Fujifilm X100V (X-Trans IV) Film Simulation Recipe: Xpro ’62

Empty Diner – Reno, NV – Fujifilm X100V – “Xpro ’62”

Inspiration for film simulation recipes can come from unusual places. This recipe, for example, was inspired by a promotional photograph of Ron Howard for the movie American Graffiti hanging on the wall of Mels Diner in Reno, Nevada. A little trivia: Ron Howard shoots Fujifilm cameras—or, at least, he’s been spotted sporting an X100F. Anyway, it seems unlikely, but it’s true, that an old image of Ron Howard from 1973 hanging on the wall of a restaurant in Reno inspired a new recipe that will be used by hundreds—maybe thousands—of Fujifilm photographers across the world.

This particular picture, which you can see in the image below towards the left-side, had a cross-process look to it, like reversal film developed in negative film chemistry. Of course, cross-processed film can have many different looks, depending on several factors, including (especially) the film used. I have no idea what film or process was used for that Ron Howard picture—I tried researching it, but came up empty; however, while I was waiting for my dinner to arrive at the table, I fiddled with the settings on my Fujifilm X100V and created a facsimile to that picture aesthetic.

Picture of Ron Howard (left-side) that inspired this recipe… captured with this recipe.

The photographer who captured the picture is most likely Dennis Stock. I couldn’t find a whole lot about what films he used for his color photographs or his darkroom techniques. Dennis was a legendary Magnum photographer who was best known for his celebrity photographs. His picture might not actually be cross-processed film, but it has a cross-processed look nonetheless.

The reason why I named this recipe “Xpro ’62” is because Xpro is a common abbreviation for “cross-process” and 1962 is the year that American Graffiti takes place. Promotional posters for the movie often included the question, “Where were you in ’62?” I thought that “Xpro ’62” would be a logical fit. Because this film simulation recipe uses the Classic Negative film simulation and other new JPEG options available on the newer cameras, it is only compatible with (as of this writing) the Fujifilm X-Pro3, X100V, X-T4, X-S10 and X-E4. Also, for some of the pictures in this article I used a Tiffen 1/4 Black Pro Mist filter to diffuse the highlights (such as Empty Diner at the top).

Wharf – Santa Cruz, CA – Fujifilm X100V – “Xpro ’62”

Classic Negative
Dynamic Range: DR400
Highlight: +3
Shadow: 0
Color: +4
Noise Reduction: -4
Sharpening: -4
Clarity: -4
Grain Effect: Strong, Large
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Color Chrome Effect Blue: Strong
White Balance: Auto, -3 Red & -9 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +1/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this new “Xpro ’62” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X100V:

Cigarettes – Reno, NV – Fujifilm X100V
Wall Harley – Reno, NV – Fujifilm X100V
In Bottles – Reno, NV – Fujifilm X100V
Stay Apart – Hollister, CA – Fujifilm X100V
Casa de Cherries – Hollister, CA – Fujifilm X100V
Basketball Hoop Unused – San Francisco, CA – Fujifilm X100V
Stop Turning – Santa Cruz, CA – Fujifilm X100V
Tracks & Bridge – Santa Cruz, CA – Fujifilm X100V
Suburban Truck – Reno, NV – Fujifilm X100V
Electric Intersection – Reno, NV – Fujifilm X100V
Flower by the Path – Reno, NV – Fujifilm X100V
Flowers & Stone – Hollister, CA – Fujifilm X100V
Lower Yosemite Falls – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V
Tree & Lower Falls – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V
Yosemite Trees – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V
Sentinel Above Merced River – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V
Upper Yosemite Falls – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V
El Cap – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V
El Cap & Merced – Yosemite NP, CA – Fujifilm X100V

This post contains affiliate links, and if you make a purchase using my links I’ll be compensated a small amount for it.

Fujifilm X100V Black    Amazon   B&H
Fujifilm X100V Silver   Amazon   B&H

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Fujifilm X-Trans III + X-T30 & X-T3 Film Simulation Recipe: Chrome Bypass

Don’t Walk Under Falling Bicycles – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Chrome Bypass”

There are a number of X-Trans IV film simulation recipes that I’ve had multiple requests to create versions for that are compatible with X-Trans III and X-T3 and X-T30 cameras. LomoChrome Metropolis and Bleach Bypass are two that are commonly requested. These recipes require JPEG settings that don’t exist on the “older” cameras, including the Classic Negative or Eterna Bleach Bypass film simulations. I knew it would be impossible to recreate those recipes for X-Trans III and the X-T3 and X-T30 cameras, but I wanted to get as close as I could. After much experimenting, I came up with some settings that are sometimes similar to the LomoChrome Metropolis recipe and are sometimes similar to the Bleach Bypass recipe, and sometimes not like either.

What the LomoChrome Metropolis and the Bleach Bypass recipes have in common are that they’re both high in contrast and low in color saturation. There are some other similarities between them, but there’s plenty that’s different, too. This recipe with certain subjects and in certain light situations can resemble one or the other, or neither. It’s as close as I could get. If you like the LomoChrome Metropolis and Bleach Bypass recipes, this is your best bet for X-Trans III and X-T3 and X-T30 cameras (aside from doing double-exposures). While it’s not as “perfect” as I was hoping to achieve, I think it’s a pretty good recipe for capturing dramatic pictures. It’s kind of (but not really) the low saturation version of Dramatic Classic Chrome.

1100 Stop – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 – “Chrome Bypass”

Because these settings resemble both the LomoChrome Metropolis and the Bleach Bypass film simulation recipes, I decided to name this recipe Chrome Bypass, taking a little from each name. I don’t currently have access to an X-Trans III camera, so I don’t have any samples captured with a Fujifilm X-Trans III camera, but it should look very similar.

PRO Neg. Std
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +3
Shadow: +4
Color: -4
Color Chrome Effect: Off or N/A
Sharpness: -1
Noise Reduction: -4
Grain Effect: Strong
White Balance: Auto, +2 Red & -5 Blue
ISO: Auto up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: 0 to +2/3 (typically)

Sample photographs, all camera-made JPEGs, captured with a Fujifilm X-T30 using this “Chrome Bypass” film simulation recipe:

Mountain Teasels – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Cloudy Branches – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Summer Tree – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Country Fence & Old Tires – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Tulip Pot – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Colorful Tulips – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Handy Dandy Grill – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Little Bit of Green – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Thrown Pillow – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30
Instax Table – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

Find this film simulation recipe on the Fuji X Weekly — Film Recipes App!

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My Fujifilm X-T30 “Bleach Bypass” Film Simulation Recipe


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Instamatic Morning – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Bleach Bypass”

The upcoming Fujifilm X-T4 will have a new film simulation: Bleach Bypass. This new film simulation might eventually come to other X-Trans IV cameras, such as the X-T30, X-T3, X-Pro3 and X100V, but it might not, as Fujifilm has yet to add Classic Negative to the X-T3 and X-T30. It would certainly be nice if Fujifilm gave those of us with “older” X-Trans IV cameras the new film simulations. Even if they never do, you are in luck, as I have created a film simulation recipe to mimic the look of bleach bypass!

Bleach bypass is a darkroom technique where you skip or limit the bleach during development of color film, which causes it to retain the silver. Results will vary greatly depending on the film used and exactly how you develop it, but generally speaking what you get with bleach bypass is a high-contrast, low-saturation, grainy picture that appears as if a black-and-white and color picture were combined together. This technique is more common for motion picture film than still photography, but some people do bleach bypass with C-41 film.

I experimented with the techniques that I used for this film simulation back in June of last year. Much came out of those experiments, including both the Faded Color and Faded Monochrome film simulation recipes, as well as in-camera texturing. I created something similar to this recipe, but gave up on it before completing it. Last week Fuji X Weekly reader James Clinich reached out to me to share some experiments he had been doing, which turned out to be very similar to what I had done back in June. This rekindled my interest, and with inspiration drawn from James, I made this “Bleach Bypass” film simulation recipe.

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Car’s 3 & 4 – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30 “Bleach Bypass”

This film simulation recipe requires the use of the double exposure feature of your camera. You will need a tripod, and there can’t be any movement in the scene. You have to make two identical exposures, one in color and one in black-and-white. After the first exposure is made, you must change the film simulation before making the second exposure. You can have both sets of settings programmed into the custom menu as separate presets, and toggle between them, or just change the film simulation, making sure that the tone is set correctly when making the Acros exposure. It’s a bit tricky and limited, but the results are nice. If you don’t want to do double exposures, but want something that will produce similar results to this recipe, try my Dramatic Classic Chrome recipe except set color to -4. That’s about as close as you can get. Otherwise, if you want to create a bleach bypass look in-camera, this recipe is your best option.

Exposure 1
Classic Chrome
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +3
Shadow: +4
Color: +2
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Strong
Sharpening: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
White Balance: Auto, -1 Red & +3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Exposure 2
Acros
Dynamic Range: DR200
Highlight: +3
Shadow: +4
Tone: +2 (warm)
Color Chrome Effect: Strong
Grain: Strong
Sharpening: +1
Noise Reduction: -4
White Balance: Auto, -1 Red & +3 Blue
ISO: Auto, up to ISO 6400
Exposure Compensation: +1/3 to +2/3 (typically)

Example photographs, all camera-made JPEGs using this “Bleach Bypass” film simulation recipe on my Fujifilm X-T30:

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Pillows – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Window Robot – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49566795401_7fda9e267c_c

Illuminated Faux Flowers – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49562528373_e875365df2_c

Pronto! – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49562529023_e9687a7b36_c

Touch of Green – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49566794776_c4a1b97e9f_c

Rooftops & Mountaintops – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

49571404366_da4414a829_c

Tracks Under The Bridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Do Not Cross Tracks – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Locked Box & Escape Route – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

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Empty Walking Bridge – Farmington, UT – Fujifilm X-T30

See also: Film Simulation Recipes

Help Fuji X Weekly

Nobody pays me to write the content found on fujixweekly.com. There's a real cost to operating and maintaining this site, not to mention all the time that I pour into it. If you appreciated this article, please consider making a one-time gift contribution. Thank you!

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