Fujifilm X100V (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Fujicolor 100 Gold

Morning Mist – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor 100 Gold

I get asked frequently to create Film Simulation Recipes that mimic the aesthetic of a certain film stock or the look of a particular photographer. In this case, it was the look of a specific photographer that I was asked to recreate. After viewing this person’s images, I thought that they had a lot of similarities with my Kodak Gold 200 recipe except with Superia greens and reds. So I programmed that recipe into my Fujifilm X100V, except with Classic Negative instead of Classic Chrome, plus I made a couple of small modifications. After testing it out, I felt that it produced pictures that were, in fact, quite similar to the photographer’s look. A few days went by, and by chance I stumbled upon some photographs captured with Fujicolor 100 film, and they looked pretty similar to this new recipe. After digging a little deeper, I found some more Fujicolor 100 pictures, and in the description of a few that seemed particularly similar, the photographer mentioned that they used an 81A warming filter.

I’ve heard it said that Fujifilm has historically saved their “best” films for Japan. Indeed, there are Fuji emulsions that, for whatever reasons, aren’t sold outside their home country. Fujicolor 100 is a one of those. I don’t know a whole lot about it (or if it is even still manufactured), but it is a consumer-grade color negative film. I believe that it’s a little warmer than most Fujicolor stocks, but that could also be a result of a warming filter, lens used, how shot, how developed, and/or how scanned, so I’m not completely certain of it. I didn’t model this recipe after Fujicolor 100, but it does seem at times to resemble it surprisingly closely.

Gated Camera Store – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V – “Fujicolor 100 Gold”

Because this Fujicolor 100 Gold Film Simulation Recipe uses the Classic Negative film simulation, it’s not compatible with the Fujifilm X-T3 or X-T30, or any other camera without Classic Negative. It is intended for the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10, X-E4, and X-T30 II models. Because X-Trans V renders blue deeper, if you use it on an X-T5, X-H2, or X-H2S it will look slightly different, which you might like or dislike or be indifferent to—give it a try and see what you think.

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: -2
Shadow: +1
Color: +3
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpness: -2
Clarity: -2
Grain Effect: Strong, Small
Color Chrome Effect: Off
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Off
White Balance: Daylight, +4 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +2/3 to +1 1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Fujicolor 100 Gold” Film Simulation Recipe on a Fujifilm X100V:

Foto Forum – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Gas Station Turned Diner – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
American Shooting Experience – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
66 Gifts – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Hot Hare – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Someday Sony – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
One of These is Not Like the Others – Phoenix, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Self Reflection – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Confused Santa – Williams, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Look at this Flower – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Girl by a Fountain – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Water Feature – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Fujifilm X-T5 in a Plant – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
A Pink Bloom – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Garden Trumpets – Buckeye, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Small Boats at a Dock – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Seven Mile Gulch – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X100V
Log in the Water – Lynx Lake, AZ – Fujifilm X100V

Find this Film Simulation Recipe and over 250 more on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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8 comments

  1. TheCameraEatsFirst · November 30

    Nice one! Saved the recipe for next outing!

    I’ve been using your other recipes (classic Kodak, santacolor, color negative 400, Kodachrome 25 and many more) but Pacific Blues has not been changed since you posted it!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ritchie Roesch · November 30

      Pacific Blues is a special recipe, I think. Thanks for the feedback!

      Like

  2. othellocacatian · December 4

    thank you so m much for the beautiful film sim Ritchie, recently I’ve been experimenting and working on the camera setting(XPRO3) and the filmsims and trying to come with a portra look film sim be it 400 or 800, but with classic negative as the base films not the classic chrome, and I think with this one , you’ve just nailed it. I almost dive in with your fuji pro 400 H , but I think this one is much more closer to what ive been thinking of and looking for, thank you so much again Ritchie, iL be hasgtagging you pretty soon in my Instagram postings., sending our(ME,my WIFEY and LiL Z) love here to you and your family,

    foto d othello here from palm springs Ca,

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ritchie Roesch · December 5

      Awesome! So glad that you like it. Seems like it could be a good film sim for the Salton Sea….

      Like

  3. othello · December 6

    yes I like it, I tried it out today, its like a fusion of classic negative and the classic chrome ,I like the green and the reds. yup yarryt,,its been a while since I’ve been to saltonsea, can’t wait to go there, hopefully this week, thanks a lot again Ritchie,

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Stephanie · December 10

    So cool! So once we put the setting on our camera, how do we save it? So it can be readily accessible? Sorry, I’m a newbie!

    Like

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