My White Balance Shift Solution

As you know, my film simulation recipes rely heavily on white balance shifts. Unfortunately, you cannot save white balance shifts with custom presets. You can only save one white balance shift for each white balance type in the White Balance Menu. In other words, whatever shift you set for auto white balance will be applied to all custom presets that use auto white balance. If all of your C1-C7 presets in the Q menu use the same white balance, one white balance shift will be applied to all of them. For many people, this means that whenever you change recipes you’re also having to adjust the white balance shift, which is a pain sometimes.

The Fujifilm X-Pro3 doesn’t have this problem from what I’ve heard. You can save unique white balance shifts with each preset in the Q menu. You can set it and forget it! There’s a decent chance that this ability will be added to the X-T3 and X-T30 via a firmware update at some point, but right now the X-Pro3 is the only camera that can do this. There’s an outside chance that X-Trans III cameras could also be given this feature, but most likely not. Don’t fret! I do have a solution. There’s a simple work-around that might make things much easier for you.

The issue is that only one white balance shift can be saved per white balance, but in that statement lies the answer! What you need are presets that use different white balances. Or you can have presets that use the same white balance and the same white balance shift. What do I mean?

So you have custom slots C1 through C7, right? Maybe you use all seven of them for color. Or maybe you set aside one or two for black-and-white, in which case white balance and white balance shift may or may not be important. For each color preset you simply use a film simulation recipe with a different white balance. If each recipe uses a different white balance, then you can set the shift for that recipe and you’re good to go. It will always be set to that unless you decided to change it.

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For example, you could have Kodachrome II, which uses auto white balance, set to C1, Kodacolor, which uses a kelvin white balance, set to C2, Kodachrome 64, which uses daylight white balance, set to C3, Lomography Color 100, which uses cloudy/shade white balance, set to C4, Color Negative, which uses fluorescent 1 white balance, set to C5, Fujichrome Sensia, which uses flurescent 2 white balance, set to C6, and Portra 400, which uses a custom white balance, set to C7. If you did that, since each recipe uses a different white balance, you wouldn’t have to adjust the white balance shift when going between different presets. Also, there a few recipes that share the same white balance and white balance shift as others, such as Kodachrome II and Ektachrome 100SW, so you could use both of those and never have to change the shift.

To make things easy for you, I’ve organized the color film simulation recipes by white balance. Choose one from each until all of your available presets are filled. It’s pretty simple. Unfortunately, you might not be able to use all of your favorite recipes, depending on exactly what the white balance and white balance shifts are. But I hope that you find enough options you like to fill your available presets.

Film Simulation Recipes that use AWB
Film Simulation Recipes that use Kelvin
Film Simulation Recipes that use other White Balances

Since I set up my custom presets this way on my camera, it’s made a world of difference to me. It’s so much easier moving between recipes! The user experience has been greatly improved. I hope that you find this just as useful as I did.

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Bargains: Fujifilm X-T2, X-T20 & X-E3

Fujifilm X-T20 Blog

For those looking for great deals on Fujifilm gear, X-Trans III sensor cameras have the best bargains currently. Cameras like the X-T2, X-T20 and X-E3 are priced pretty darn low, and they’re still excellent and worth owning. I know that the X-Pro3 has received much attention lately, but don’t overlook what’s available right now, and at such cheap prices, too!

Below are my affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using the links I will be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X-T2 (Body Only) $800   B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm X-T2 w/35mm lens $1,200   B&H

Fujifilm X-T20 (Body Only) $600   B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm X-T20 w/16-50mm lens $700   B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm X-T20 w/18-55mm lens $900   B&H   Amazon

Fujifilm X-E3 (Body Only) $600   B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm X-E3 w/23mm f/2 lens $850   B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm X-E3 w/18-55mm lens $900   B&H   Amazon

Announced: Fujifilm X-Pro3

Fujifilm X-Pro3 Blog

Fujifilm just announced the upcoming X-Pro3! It will be released on November 29 with an MSRP of $1,800 (body only), or December 13 for the Dura versions, which will have an MSRP of $2,000. This new iteration of the X-Pro camera is much different than the previous two, at least on the inside and back. There are a lot of changes and new features, so let’s take a look at those.

The Fujifilm X-Pro3 has an unusual tilt screen, which is mounted backwards and flips down for waist-level shooting. On the back of the screen, which faces out when the screen is closed, is a small screen that displays some exposure and film simulation information. The idea is that most X-Pro3 users will primarily use the viewfinder and not the LCD for composing. It’s also a way to further differentiate this camera from the X-T3. I think it’s either something you’ll love or hate, and I’m still on the fence with how I feel about it, but I’m leaning towards love. I haven’t had my hands on one to know for sure what I think about it.

Fujifilm X-Pro3 Blog

Fujifilm X-Pro3 Blog

Fujifilm X-Pro3 Blog

Besides the unusual screen, Fujifilm did away with the four-way D-Pad on the back. They also re-arranged some of the buttons. The wonderful hybrid viewfinder has been improved. The camera is now made out of titanium. While the rear is clearly different, the front of the camera looks nearly identical to past models, and internally there are some big changes.

The X-Pro3 includes a new film simulation called Classic Negative. It’s supposed to mimic the look of Superia film. I’m pretty excited about Classic Negative, as I’m sure that I could create several great film simulation recipes using it. I think it might become one of my favorites, just looking at the sample images I’ve seen. There’s a good chance that it will be added to the X-T3 and X-T30 via a firmware update in the coming weeks or months, so I’m looking forward to that.

Fujifilm X-Pro3 Blog

There are a ton of other new features on the X-Pro3. The headline is improved auto-focus over the X-T3 and X-T30, although Fujifilm will likely give this new algorithm to the other two cameras soon. It’s supposed to be pretty darn excellent, but I already find the X-T30 to be excellent, so it’s hard to understand how much room for improvement there could be.

The X-Pro3 has a new HDR feature, which can combine and auto-align hand-held pictures. It has much more robust multiple-exposure options, for those who do double or triple (or now up to nine) exposures. There’s a new Clarity feature. There’s a new Curves option, but it’s my understanding that it’s simply a different way to see how Highlight and Shadow adjustments effect the image. B&W toning, instead of just the warm and cool slider found on the X-T3 and X-T30, is now more like white balance shift. On the X-Pro3 you can now change the size of the faux grain, not just the intensity. I hope that all of these new features will be added to the X-T3 and X-T30 in the future, but I don’t know if they will, or perhaps just some of them. It’s clear that the X-Pro3 has some great new options to help you achieve your desired look straight out of camera.

Fujifilm-X-Pro-3-Front

My opinion is that Fujifilm gave the X-Pro line a nice update with the X-Pro3. It’s essentially an X-T3, but better looking, tougher, and with some interesting new features. They’ve made it clear that this camera is about the experience of using it. If you enjoy composing through a viewfinder and not an LCD, and if you use camera-made JPEGs, the X-Pro3 was designed with you in mind. Thanks to the titanium body, it’s tough, and made to take a lickin’ and keep on tickin’ and not even get scratched (if you upgrade to one of the Dura models). It’s a camera you’ll want to buy and keep around for awhile, and not dump as soon as the next model comes out. It’s an old-school photographer’s tool, but it’s certainly not for everyone.

If you’d like to pre-order the X-Pro3, please use my affiliate links below. If you make a purchase using my links, I will be compensated a small amount for it. Nobody pays me to write the articles you find here, so using my affiliate links is a great way to support this website.

Fujifilm X-Pro3 Black:
B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm X-Pro3 Dura Black:
B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm X-Pro3 Dura Silver:
B&H   Amazon

New Fujifilm Classic Negative Film Simulation Coming To X-T3 & X-T30

Fujifilm Classic Negative

Fujifilm recently announced that a new film simulation called Classic Negative, which is supposed to resemble Superia film, will be included on the upcoming X-Pro3. Well, according to Fujirumors, this new film simulation will be coming soon to the X-T3, X-T30 and GFX100 via a big firmware update. The X-Pro3 will also have in-camera curve adjustments and clarity, and it’s not clear if these will also come to the X-T3 and X-T30, but there is certainly a reasonable chance that it will. I’m hopeful that this firmware update, which might possibly be available before the end of the month, will be a “game-changer” of sorts, as these new features are sure to be great!

 

 

New Fujifilm Deals

Fujifilm X-Pro2

Fujifilm just rolled out some new sales, and I thought I’d pass this along to you, in case you are in the market for one of these items. I don’t know if any of these are blockbuster deals, but there are some worth pointing out nonetheless. I hope that whatever you are looking for are among these items.

For cameras, the best deals are on the X-T20 and X-H1. I wanted to point out that the X-H1 bundled with a lens is an especially good bargain. The camera is already a great value at $1,000, but you can bundle it with a lens for an even better deal! The X100F is on sale, which doesn’t happen frequently. If you just need a cheap second body (or perhaps a Christmas or birthday gift for someone), the X-T100 is very inexpensive and worth taking a look at.

For lenses, there are a few good deals, which you can see below. The Fujinon 90mm f/2.8, which I recently reviewed, is on sale, too, but I didn’t include it in this list because it is “only” $100 off. I’m just showing you the best deals. You can find the prices of everything on my Fujifilm Gear page, as there are other cameras and lenses on sale besides what’s found below.

Fujifilm X Cameras:

Fujifilm X100F $1,100   B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm X-T20 (Body Only) $600   B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm X-T20 w/16-50mm lens $700   B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm X-T20 w/18-55mm lens $900   B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm X-H1 (Body Only) w/Power Grip $1,000   B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm X-H1 w/16-55mm f/2.8 lens $1,700   B&H
Fujifilm X-H1 w/8-16mm lens $2,300   B&H
Fujifilm X-H1 w/18-135mm lens $1,700   B&H
Fujifilm X-H1 w/90mm lens $1,550   B&H
Fujifilm X-H1 w/50-140mm $2,400   B&H
Fujifilm X-H1 w/100-400mm $2,700   B&H
Fujifilm X-T100 (Body Only) $400   B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm X-T100 w/15-45mm lens $500   B&H   Amazon

Fujifilm X Lenses:

Fujinon 8-16mm f/2.8 $1,800   B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm 14mm f/2.8 $650   B&H   Amazon
Fujinon 23mm f/1.4 $650   B&H   Amazon
Fujinon 50-140mm f/2.8 $1,400   B&H   Amazon
Fujinon 80mm f/2.8 $950   B&H   Amazon
Fujinon 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 $1,700   B&H   Amazon

Fujifilm GFX Cameras:

Fujifilm GFX 50R w/63mm lens $5,000   B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm GFX 50R w/32-64mm lens $5,800   B&H   Amazon
Fujifilm GFX 50S (Body Only) $5,000   B&H   Amazon

Fujifilm GFX Lenses:

Fujinon GFX 23mm f/4 $2,100   B&H   Amazon
Fujinon GFX 32-64mm f/4 $1,800   B&H   Amazon
Fujinon GFX 63mm f/2.8 $1,000   B&H   Amazon
Fujinon GFX 100-200mm f/5.6 $1,500   B&H   Amazon
Fujinon GFX 250mm f/4 $2,800   B&H   Amazon

These are affiliate links, which, when you purchase something using them, I get a small kickback. It doesn’t cost you anything, yet it helps to financially support this website. I would never ask you to purchase something that you don’t want, but if you found this article helpful and are planning to buy one of these items, using my links to do so helps me tremendously. Thank you for your support!

My Fujifilm Gear Page

Fujifilm Gear

Have you visited my Fujifilm Gear page? The intention of this new page is to make it more convenient to find camera and lens reviews, recommendations, and links to buy. Up until recently it has been difficult to find that information because you had to dig for it. The articles were on this blog, but you might have missed them when they were new and perhaps were unaware of their existence, or didn’t know how to locate them. Now it’s all in one easy-to-find place, which should improve the Fuji X Weekly experience, at least a little.

As I write more articles, I will expand the page, adding relevant material. As best as I can I will keep the links accurate so that you can see what gear is available and what’s on sale, which will hopefully make gear shopping a tad easier for you. I’m hoping that this will be a good resource, and it will be a page that you’ll return to often. I’ve made a few additions and changes since the page went live three weeks ago, and I plan to keep working on it over the coming weeks to improve it even more.

To get to Fujifilm Gear, simply click on the three bars (the “hamburger menu”) at the top-left of this page, and then click on Fujifilm Gear. Once there, I recommend bookmarking the page so that you can easily find it whenever you might want to access it. I also invite you to follow Fuji X Weekly, if you haven’t already done so. When you are at the top of this page, click “follow” on the bottom-right. Oh, and don’t forget to look me up on Instragram: @fujixweekly.

 

 

 

 

 

5 Tips For Fall Foliage Photography with Fujifilm X Cameras

Processed with RNI Films. Preset 'Fuji Provia 100F'

Vibrant Autumn Forest – Zion NP, UT – Fujifilm X-T20

Fall is one of my favorite times of the year for photography. The weather gets cooler, the coffee turns pumpkin flavored, and the leaves change to vibrant colors. Autumn is the season of change, perhaps more than any other season. Autumn begins almost summer-like, yet ends wintry cold. The trees begin green, but quickly turn yellow, orange and red, before becoming bare and dormant. It’s a vibrant season, that is until winter begins to grab hold. You can’t let time slip away from you or else you’ll miss the annual autumn show, as it never seems to last long enough.

If you don’t have much experience photographing fall foliage, you might not know how to get the most out of it. Since autumn officially began a couple of days ago, and I’ve already seen a few leaves begin to colorfully transform, I thought this would be a good time to share with you some tips for photographing the season of change with your Fujifilm X camera. Below you’ll find five tips for fall foliage photography.

1. Light

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Color – Wasatch Mountain SP, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2

You need quality light to capture good autumn pictures. All great photographs begin with great light, because, after all, without light there is no photograph. Fall foliage pictures feature trees, so you’ll often find that a certain type of light situation works especially well: back-lit. I think, generally speaking, the best light to capture dramatic tree photographs is when the sun is behind the tree. This is even more true in the autumn, as the sunlight illuminates the colorful leaves, displaying them in their most vibrant fashion.

I find that early morning or late evening, when the sun is low to the horizon, provides the best light for fall foliage photographs. Sometimes when the weather is changing, you might find low clouds or fog, which could provide a softer quality of light that can be especially beautiful. While I highly recommend seeking back-lit opportunities, don’t limit yourself strictly to that, but also try to find those fleeting moments of diffused sun.

2. Location

Processed with RNI Films. Preset 'Kodak E 100G'

Yellow Tree Against Red Rock – Zion NP, UT – Fujifilm XF10

Not everyone has a brilliant autumn display near where they live. Those colorful fall landscapes aren’t found everywhere. When I lived in California, I had to drive several hours to find a good show, but I would still try to capture the small amount of colorful leaves that were nearby. There would be a tree at the park, or in someone’s front yard, and even at my own house, that would have a less-than-spectacular display, but nevertheless the leaves would change colors. There were times that by really isolating the subject with a tight crop, I could create a decent picture with what was there. Don’t overlook the small opportunities that are nearby.

Oftentimes, unless you happen to live in the heart of fall leaves, such as one of the New England states, you’ll have to travel to photograph a grand display. Do a little research and plan your trip wisely. You’ll want to find out where a good location is, when the leaves are at their colorful peak, and what the weather will be, so that you can make the most of your photographic adventure. Pre-planning goes a long ways, and as the saying goes, “Location, location, location!”

3. Leaves

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Sycamore Autumn – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm XF10

Robert Capa famously said, “If your pictures aren’t good enough, you’re not close enough.” That’s not always true, but often it is, and you might find it to be helpful advice for your autumn pictures. Get close to the leaves, capturing their shapes and patterns. Don’t be afraid to use a macro lens and get super close. Make the leaves the main subject, and don’t even show the rest of the scene in your composition.

Some of the best autumn pictures that I’ve seen have a narrow focus. Isolate the scene with a tight crop. Make the scene a bit abstract. Oftentimes less is more. The vibrant leaves are what make this season so colorful, so don’t hesitate to make that the clear subject of your pictures.

4. Lenses

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Yellow & Green Trees – Wasatch Mountain SP, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2

You can use any lens to photograph fall foliage, but I find that telephoto lenses are especially useful. The Fujinon 90mm f/2 is a good one for creating tight compositions. The Fujinon 60mm f/2.4 Macro is another good one for this, plus it’s a macro lens, so you can focus close to the leaves. Another strategy is to go wide-angle, and showcase the larger scene. It’s a little trickier, but the results can be very rewarding. The more wide-angle, the more dramatic, but also the more difficult. The Fujinon 16mm f/2.8 might be a good option for this.

My recommendation is to have a few lenses in your bag, if you can. If you’re only going to have one, consider a telephoto lens instead of a wide-angle. Best case is that you have a telephoto, a wide-angle and a “standard” prime. A zoom lens, like the Fujinon 16-55mm f/2.8, would be a very good alternative, especially if you don’t want to carry a bunch of gear around.

5. Lively

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Red Leaves In The Forest – Wasatch Mountain SP, UT – Fujifilm X-Pro2

Go bold when capturing the vivid colors of the season. My favorite film simulation recipes for autumn pictures are ones that use Velvia, either my original Velvia recipe, the new Velvia, or my Ektachrome 100SW recipe. Astia can work well, too, and my Ektar recipe, which utilizes Astia, is a good option. I’ve even had good luck with my Vintage Kodachrome recipe, so don’t be afraid to try different settings, but, generally speaking, the lively colors of Velvia deliver the best results for fall foliage pictures.

This article contains affiliate links to purchase products, and, if you buy something, I get a small kickback for referring you. Nobody pays me to write the articles on this blog. If you like what you read on Fuji X Weekly and wish to help support this website, if you are planning to purchase something, using my links is appreciated. Thanks!

Featured Gear: Fujifilm X-Pro2

Fujifilm X-Pro2

Fujifilm X-Pro2

Fujifilm recently confirmed that the X-Pro3 is forthcoming and will include some new features. The X-Pro3 will have an unusual backwards-mounted rear screen, a small second rear screen that displays exposure and film simulation information, no four-way D-Pad, plus a brand new film simulation and some new JPEG options like clarity and curve adjustments. The screen setup has created a lot of buzz, and it seems that people either love or hate the redesign. The X-Pro3 might be the most controversial update by Fujifilm ever, and it hasn’t even been officially announced yet.

The X-Pro line is Fujifilm’s second most beautifully designed camera, only marginally behind the X100 series. Fuji knows how to produce appealing cameras, and X-Pro cameras look great! They resemble 1960’s-era 35mm rangefinders, and can even operate like one. It has a really cool hybrid viewfinder, that can work optically, digitally or both. The X-Pro design produces an experience that’s different from other digital cameras.

The X-Pro2 was released in March of 2016. Despite being three-and-a-half years old now, the X-Pro2 doesn’t often get discounted. It’s a popular camera that’s almost in the collectible or cult-like realm of Leica. It’s one of those cameras that I think most people would love to own just for the joy of it. Is the X-T3 a better camera? Absolutely. Is the X-T3 more fun or better looking? Absolutely not. Enjoyable and superior-styling are how I would describe the X-Pro line. People will often ask you about the camera in your hand when you shoot with an X-Pro. There’s pride in owning one. I know this from first-hand experience. And the joy of the shooting experience is what this camera is about.

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Twisted Tree – Keystone, SD – Fujifilm X-Pro2

While the X-Pro3 is around the corner, and will be available to buy before the end of the year, there are reasons to get yourself an X-Pro2 instead. First, the X-Pro2 is available for purchase today, and you don’t have to wait. Plus, it’s currently discounted, since the new camera was conformed by Fujifilm. The upcoming version has the unusual rear screen, which you might not like and maybe think is odd, and it also doesn’t have a D-Pad, which the X-Pro2 does have. You might find the backside of the X-Pro2 a better fit for you than the X-Pro3. Aside from all of that, the X-Trans IV sensor and processor inside the new version isn’t a huge upgrade over the X-Trans III sensor and processor inside the X-Pro2. The biggest benefit to X-Trans IV is heat (the new sensor runs cooler), which allows the camera to operate faster. Your style of photography might not require blazing fast auto-focus. There’s not much of a difference in image quality between X-Trans III and IV. The X-Pro3, aside from some design changes and a few JPEG features, isn’t much different than the X-Pro2, and they’re probably about 90-95% the same exact camera.

Below are the current prices (as of this writing) on the Fujifilm X-Pro2, whether for just the camera body or bundled with a lens. The graphite version with the 23mm lens looks especially appealing, and has the largest discount. You will find affiliate links to buy the camera at both B&H and Amazon. If you do, I will get a small kickback for referring you. Nobody pays me to write the articles you find on this blog, so using my affiliate links to buy an item is an opportunity for you to support what I do on Fuji X Weekly, and it’s greatly appreciated.

Fujifilm X-Pro2 (Body Only): $1,499 ($200 off)
Buy: B&H  Amazon

Fujifilm X-Pro2 w/23mm f/2 lens: $1,948 ($200 off)
Buy: B&H   Amazon

Fujifilm X-Pro2 w/35mm f/2 lens: $1,898 ($200 off)
Buy: B&H   Amazon

Fujifilm X-Pro2 w/50mm f/2 lens: $1,948 ($200 off)
Buy: B&H   Amazon

Fujifilm X-Pro2 Graphite w/23mm f/2 lens: $1,949 ($350 off)
Buy: B&H   Amazon

My Fujifilm X-T30 Kodak Elite Chrome 200 Color Fade Film Simulation Recipe

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JTPX 1204 – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Elite Chrome 200 Color Fade”

I recently ran across some old slides that I had forgotten about, and one of those color transparencies was a frame of Kodak Elite Chrome 200 that was beginning to fade and change color. The picture wasn’t especially good, but it looked interesting because of how the image was transforming. Elite Chrome was a version of Ektachrome, which has been dubbed Fade-a-chrome, as it’s very prone to fading and discoloration, especially if not stored correctly, which this particular picture wasn’t. You can see the fading Elite Chrome 200 photograph below.

I wondered if I could create a film simulation recipe that mimics the look of fading Elite Chrome 200. I experimented with the settings a bunch, but couldn’t get it to look right. After showing my wife, Amanda, she suggested that the digital picture looked too crisp, too detailed. I made some more modifications, and found myself much closer. Not perfect, but very close. I made more changes and adjustments, but unfortunately I couldn’t get it to look better, so I went back to those settings that were very close to being right, which is the recipe here.

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DGNO Locomotive – Dallas, TX – Canon AE-1 & Kodak Elite Chrome 200 35mm film

One addition to this film simulation recipe that you’ve never seen in any of my other recipes is Image Quality. I have always used Fine, because it’s the highest quality setting, but in this case Fine was, well, too fine. I set it to Normal instead so as to better mimic the transparency. While I’m sure this particular recipe is not for everyone, those looking for something that resembles film from decades ago might appreciate it, as it has an analog aesthetic, and a look that’s a bit unusual, perhaps a bit lomographic (did I just make up a word?).

Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: 0
Shadow: +2
Color: -2
Noise Reduction: +2
Sharpening: -4
Grain Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Image Quality: Normal
White Balance: 8300K, +4 Red & +8 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to -2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this Kodak Elite Chrome 200 Color Fade recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

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Green Locomotive – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Tank Rider – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Tracks By The Refinery – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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American Joe – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Neighborhood Patriotism – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Sidewalk Tricycle – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Red Flag – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Peek – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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One Eye Open – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Evening Bike – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Fence & Path – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Out Flowing – North Salt Lake, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Mountain Sky – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Wet Red Rose – Layton, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Rose Blossom Fence – South Weber, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

X-Pro3 To Have New Film Simulation: Classic Negative

Fujifilm Classic Negative

The upcoming Fujifilm X-Pro3, which will feature an unusual rear screen, will have a new film simulation called Classic Negative, which is supposed to resemble Superia film, according to Fujifilm. I get a lot of requests for Superia, so I’m very happy to see this as a new film simulation. Yea!

Fujirumors stated that the X-Pro3 will have some additional adjustments for in-camera RAW processing, such as Clarity. I welcome this because the more tools that Fujifilm provides, the more easily I can achieve a desired look in-camera. Fujifilm is one of only a few companies that take camera-made JPEGs seriously, and is one of the big reasons why I appreciate their products. Shooting JPEGs saves me so much time, allowing my photography to be more productive while simultaneously allowing me to spend more time elsewhere, such as with my family.

I hope that Fujifilm makes these things–the Classic Negative film simulation and the additional tools–available to other cameras, such as the X-T3 and X-T30, which share the same sensor and processor as the upcoming X-Pro3. There is, according to Fujirumors, some big firmware updates on the horizon, and I hope that these are a part of that. Sometimes, when a new feature is included in a new camera, Fujifilm will update older cameras to include it as well, and sometimes they don’t. So it’s really hard to know. I will keep my fingers crossed.

Fujifilm Classic NegativeFujifilm X-Pro3Fujifilm X-Pro3Fujifilm X-Pro3