-monochrome images.

Pacific Photographer – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4

Because this “Eterna Bleach Bypass” recipe uses the Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulation, it is only compatible with those cameras that have it, which are the Fujifilm X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II. I do believe that this recipe is fully compatible with X-Trans V (currently the X-H2s), but I have not tested it yet to know for certain. Those with newer GFX cameras can also use it, although it will likely render slightly different.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly Patron, this recipe is available to you right now on the App!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Eterna Bleach Bypass” on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Suburban Roof Abstract – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
CVS – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Climbing a Wall – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Wall Details – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Bougainvillea & Building Storm – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Clouds Above Mesa – St. George, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Crashing Wave Along Coast – San Simeon, CA – Fujifilm X-E4
Backyard Garden Sunbeams – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Garden Trumpet – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Little Bug – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Saguaro Fingers – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Boardwalking – Pismo Beach, CA – Fujifilm X-E4

Random Recipe Challenge: 10 Frames with LomoChrome Metropolis

The Fuji X Weekly App has a brand-new feature that’s super fun: Random Recipe! When you tap the criss-crossed arrows at the top-right, the App will randomly select a Film Simulation Recipe for you.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron and you have various Filters selected (such as Filter by Camera, Filter by Film Simulation, Filter by B&W, etc.), the Random Recipe selector will only choose from the list of filtered recipes, so you can have it select from what is compatible with your camera. In my case, I chose “Filter by X-E4” prior to tapping the Random Recipe selector, so only the recipes compatible with the X-E4 were considered.

Here’s a fun way to use this new feature: the Random Recipe Challenge! The rules are 1) use the App to select a Random Recipe for you⁠—whatever it selects you have to use (if you are not a Patron and the App chooses a non-compatible recipe, you can try again until it lands on a recipe that is compatible with your camera)⁠—and 2) shoot with this recipe for 24 or 36 frames (your choice), like it’s a roll of film, before changing recipes. If you post to Instagram, use the hashtag #fxwrandomrecipechallenge. I hope that you have a lot of fun with the Random Recipe Challenge, and I can’t wait to see what you capture!

When I tapped the Random Recipe icon, the App chose for me the LomoChrome Metropils Film Simulation Recipe. I shot 36 frames with this recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4 with a Vivitar 135mm f/2.8 lens attached to it. Below are my favorite 10 pictures of the 36 frames. Enjoy!

Lather – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm
Malnatis Pizzeria – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm
Cheese ‘n Stuff – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm
Local – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm
Umbrella – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm
Empty Hummingbird Feeder – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm
Daylight Bulb – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm
Tree Leaves – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm
Spraying Water – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm
Palm Tree Top – Gilbert, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4 & Vivitar 135mm

Find the LomoChrome Metropolis Film Simulation Recipe and over 200 others on the Fuji X Weekly App! Don’t have the App? Download it for free today! Become a Patron to unlock the best App experience.

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-E4 Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X-E4 Silver   Amazon   B&H

New Fujifilm X-Trans IV FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Magenta Negative

Flag & Dome – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Magenta Negative”

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes. These Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many Early-Access Recipes have already been publicly published on this Blog and the App, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This Film Simulation Recipe is intended to mimic the use of a Magenta Color Correction Filter, such as the Tiffen CC30M, which reduces the intensity of green, and is used to combat green color casts. Back in the film days, using Color Correction Filters was common, but it is much less so now, since you can dial in very precise white balance adjustments for whatever the light is; however, you can still use these filters if you want to. Instead of using a magenta filter, you can use this recipe.

Because this recipe uses Classic Negative, it has a generic Fujicolor Superia aesthetic; however, it is not meant to precisely mimic any specific Superia emulsion. The inspiration actually came from a YouTube video by Cammackey, entitled Fujifilm X100V Recipes / Old Film Tricks. While this recipe is a little different than his, it is intended to produce similar results, just without the need of a Color Correction Filter, which his recipe requires. This “Magenta Negative” Film Simulation Recipe is compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, it’s available to you right now on the App! Don’t have the App? Download it for free today! Become a Patron to unlock the best App experience and gain early access to this recipe.

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Magenta Negative” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Wet Red Rose – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Flowers by a Rock Wall – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Waterfall in the Ozarks – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Staircase Waterfall – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Unexpected Canyon – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Chapel & Cannon – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Pine Above Rooftop – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Magnolia Flag – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Ozark – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Little Cloud – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Plaza – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Window View – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Spiderweb on a Window – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Abandoned Porch Seats – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Tree Prism – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Ford & Tree Shadows – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Steampunk Art – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4

New: Fuji X Weekly App Update!!

I just published an update to the Fuji X Weekly App! If your device didn’t update the App automatically, be sure to manually do so right now.

What’s in this update?

First is Search. You now have the ability to search for Film Simulation Recipes! This new feature allows you to search for recipes by name to more quickly locate the exact one that you are looking for. If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, the search feature works in conjunction with Filter, so (for example) if you Filter By Camera, only those recipes compatible with your camera will appear when you Search. In other words, all App users get Search, but this feature is even better for Patrons. The ability to search for recipes is a significant improvement⁠—it definitely makes the App more user friendly. On Apple, simply scroll up (drag the recipe list down) and Search will appear towards the top. On Android, tap the magnify glass icon at the top-right and Search will appear.

Next is Random Recipe selector. Not sure which Film Simulation Recipe to use? Let the Fuji X Weekly App decide for you! Tap the crossing arrows icon at the top-right, and the App will randomly select one for you to use. The Random Recipe selector also works in conjunction with Filter, so even though it’s available to everyone, it’s even better if you are an App Patron. This fun new feature is addicting! If you’re in a photographic rut, this might help you get out of it. If there are a couple of you out photographing together, you can make a game out of it. I personally have really enjoyed using the Random Recipe selector, and I think you will, too!

Last but not least, the recipe parameter order has been improved. Unfortunately, the order of settings is different depending on your camera model, and even on the same model the order can be different within the IQ menu vs Custom Settings menu, so it’s not possible for it to be perfect; however, I do believe that the new order will make it a bit easier to program recipes into your camera.

This Fuji X Weekly App update is intended to make recipes easier to find and program, plus add a little fun to the experience. I hope that you find it useful and enjoyable!

Don’t have the Fuji X Weekly App? Download it today!

Not a Fuji X Weekly App Patron? Consider subscribing to unlock the best App experience! Within the App, tap the Gear icon, then select Become A Patron.

New Fujifilm X-Trans IV FXW App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe: Expired Velvia

Red Blossom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4 – “Expired Velvia”

The Fuji X Weekly App is free, yet becoming a Fuji X Weekly Patron unlocks the best App experience! One benefit of being a Patron is you get early access to some new Film Simulation Recipes. These Early-Access Recipes will eventually become available free to everyone in time, including this new one. In fact, many Early-Access Recipes have already been publicly published on this Blog and the App, so now everyone can use them. Patrons help support Fuji X Weekly and, really, without them there would be no App. So I want to give a special “thank you” to all of the Patrons!

This new “Expired Velvia” Fuji X Weekly App Patron Early-Access Film Simulation Recipe came about after a Fuji X Weekly reader shared with me some photographs that he had captured on long-expired Velvia 50 color reversal film. He didn’t have the lab adjust the development time for the expired film, so they were all underexposed; however, they turned out really interesting, with an aesthetic that leaned more towards Superia than Velvia. I think this recipe does a great job of mimicking that look. If you are searching for a Film Simulation Recipe that’s a little different, this is one to try! It’s definitely not for everyone, but some of you will love it. It’s compatible with the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II cameras.

If you are a Fuji X Weekly App Patron, it’s available to you right now on the App!

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Expired Velvia” Film Simulation Recipe on my Fujifilm X-E4:

Light Post – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Hotel Door – Flagstaff, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Restaurant – Flagstaff, AZ – Fujifilm X-E4
Webs We Weave – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Outdoor Chair Cushion – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Jo Playing with Roly Polies – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
A Boy & His Fishing Pole – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Covered Boat Dock – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Lake Houses – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
‘Bout to Blossom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-E4
Wet Rose – Ridgedale, MO – Fujifilm X-E4
Triangles – Hot Springs, AR – Fujifilm X-E4
Fenced Sun – Amarillo, TX – Fujifilm X-E4
A Whale of a Sunset – Branson, MO – Fujifilm X-E4