Fujifilm X-Trans I Film Simulation Recipe: Color Negative Film

Pink Roses – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Color Negative Film”

This Fujifilm X-Trans I film simulation recipe was the first that I created after getting my nine-year-old X-Pro1 camera in the mail. It wasn’t intended to mimic the look of any particular film. I was trying to create a good-looking recipe with a white balance shift inspired by my Fujicolor 100 Industrial recipe. It has a wonderful print film aesthetic, perhaps Kodak-like, that looks especially nice in sunny conditions. I call this recipe “Color Negative Film” because of that generic color negative film quality.

If you are a Patron on the Fuji X Weekly App, you’ve had early access to this recipe since May. A different recipe has replaced it, so if you are a Patron, look for that new early-access recipe in the app! For those who are not Patrons, this recipe is now available to you. If you have a Fujifilm X-Pro1, X-E1, or X-M1, this recipe is compatible with your camera.

Diesel Cash Price – Park City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1 – “Color Negative Film”

If you have a Fujifilm Bayer camera, I invite you to try this recipe on your camera, although results will be a little different. Technically, X-Trans II cameras can use it, too, although it definitely won’t look the same—maybe you’ll like it, maybe you won’t. If you have an X-Trans I camera, this is a must-try recipe that many of you are sure to love!

Provia
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +2 (High)
Shadow: +2 (High)
Color: -2 (Low)
Sharpness: -1 (Medium-Low)
Noise Reduction: -2 (Low)
White Balance: 3000K, +8 Red & -9 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 3200
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs captured using this “Color Negative Film” recipe:

Rising Up – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Red Leaves of Summer – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Backlit White Blossom – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Yellow Bench – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Tiny Fruit – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Blackberry Forest – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Building Mountain Storm – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Dead Stump – Farmington Bay, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Log Bridge – Salt Lake City, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1
Cone Closed – Weber Canyon, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro1

Find these film simulation recipes and many more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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5 comments

  1. Pingback: Reblog from Fuji X Weekly : Fujifilm X-Trans I (X-Pro1 + X-E1) Film Simulation Recipe: Kodachrome II – Open Source Photography
  2. Jörg · 30 Days Ago

    I’ve tried this recipe on my X-T10 (and I like it somehow) but I don’t have a X-Trans I camera to compare. When you say that on a X-Trans II camera it would look totally different, what exactly do you mean? Different in which way? What would I need to change to get the same look (more or less) on my X-T10?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ritchie Roesch · 30 Days Ago

      So X-Trans II is a little warmer than X-Trans I. I think Highlight, Shadow and Color render slightly differently, too, but only by a very minor amount. The biggest difference is White Balance. If you like the warmer results on your X-T10, then I say go with it! If you want it to be more similar to X-Trans I, I would think a WB Shift of perhaps +7 Red & -7 Blue should be close (although I have not experimented with that to verify it).

      Like

      • Jörg · 29 Days Ago

        Thank you Ritchie! That’s exactly what I thought as well when I saw the photos shot with this recipe… too warm or at least warmer than your example photographs. Will give it try with the R +7 & B -7 WB shift. I definitely like the overall look of this recipe.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Ritchie Roesch · 29 Days Ago

        Awesome! Let me know how it goes.

        Like

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